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Skiing MA - new skis - Page 2

post #31 of 41

One thing I'd suggest:  try to minimize the up movement you are getting by pulling the feet toward you in the transition.  It's not a huge thing, but I think you are loosing a bit of your alignment because of too much "up and over" as opposed to "cross under."  No need to go to a full retraction turn, but a bit more retraction would provide more power to the outside ski in the initiation of the turn.

 

Mike

post #32 of 41
Thread Starter 

Hi Metaphor_

 

Thanks for the comments.  I agree with them (early inside move, ski reverse wedging, etc).

 

I managed to ski on monday for a bit.  I tried work on my skiing with your comments in mind -  to do a traverse to allow re-centering and baby toe edge move.  Of course everything else went to pot (rotating / wedging / lack of concentration).

 

Here's a video of a few of those turns

 

Thanks for the discussion and keep on turning,

 

Cheers

 

post #33 of 41
Thread Starter 

Hi Hatacomike

 

Thanks for your comments - I agree with them too!  Here's a clip from monday in which I tried to improve my skiing like your suggestion.  I tried reduce my 'up' but it was a really sunny day and my brain was going soft by this run (last run of the day)

 

Cheers

 

 

Not sure if you ski summit county or front range, but PM me if you would like to ski together midweek.

post #34 of 41

 

What a great example of an online movement analysis.  A good skier valiantly posts his video to the instructor thread and one that is not hard to look at. While our retinas remain in tact, a wealth of comments are logged in from a variety of sources. The usual conflict ensues in the battle over perceived validation of one’s comments and entertains those more interested in the morbidity of the dark side of online forum discussion, one that reaches the level of outside moderation. The skier, knowledgeably experienced, chooses the more relevant comments to respond to and offers more video in fulfilling requests of adjusted videographic circumstances. A new round of comments are logged in, some of which are, again, taken back to the hill resulting in a third round of video production. The video clearly demonstrates the suggested changes for the humbly receptive and appreciative expert skier.

 

This is a great demonstration of the benefits of online movement analysis and its certain advantages over a one on one in-person lesson. While the immediate feedback of in-person is a key advantage, it may be the only one. The online MA offers much more time and back and forth discussion from a wider array of suggestive opinion with which to process a higher level of feedback results. While Ignoring the possible detractor of negativity can be a distraction, a spirited debate can be a tool to percolate aspects of a conflict based discussion that may not otherwise surface. Even newbie comments are allowed to make their way in that can offer an “out of the box” perspective that may hit a vein and one of which only such a loose frame of perspective could provide. The level, quantity and diversity of feedback comprehension could be seen to equal that of three to five privates at a cost that would rival that of a new computer, video camera and fees paid to a videographer.

 

As well, these benefits extend to the instructors and coaches to sharpen the teeth they will bring onto the hill themselves and allowing newbies to witness and/or experience a process that is normally hidden with the privacy of in person private lesson. Another key benefit to all participants is that the entire process is fully documented and saved for re-examination at any time. While there are many other resources for facilitating similar benefits, Epic is the only site with the membership from which one will find such a deeply knowledgeable, widely expansive and uniquely multifaceted movement analysis. It is a sincere pleasure of mine to witness these types of outcomes.

 

 

post #35 of 41

That's some very nice skiing, DS.  And some good progress.

 

One other thing you might think of is your hands.  Your inside hand should be above your outside hand,  This will help with your alignment and augment your good upper/lower body separation.

 

I'm spending my time in Aspen until closing, but perhaps we can find some time to ski together around the Mother's day gathering?

 

Mike

post #36 of 41

 

 

 
I have been looking at the "patient" clip and the following one again and, the more I look, the more I am enviously impressed. While I have plenty of the WC to watch when looking to satisfy the more aggressive nature of my appreciation, it is refreshing to see something new every once in a while like this that is smooth, relaxed and dynamically balanced on a well bent ski. Perfect to have a smooth wide and empty slope like that for it.
post #37 of 41

Great skiing. Keep those inside arms up and strong.

post #38 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadslow View Post

 

 


Doesn't look like you are dead slow.

Nice turns.

post #39 of 41

Great short leg/long leg action!   Although 99 percent of the recreational skiers would be thrilled to ski as well,  check out the  "Get over it"  drill just for the hell of it. 

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by deadslow View Post
 

Hi Hatacomike

 

Thanks for your comments - I agree with them too!  Here's a clip from monday in which I tried to improve my skiing like your suggestion.  I tried reduce my 'up' but it was a really sunny day and my brain was going soft by this run (last run of the day)

 

Cheers

 

 

Not sure if you ski summit county or front range, but PM me if you would like to ski together midweek.

Great skiing.

 

There is something messed up with your right ankle complex, as evidenced by the lack of LTE tipping on this side. Mobility/injury or just fitting/alignement? Also, you have not buckled this boot which makes me think you have a fitting issue? (the unbuckled boot might actually be part of the reason, it feels very weird to tip your foot when you don't have any resistance)

 

If you want to up your game you can start flexing the outside leg already at the fall line.

 

Also you could play with keeping hip angulation and counter longer into the transition. With these two things you can look like below in the transition, and a whole new world will open up.

You are obviously a good skier already and you don't "need" a transition like this in your repertoire unless you are racing, but it is great fun...

 

post #41 of 41
Thread Starter 

Hello All,

 

Thanks again for the tips / pointers / drills / direction.  I'll try to keep working on my turns, alignment and hand position, etc.  Sometimes the hands tend to wander due to two humerus fractures (one per arm, both at the shoulder joint).

 

Here's a short video illustrating where my skiing has progressed from:

 

 

Cheers!

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