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Getting a resort dialed in vs "Ski tourism" - Page 2

post #31 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance View Post
 

I am sure you are an absolutely awesome skier, just as you proudly point out in your post.  You may well be the Jordan Spieth of skiing for all I know, but I will just have to take your word for it.

 

My point, in the context of the topic of this thread, was that focusing on mastering one run (or one ski mountain) can give someone a false sense of how well they may be able to ski elsewhere in comparison.  Witness skiers who have mastered all of the double black diamond runs at Mount Cow Pie back home in Iowa coming west to the Rockies thinking they can ski anything on the mountain. Or skiers who are experts on the ice on Mt. Glacier in Vermont coming to the PNW to ski Sierra cement. It is totally a different issue of whether one is a "good" skier or not. World class experts like Jordan Spieth (or you) can do well in their specialty anywhere they go, but most mortals in either sport in the real world are not at that elite level.


I'm sure any of my normal ski friends have no issues when going out west. I have skied a few of the steeper runs in the west the steepest is 59* and figured out after the first turn, hey this is just short radius turns. We've hiked to the bowls at Crested Butt when we spent a week there. Did that daily for that week, even hiked to the T bar when it was to windy for the lift other lift to take us there. 

 

Granted I'm not talking cliff jumping, just expert terrain. I may be have to agree with your statement about skiers in the mid west with a hill with 3-500 ft of vert. But here in New England we get all the snow conditions, from blue ice to heavy Spring crud. We have big enough mt's with long enough trails to ski a few miles before you stop.

 

If your serious about your skiing, there isn't much you can't ski.

post #32 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 


I'm sure any of my normal ski friends have no issues when going out west. I have skied a few of the steeper runs in the west the steepest is 59* and figured out after the first turn, hey this is just short radius turns. We've hiked to the bowls at Crested Butt when we spent a week there. Did that daily for that week, even hiked to the T bar when it was to windy for the lift other lift to take us there. 

 

Granted I'm not talking cliff jumping, just expert terrain. I may be have to agree with your statement about skiers in the mid west with a hill with 3-500 ft of vert. But here in New England we get all the snow conditions, from blue ice to heavy Spring crud. We have big enough mt's with long enough trails to ski a few miles before you stop.

 

If your serious about your skiing, there isn't much you can't ski.

 

Unless you're from the Mid-west, right?   Then you just suck ass...  Apparently...

 

Not you though..

post #33 of 53

A few years ago I was lucky enough to get a Yeti Pass, good for one day at every resort in Utah. They were sold out, but I got on the waiting list and eventually was able to purchase one. It was awesome. I'm sure that without it, I'd never have visited places like Sundance and Eagle Point.

 

So given a choice between the following 7-day trips...

 

1) AltaBird, Brighton, Solitude, PCMR, Deer Valley, Snowbasin, PowMow

2) AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird

 

... I'd take Choice #1 in an instant. Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't even describe how one-sided that decision would be for me.

post #34 of 53

I can't think of anything more boring than skiing one resort day after day. The new

passes like the Mountain Collective motivate people to explore new areas. 

post #35 of 53

I notice that my technique tends to fall apart when skiing difficult runs at new areas--runs not as hard as what i confidently ski at home. Lack of confidence I guess.

post #36 of 53
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by 50kVert View Post
 

A few years ago I was lucky enough to get a Yeti Pass, good for one day at every resort in Utah. They were sold out, but I got on the waiting list and eventually was able to purchase one. It was awesome. I'm sure that without it, I'd never have visited places like Sundance and Eagle Point.

 

So given a choice between the following 7-day trips...

 

1) AltaBird, Brighton, Solitude, PCMR, Deer Valley, Snowbasin, PowMow

2) AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird, AltaBird

 

... I'd take Choice #1 in an instant. Maybe I'm in the minority, but I can't even describe how one-sided that decision would be for me.


Fair enough.  Here's my take on it, and what I actually did over the last 4 years.  The trajectory is pretty clear.

 

Year 1 trip: AltaBird, Solitude, PCMR, rest day, Deer Valley, Snowbasin, PowMow, repeat

 

Year 2 trip: AltaBird, AltaBird, Solitude, AltaBird, rest day, Deer Valley, AltaBird, PowMow, AltaBird, Solitude, AltaBird, AltaBird, Solitude, AltaBird

 

Year 3 trip: AltaBird x4, rest day, AltaBird x4, rest day, AltaBird x3, Deer Valley, rest day, AltaBird x2, Solitude, AltaBird x3, Solitude,

 

Year 4 (moved to SLC): AltaBird, day off, AltaBird, repeat until....  ?

 

It was only towards the end of year 3 that I was strong enough to really do the 'flow skiing' thing and really keep up with my buddy.  He was a private guide/instructor at Alta for the last 25 years and knows AltaBird like the back of his hand.  That's when the light bulb finally went off.  At this point there's not much reason to head to PC or PowMow any more.  Maybe Solitude from time to time or if it snows on a weekend and AltaBird is too much of a zoo.

post #37 of 53
Quote:
Or skiers who are experts on the ice on Mt. Glacier in Vermont coming to the PNW to ski Sierra cement.

They would be sorely disappointed.  Sierra Cement is not native to the PNW, Cascade Concrete is.

post #38 of 53
Ufda!
post #39 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I notice that my technique tends to fall apart when skiing difficult runs at new areas--runs not as hard as what i confidently ski at home. Lack of confidence I guess.

Lack of familiarity rather, as anyone who has skied much knows very well. Thought this was the point of the thread. You're right, of course.
post #40 of 53

I think it's a balance.

 

FWIW, I've heard with regards to learning in school, students perform better on tests/retention when the subject matter is interweaved rather than taught in continuous blocks, and that students can get a false sense of their knowledge if they read over a passage multiple times. 

post #41 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by focker View Post
 

 

Unless you're from the Mid-west, right?   Then you just suck ass...  Apparently...

 

Not you though..


Amazing how easy it now day's to offend someone. Just saying...

post #42 of 53

Both.

 

Prior to having a season pass, I used to ski about 10 days a year. It's fun checking out different mountains and scenes.

 

Now that we have a pass and a place to stay, it's nice getting a mountain dialed in, especially as you get older and you're not going to take your kids into the woods or drop 12 feet until you're comfortable with the terrain and conditions.  If I had more time and money, it would still be fun to hit Magic or slidebrook on a powder day, or sharpen the p50s and go supersonic at Cannon.

 

Of course you can ski Alta and bird all year, but honeycomb canyon is like mineral basin with less people.

post #43 of 53

I'm impressed. Your home Mountain is Okemo and you ski at the same speed or faster and even better at Sugarloaf? The mountains are like a mouse to a lion in comparison.

Next time try skiing the upper half of Sugarloaf or ski with better skiers.

post #44 of 53

I like this question so I am not giving it my usual flip sarcastic reply.

In my opinion, the skiing is best where you know the mountain and all it's subtleties and where to go to what part of the mountain and when. I've done many trips over the years with the intent of hitting multiple resorts over many days just to say you skied them. It always felt flat because I felt like a tourist shopping at some Carrib Isle coming off a tour boat.

The best ski trips I've ever done were staying at one resort...getting to know it and MAYBE doing a side trip elsewhere.

Over and Out...

post #45 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I notice that my technique tends to fall apart when skiing difficult runs at new areas--runs not as hard as what i confidently ski at home. Lack of confidence I guess.

Actually, I think you're probably a conscientious skier. You recognise that you don't know all the areas skiers might pop out of. Good for you.
post #46 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I notice that my technique tends to fall apart when skiing difficult runs at new areas--runs not as hard as what i confidently ski at home. Lack of confidence I guess.

Actually, I think you're probably a conscientious skier. You recognise that you don't know all the areas skiers might pop out of. Good for you.

More like I don't know all the places trees and rocks and cliffs and ice might pop out of.

post #47 of 53
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

I notice that my technique tends to fall apart when skiing difficult runs at new areas--runs not as hard as what i confidently ski at home. Lack of confidence I guess.

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

More like I don't know all the places trees and rocks and cliffs and ice might pop out of.

This.

 

 

 

I completely share the sentiment of which OP speaks. I'd rather spend a couple days at a resort and get some hard/techy lines dialed in because they are way better when you can ski them fluidly. Last season I had 1 day at Alta and 2 at Solitude on my trip. One day at Alta was painful, there was so much stuff there with blind airs, exposed rocks, etc. that I never felt confident skiing a lot of terrain for the first time. Couple that with skiing with a party and bopping all over the place, it wasn't all that fun IMO. I would have rather just skied Solitude for three days. 

post #48 of 53

 

My "local " hangout (Whistler) has enough terrain to keep me happy if it was all I skied 

Have a lot of years on that hill. But also have been taking road trips though out the NW to many other hills for just as long.

Our road trips are almost always a different hill per day. Staying at the same location longer than 2 days means either the snow is exceptional or the drive to the next isn't going to be.  Guess that makes me a tourist but I have never noticed any change in my skiing hill to hill.

Those trips are usually the high point of my season even when the skiing isn't as good as the local hill. A change of scenery never hurts.

.   

  

   

post #49 of 53

I'm amazed at how entertained I remain after skiing at my hill (Mt. Baker) as much as I do.  The place isn't big at 1000 acres but it has a seemingly infinite way to string things together to make new runs every time.  Our terrain is quite varied so even a single named run can give you several different looks depending on how you approach it.  I have found that the more intimately I know the terrain the more fun I have.  Also, the snow conditions around here are usually changing during the day so that the same run can seem completely different depending on the time of day you ski it.

post #50 of 53

$.02 here.  Just returned from a "ski tour" of Crested Butte and Telluride.  My ski buddies and I got into some areas where none of us had ever skied.  They were halfway into some steep terrain or trees with deep snow and "the light went on."  They had no idea what they were getting into; were adventurous enough to take on a challenge; and they skied better after they got part of the way into the run. Was pleased to see the grins on their faces. Very satisfying...

post #51 of 53

Another story from last weekend, why its great to have a resort dialed in.

 

One of the local shops was having a demo day last Saturday. I ski up about 11AM looking for a somebody I knew. The next thing I hear is the shop owners voice calling me by name and saying, "have I got the ski for you" He went in behind the rack and pulled out the Enforcer 93, I said, you must have read my mind, that's why I'm here. I noticed they had a little surface rust on one edge. He said, we don't let that ski out much its only for the people we know because its next years and we don't want it damaged.

 

When the girl asked for my CC#, he said, that's ok, I know where he lives.

 

There really are many benefits to skiing at one place for over 25 years.

post #52 of 53
All this statement needs is a few tweaks and it could equally apply to a long time lover :-)
Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

I'm amazed at how entertained I remain after skiing at my hill (Mt. Baker) as much as I do.  The place isn't big at 1000 acres but it has a seemingly infinite way to string things together to make new runs every time.  Our terrain is quite varied so even a single named run can give you several different looks depending on how you approach it.  I have found that the more intimately I know the terrain the more fun I have.  Also, the snow conditions around here are usually changing during the day so that the same run can seem completely different depending on the time of day you ski it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

I'm amazed at how entertained I remain after skiing at my hill (Mt. Baker) as much as I do.  The place isn't big at 1000 acres but it has a seemingly infinite way to string things together to make new runs every time.  Our terrain is quite varied so even a single named run can give you several different looks depending on how you approach it.  I have found that the more intimately I know the terrain the more fun I have.  Also, the snow conditions around here are usually changing during the day so that the same run can seem completely different depending on the time of day you ski it.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Posaune View Post

I'm amazed at how entertained I remain after skiing at my hill (Mt. Baker) as much as I do.  The place isn't big at 1000 acres but it has a seemingly infinite way to string things together to make new runs every time.  Our terrain is quite varied so even a single named run can give you several different looks depending on how you approach it.  I have found that the more intimately I know the terrain the more fun I have.  Also, the snow conditions around here are usually changing during the day so that the same run can seem completely different depending on the time of day you ski it.

post #53 of 53
Oops, ménage à trois :-)
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