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Should my quads be burning this much?

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Ok, so I have completed the Ski Instructor level 1 certificate, and close to my level 2... I've been told my stance is pretty good, I bend my ankles, knees and hips and am not riding back seat... I also weight 190 but I have a big upper body, I also have shorter legs very small feat on average,  so much so I have to wear a boot size of 24.5 so that may be putting more stress on my legs... I do have custom insoles as well.

 

I also ride at Revelstoke and primary ride black runs, trees, powder and bumps in ever changing conditions (powder, ice, slop, crud, soft)... On groomer days I don't get too much leg soreness but when I am off piste in more technical and steep terrain with bumps, steeps and tight trees I find my self having to stop pretty often to rest my quads regardless of snow conditions; meanwhile I see a lot of hard chargers that I couldn't even dream to keep up with otherwise I'd lose control or injure myself

 

If it's not my default stance could my boots have too much forward lean? Should I try taking the block out from behind my calf that forces my lean (shins and ankles) forward? Could the fact that I'm very upper body heavy be the problem? Having super small feet?

post #2 of 4

Hi Kulharin,

 

Above all else, skiing is a sport, rather than a passive leisure activity. Given that you're clearly putting effort into your skiing, I'd be surprised if you didn't have some fatigue by the end of a ski day. The better you get, the more efficient you become; at the same time, you start skiing faster and more dynamically, so loads increase.  Add in the off-piste factor and you're sure to be working harder and feeling it at the end of the day. 

 

Regarding forward lean: anything that takes you out of neutral will cause some of your muscles to fire and tire you out. Your bootfitter can help you determine where neutral is for you. Since you're using some kind of shim, try taking it out and seeing how you feel. Worst case you can put it back in. The guys in the "ask a bootfitter" forum could also give more insight here. 

 

Regarding short legs and tiny feet: You'll notice there's no section in the CSIA manual about short-legged tiny footed skiers, so you don't get any free passes on that. 

 

Regarding your skiing: Skiers who ski below the level 2 standard almost always have some stance issues; their motor systems are still being refined with mileage, and they're potentially skiing with tension in the quads while off-piste. I haven't known many level 1 instructors who could ski all day off piste without feeling it.  

 

Regarding your tactics: Your ability to manage the terrain will certainly affect your quad burn. E.g. the skier who crashes into bump after bump will feel way more burnt out that the skier who can "surf" them. Since you've indicated that you feel OK after a groomer day, I'm going to guess that improving your tactics and technique will play the largest part in your development. 

 

Regarding your equipment: I'm guessing you're not on a slalom race ski. If you are, that'd affect your quad burn as well. 

 

Lastly, don't underestimate off-season or off-snow conditioning. I hate conditioning, so I always underestimate it. :duck: (Do as I say, not as I do)

 

Let us know how it goes!

post #3 of 4
I'm not an instructor or even particularly competent. But I just resolved my intense quad and calf pain issue by getting new boots with a more upright stance. now I feel able to easily carry a more correct stance without feeling intense quad pain. Do you have large calves as well, that was part of my issue. Take Care.
post #4 of 4
Quote:
 I'm not an instructor or even particularly competent. But I just resolved my intense quad and calf pain issue by getting new boots with a more upright stance.

Ditto on all points. Just taking a little doohickey out of the back of my boot that gave me the tiniest bit of forward lean made all the difference. Those shims behind the calves are a nonstarter for me--I'd be in such pain. Get rid of it and see how it goes!

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