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Best Colorado Ski Instructors?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Who do you think are the best Ski Instructors in Colorado?

 

I wrote a fun article about the best instructors that I have trained with, but would love to get additional perspectives, especially from those that have experienced high quality teaching from top pros. Also, if anyone has trained with a number of top pros in other locations and would like to write a guest column for Ski School Pros, please contact us. 

 

Thanks

post #2 of 12
Fyi - Reilly is teaching in Japan this season.
post #3 of 12

Harald ####? I bet no-one can even mention the names of some.

 

I've no idea but the question seems kind of a nonsense to me as no-ordinary punter can have possibly sampled more than a single digit number in any depth.  or else yo're just going to get the names of trainers who instructors themselves have trained with.

post #4 of 12
Another vote here for Tom Riddle.
post #5 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pacmantwoskis View Post

Another vote here for Tom Riddle.

 

This took me a minute, and I'm a pretty big Potterhead. 

post #6 of 12

I only have experience with Breck instructors in recent years, so unless you want an article on Breck instructors specifically ... but here are some of my favorites:

 

Jenn Losch. Fun, inspirational, will give you a kick in the butt when you need it. I don't know any other female instructors who huck and rip like she does.

Matt Belleville - You will not find his top end. Great instructor. Quiet, with occasional spot-on feedback. 

JJ Hyon - Rips, loves to have fun, different perspective on life and skiing.

Kevin  Handley - Fantastic bump skier who seems to specialize in pushing level 6-8 students just past their comfort zone. He certainly was primarily responsible for my journey from level 6 to level 8.

Patrick Guilbert - Great tips and finds the best snow on the mountain.

Carl "Yogi" Richter - follow him in the bumps and trees, and be amazed at how he slithers through them like there's nothing there.

Randy Brooks - Excellent tightly focused drills and detailed explanations for those who really want to understand and develop body mechanics

 

I know there are lots more that are great, but these are the ones I've skied with recently. I'm sure I'm forgetting someone important.

 

It occurs to me that all my favorite instructors love to ski. I mean, they always look like they are having fun. That is *so* important to me.

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post
 

Harald ####? I bet no-one can even mention the names of some.

 

I've no idea but the question seems kind of a nonsense to me as no-ordinary punter can have possibly sampled more than a single digit number in any depth.  or else yo're just going to get the names of trainers who instructors themselves have trained with.

 

This is a very good point but not in consideration that any article like this is going to be for a junk media side story that may be a fun read but is not going to represent the reality it may suggest which now seems to be the crux of all modern media.

post #8 of 12

I can't help but think the title is a little misleading, why not just ask an open question, "who are the top instructors", then state your experiences.

 

Back to the best. A whole bunch of Epic regulars would immediately add @Bob Barnes the list, he is presently at Aspen Highlands. It was my pleasure to shake his hand last week. 

 

And, for sure, no Colorado Best List should ever exclude Harald Harb, nobody has ever put more good skiing information into the public media than him. He may be persona non grata here, but, who else runs his own ski schools?

post #9 of 12

I just wish there were instructors I could watch occasionally whom I'd actually like to ski like.....given they spend a hundred plus days a year on snow. Someone mentioned Reilly, now he's an exception, that's how all sub 45yr old pro ski instructors should be able to ski...

 

Interski - not much form to emulate here based from this still image. It's the typical image of ski school instructors...IMO.

 

Inclination 1.jpg

 

Even Bob doesn't look like he's much of a fan of angulation as a default. I guess there is always the inside ski to rely upon. No doubt he can dial it in when he wants too. Very nice early edges though!

 

BB inclining.jpg

post #10 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashski View Post

I just wish there were instructors I could watch occasionally whom I'd actually like to ski like.....given they spend a hundred plus days a year on snow. Someone mentioned Reilly, now he's an exception, that's how all sub 45yr old pro ski instructors should be able to ski...

Interski - not much form to emulate here based from this still image. It's the typical image of ski school instructors...IMO.

Inclination 1.jpg


Even Bob doesn't look like he's much of a fan of angulation as a default. I guess there is always the inside ski to rely upon. No doubt he can dial it in when he wants too. Very nice early edges though!

BB inclining.jpg

Nice to see you still trolling with this argument! Got to admire your persistance.
post #11 of 12
Squatty Schuller has long been regarded as one of the best. As have others here in the state who like Squatty have won that award. Google ski intructor of the year in Colorado for a list of those folks.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ashski View Post

 

Even Bob doesn't look like he's much of a fan of angulation as a default. I guess there is always the inside ski to rely upon. No doubt he can dial it in when he wants too. Very nice early edges though!

 

BB inclining.jpg

I'm not too sure this comment is very representative of the knowledge that would typically be required to assess this or any skier's use of angulation. This skier shows plenty of angulation in turn phase three (in the third still from the back) where it should be indicated. In turn phase one (in the last three stills) what we see is a much higher ratio of inclination where it should be indicated. Tipping angles and counterbalance are derived from a progressively shifting ratio and delineation of both inclination and angulation and always in that order. In bigger, faster turns such as that of above, a higher ratio of inclination over angulation will be indicated throughout the progression as is the case here. Furthermore and regardless of all that, the ratio, duration, intensity, rate and timing of these movements are all very situational and any one example such as depicted above will extend no significance to the comment made.

 

Regarding the comment about instructor abilities in the synchro still, a good teacher need only to be able to demonstrate what they teach. Beyond that, an instructor's ability of the "teaching" itself is far more important. An up and coming instructor can “accumulate” a lot of ski teaching knowledge and “earn” a high level of ability for physical demonstration, however, while some teaching skill can be both “accumulated and earned”, much of the “cream” of ski teaching ability is innate/instinctual and, in other words, “you either got it or you don’t”. Much can be learned from instructors and coaches who are no longer able to demonstrate much of the athletic component regarding something that a student may be working on. A dolphin turn may be a good example. Effective learning requires an open mind. One’s ability to advantageously assimilate helpful information that may come from a known technical underling is a good example of one’s keen ability to learn in the face of such meaningless detractions. In this light I would rather take a lesson from a psia level 1 expert skier who is an excellent teacher than a Level 3 who may be more knowledgeable and a better skier but just wasn't born with a "teaching" personality who simply cannot read people well. While that may not keep someone away from gaining a L3 cert., it will eventually show its ugly face with a paltry number of requests from returning customers over an expanded period of time.

 

Additionally, using a still of synchronized skiing for technical analysis where syncing up with other skiers is the primary goal is going to produce a misleading false negative. The added burden of synchronizing the above referenced DIRT with other skiers is going to be in direct conflict with an individual’s personal technique thus forcing a significant technical compromise. The only fair assessment that could be made is in regards to the synchronization itself which also cannot be done with a still. If a motor pattern had DNA, it would be the DIRT and, within this vein of theory, all skiers come swimming from different and unique pools of DIRT (so to speak).

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