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Dalbello vs Rossignol

post #1 of 24
Thread Starter 

Hello people, i am about to buy my 1st pair of boots. I live in Serbia and we have very limited choice over here and very limited money (our average pay is 300e a month). Currently there are great discount ove here and my choice is limted between Dalbello Blaze, Dalbello Aspect and Rossignol Alltrack Pro. All boots have flex of 100, i am indermediate skiier with around 200lbs 6'0. I am trying to find reviews for these Dalbello boots but cant find any and price is around 150e which is really great. I would appreciate if someone who had experience with these Dalbello boots gave me a quick review. Thank you in advance :)

post #2 of 24
If they fit, that's probably a good price. If they don't fit, the price doesn't matter. Go to the "Ask the Boot Guys" forum and read he wikis about fitting and terminology. That will give you a good idea of how they should fit. Then go try them on and buy the one that fits your foot best.
post #3 of 24

Ski boot fit is more critical than hiking boots or any other type of footwear.  Without trying it on first you will probably buy something that will never work properly, plus liners are moldable but you shouldn't do it yourself unless you know what you are doing.  Wait till you are in an area where you can do this.  Any other type of ski equipment you can buy online... but not boots.

post #4 of 24
Thread Starter 

I never thought buying them online. I will go personally to the store and i hope that they have bootfitter there.. i just hoped for personal experiences of people actually skiing with boots i mentioned. Stores in US have bootfitter working for them or..?

post #5 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buncha90 View Post
 

I never thought buying them online. I will go personally to the store and i hope that they have bootfitter there.. i just hoped for personal experiences of people actually skiing with boots i mentioned. Stores in US have bootfitter working for them or..?

Some ski shops in the US have boot fitters, but most do not.  If they ask what size shoe you wear you are not likely dealing with a boot fitter.  I work part time in a shop and have fitted many people with boots.  We never ask about shoe size.  We measure and we do a shell fit.

post #6 of 24
Thread Starter 

Well i guess i will have to fit my boots by myself since i have never heard of boot fitting job here in serbia. I wouldnt even know how to translate it. I will probably just read few tips about boot fitting and try on my own..

post #7 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buncha90 View Post
 

Well i guess i will have to fit my boots by myself since i have never heard of boot fitting job here in serbia. I wouldnt even know how to translate it. I will probably just read few tips about boot fitting and try on my own..


IMHO, if you read and follow all the advice about boot fitting on here and then fit yourself, you will have a better fit than most skiers who go to shops to get fitted.  Good luck.

post #8 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buncha90 View Post
 

 my choice is limted between Dalbello Blaze, Dalbello Aspect and Rossignol Alltrack Pro. 

 

As mentioned, fit is the most important factor and be aware that dalbello offer models with two to three "last" size but I'm not sure about Rossignol. The point being if the two Dabello boot does not fit you may find another boot with a different last. The Aspect is a cabrio design, it is meant to give a natural or progressive fore/aft flex. In addition, Dalbello adds more hard shell plastic to add lateral stiffness in their cabrio design. The other two are the traditional two piece design. IMO, the difference between the two approaches depends on what you like to ski and how you like to ski them. 

post #9 of 24
Thread Starter 

thank you for your reply. i am just standard self thought skiier. i like to jump here and there but i mainly just go average speed all the time. i guess i will just try which gonna fit me best and buy that one. Actually if none of those fits me i will probably try atomic redster pro 90 and salomon x max 100.. salomon are a bit more expensive and atomic have 90 flex while i think 100 would be better for me but if 1st three dont fit i will try them aswell

post #10 of 24
At your size a 90 flex boot is too soft. There is no objective standard for measuring flex. One Dalbello 100 flex boot may or may not be as stiff as a different model Dalbello 100 flex boot and will probably not feel the same as an Atomic 100 flex boot or a Salomon 100 flex boot. If you came into our shop I would not bring out anything less than 120 to start
post #11 of 24
Thread Starter 

to be honest 120 boots are expensive for me. i mean there is one solid offer but i am scared that 120 is going to be too stiff since i always took rented boots and their flex was probably at 80 or less and they were really used at least 10 years or more. Even then i had numbness and a small pain here and there. i will try to find a bootfitter over here..

post #12 of 24

If you do wind up having to fit yourself keep in mind a few things. The liners will pack out over the first 5 days or so, so a boot that feels great in the shop will be too loose after skiing a few days. The boots should be very snug in the shop, although not painful. It is easier to relieve painful spots in a tight fitting boot than to fix a boot that is too large. Make sure you look up shell fitting. And a stiff boot can be made softer but a soft boot can't be made stiffer. Unfortunately fixing painful spots does require a boot fitter; you can probably figure out how to soften a stiff pair by researching on line. And you should try on the boots wearing an ultrathin ski sock if you can; thick socks do little to keep you warm and just make the fit sloppy. And ideally you want a boot that fits well without having to crank down on the buckles.

post #13 of 24
Thread Starter 

Yeah i read some instructions here and i dont understand completely yet. i will try to find a video of proper boot fitting 

post #14 of 24

pozz, javite ako treba jasnije

post #15 of 24
Thread Starter 

Thank you all for your replies. I finally got some time and went to the store and tried 2 pair of boots. It loos like my number is 26.5 but my foot is very wide. I tried 27.0 Dalbello Avanti and felt that they are a little bit big and 26.5 Dalbello Panterra fitted perfectly but i felt numbness  and strong pushing from the sides while i could lift my heel a little bit which is a bad thing. Tomorrow i am going to try Dalbello Avanti 26.5  and Dalbello Aspect 26.5 To be hones i dont feel very positive since Dalbello Panterra last is 102mm which is widest boot i saw.. I mean does that last actually means something? if does i guess there is no boot for me

post #16 of 24

You mentioned the Salomon X Max 100.  It is a 98 last, which is narrow and not good for your wide feet. BUT, it has a heat moldable shell, which can add 6mm to the width.  The problem is that it requires a special oven and skill in molding the shell.  Otherwise you will probably end up with a useless boot. So I would stay away from that boot.

post #17 of 24
GO TO A BOOTFITTER. It is not that hard to make a boot wider. But it takes a decent fitter. A good fitter will also tell you what stiffness you need.
post #18 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

GO TO A BOOTFITTER. It is not that hard to make a boot wider. But it takes a decent fitter. A good fitter will also tell you what stiffness you need.

 

There aren't any proper ones - he'd have to go to Slovenia, Austria or Italy.

post #19 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Buncha90 View Post
 

Thank you all for your replies. I finally got some time and went to the store and tried 2 pair of boots. It loos like my number is 26.5 but my foot is very wide. I tried 27.0 Dalbello Avanti and felt that they are a little bit big and 26.5 Dalbello Panterra fitted perfectly but i felt numbness  and strong pushing from the sides while i could lift my heel a little bit which is a bad thing. Tomorrow i am going to try Dalbello Avanti 26.5  and Dalbello Aspect 26.5 To be hones i dont feel very positive since Dalbello Panterra last is 102mm which is widest boot i saw.. I mean does that last actually means something? if does i guess there is no boot for me

 

 

Yeah, the loose heel is bad. If you run out of luck on the other boots and If you can't find a local bootfitter, one option is try a heel lift. I use them b/c of volume reasons. 

post #20 of 24
Thread Starter 

so i went to another shop today and tried salomon x pro 90. They actually fit me very well. Heel isnt going up and even though i have wide foot they are 104mm wide and i dont feel too much pressure on the side even when i squeze them on maximum. So as i said my body mass is around 200-210lb without any equpiment. My question is is this 90 flex enough for me being intermediate skier? or should i go with salomon x pro 100? they are 50e more expensive :/

post #21 of 24

You can make a boot softer, you can not make a boot stiffer.

post #22 of 24
Thread Starter 

yes i know that and that is why i have such a hard time. i actually feel really good in this x pro 90. i am just hoping that it will be able to hold me for next 5 years 7 - 10 days a year since i dont ski more than that.. i am preparing to do my whole 1 month wage for boots so i am having really hard time ;D

post #23 of 24

I think they are too wide -

Quote:
Originally Posted by Buncha90 View Postt they are 104mm wide and i dont feel too much pressure on the side even when i squeze them on maximum.

 

In a properly fitting boot you should feel too much pressure when squeezing on maximum.     Not painful when buckled all the way means they will be loose and hard to control in 2 weeks.

I think you need to do a shell fit.

post #24 of 24
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

I think they are too wide -

 

In a properly fitting boot you should feel too much pressure when squeezing on maximum.     Not painful when buckled all the way means they will be loose and hard to control in 2 weeks.

I think you need to do a shell fit.


This.

 

By a shell fit, he means take out the liner, put your foot in, move it until your toes are up against the front of the shell. You should have about 12-18 mm of space behind the heel. Now check the sides. The widest part of your foot at the ball should be between just touching and a couple of mm between it and the shell. If you have access to a real fitter, they can blow out the front plastic and add several mm to the shell width, so go with a snugger fit. If you don't, make sure you have a few mm between you and the shell in width. 

 

More generally: Yes 90 is too soft a flex for you. My 13 year old, who weighs 96 lbs, uses a 90 flex boot. My wife, who weighs 135-140, uses a 110. I weigh 165 and use a 120 or 130, depending. So I'd say a 110 is a minimum for you. 

 

Also, try on a pair of Langes or Rossignols (same boot, different colors and trim). The rec versions are narrow in the heels and roomy in the front, come in widths of 100 and 102. 

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