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Shin on my boots

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 
Hello again, much appreciate all the input and help I can get here.
I have been having trouble keeping shin of my leg against boot tongue , and find myself having to flex my body to achieve that , so I won't fall back, which puts me in an awkward position. My boots maybe a bit too stiff for me, that I know, but any simple , practical maneuvers I can try on my own, before I end up going to the shop, thanks much for any help
post #2 of 9

well, there are so many variables to boot flex / fit; the best is to go to someone who can help you figure out where the problem lies. Your current post gives almost no info (actually you give NO info...) except that you believe your boots are too stiff...

and yes, 'fit' is a large component of how well you can work the boot.

My comment is given in a positive light, since helping is good. If you want to improve your skiing experience, go see a bonefide knowledgeable someone to help you figure it out.

post #3 of 9

take a lesson, this one you have near zero chance of solving with posting to a forum

post #4 of 9

When you do up your boot, there should be no open space between the cuff and the shin. Any movement you make with your foot should cause the boot to immediately react. If you're feeling a gap and you can't do up the boot snugly enough, the boot is too big - see a bootfitter.

 

If your cuff is already touching the shin but you cant actually bend the boot, try bending down like you're doing a squat. If it still doesn't bend, see your bootfitter. 

 

Good luck!

post #5 of 9

being forward/centered is a state of balance where the shin exits the boot at the proper angle for your body to be in natural balance. at that angle, the shin should now be supported by the boot cuff.

 

when you put the boots on, try it this way:

- strap over the liner but not over the plastic - if you have to, put the strap under the plastic (between the plastic and the liner)

- do not over tighten the top two buckles: your foot needs some leeway inside the boot, to adapt to skiing situations.

 

the boot cuff may be too long for your leg/body and this may create additional trouble getting forward.

 

the flex is usually the last to investigate (boot too stiff although sometimes a boot too soft is the culprit).

post #6 of 9
Thread Starter 
Thank you all for taking the time to reply, will try some of the suggestions here this wknd., to clarify a few things, I am 6'1", weight around 215 lbs, in a Mach 1 130, LV, the boot itself and the cuff are quite snug, if anything, the toe box had to be adjusted as it was too tight , but no longer an issue, and I have a custom foot bed, movements in the lower boot are as supposed to be, or at least so I think, no heel lift, no hot spots, and no space between my shin and the cuff, it is just that when I am in a turn, I do not feel the ankle flex is transformed to equivalent pressure along the boot tongue, which drives me to lean farther forward so my body weight would push the cuff, not sure this is how it is supposed to be, nor does it feel natural or sustainable, so I tried an eliminator, and some shims to minimize that effect, no much success though
post #7 of 9

I agree with some of what has been said above. If it's a boot issue, a boot fitter needs to fix it. However, if it is a technique issue, here are some potential solutions:

 

Rather than thinking about leaning your body forward, try to make a movement where you are pulling your feet underneath you as you go into the turn. 

 

Also, focus on driving your center of mass forwards toward the apex of the new turn fairly early in the turn. As in when you are releasing the edges from the old turn, your focus should be on a positive motion of your mass forward into the new turn. If you are waiting until your skis reach the fall line to execute this move, you will definitely find yourself behind your skis. 

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by Emad View Post

Thank you all for taking the time to reply, will try some of the suggestions here this wknd., to clarify a few things, I am 6'1", weight around 215 lbs, in a Mach 1 130, LV, the boot itself and the cuff are quite snug, if anything, the toe box had to be adjusted as it was too tight , but no longer an issue, and I have a custom foot bed, movements in the lower boot are as supposed to be, or at least so I think, no heel lift, no hot spots, and no space between my shin and the cuff, it is just that when I am in a turn, I do not feel the ankle flex is transformed to equivalent pressure along the boot tongue, which drives me to lean farther forward so my body weight would push the cuff, not sure this is how it is supposed to be, nor does it feel natural or sustainable, so I tried an eliminator, and some shims to minimize that effect, no much success though

Much better on the info. So,    it sounds like you have a decent, good fit, in what should be a good level boot for your size.

So,  you are getting hung up on what ankle flex does and 'pressuring the front of the boot'?  Talking modern ski design, these skis are designed to have turning by edging engineered into the ski, much more than older ski designs. These skis react significantly more to pressuring changes based on fore/aft shift of the skier's mass and turns are scribed by the radius built into the ski.

So, for most situations, fine weight/mass/pressure control causes significant reactions from the ski. And in many situations, the ski reacts most predictably with the mass/pressure on the ski centered. Yes, a little extra forward pressure in the start of a turn initiates it faster; but exaggeration of pressures will cause unpredictable ski behavior.

"Eliminating' the gaps in the boot shaft fit helps eliminate the dramatic and sudden slamming of the shin into the boot shaft front (tongue) and the subsequent rebound which causes a skier to go into a backseat position/posture. But if you have no gaps, then the eliminator only serves to create a more upright lower leg angle, which may or may not be a good thing.

The combination of foot bed angle in the boot (ramp) and the lower leg angle in the shaft contribute the greatest to your ability to center your mass over the ski and also maintain it at some relaxed, comfortable level. The 'ramp'  angle that the boot makes in the binding also affects this. Everything above the lower leg and boot MUST follow in order to create a neutral balance point.

So, if the lower leg is too upright for your body structure/posture, you have 2 options to find a neutral position/posture:  A. bend forward more at the ankle (increasingly hard and very tough to do, hard on the shins). B. Lean forward more from the waist - which is really a poor solution and puts skiers out of balance very quickly, with very slow chances for recovery.

So, on a fairly flat trail/run, letting the skis run easily, try to determine if when the pressures at the tongue and the back of the boot shaft are about equal - are you in a balanced, comfortable position ?  If Not, then working with the combinations of boot/binding ramp angle, boot footbed ramp angle and boot/lower leg angle is needed to get you into a balanced neutral position.

So let us know whether you have to push against the tongue to feel 'balanced' in flat running or that you might have to lean against the back of the boot to find the balanced position (much less likely). If you do this, we'll have more to consider and discuss.

None of this is intended to make up for actual skiing technique issues or lack of understanding of 'How to' - that all comes AFTER first getting into a neutral position.  This is true for all dynamic/sporting efforts/sports.

post #9 of 9


Just like I tell my friends.  Man up and get on 'em!  The boot choice is correct for height/weight/ability.  

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