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Ski in Niseko Japan - MA request

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

Hi anyone. I share my new videos.:)

 

This is my new action, Have any opinion?Thanks!

 

Norman

 

 

 

 


Edited by norman - 2/6/16 at 5:38pm
post #2 of 11

If 2006 is "new" then I'd hate to see what "old" means :rolleyes

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gunnerbob View Post
 

If 2006 is "new" then I'd hate to see what "old" means :rolleyes

 

Haha ...:rotflmao:

I was wrong a year.

It has now been corrected.

Thanks for reminding.

 

Norman

post #4 of 11

Hi norman, 

 

I'm surprised you haven't gotten any feedback! Well, I'll start, and then you're guaranteed to get a deluge of feedback thereafter, since many people at epicski can't let an assessment just sit unchallenged. :duck:

 

Good turns happen from a centered and mobile stance. I notice you ski much better on flatter pitches. Your skis turn through the arc, and you tend to be centered front to back over the ski. This falls apart on steeper pitches; E.g. around 1:27, you twist your skis quickly through the arc, and your weight is far back. (You can see the ski tips come off the snow.) These actions are a fear response, so for now you're better developing your skiing on flatter pitches and gradually moving to steeper runs. 

 

When you go back to the flatter pitches, you'll want to change the way you create turns. Right now, you turn by stepping up, moving your chest into the arc, and then your skis are forced to come around. There are at least four problems with this move:

  1. Because you move into the turn, your body gets stuck up the hill by the end of the turn--you end your turn with all your weight on the inside of the turn and you have no grip through the second half of the turn
  2. Your feet are at the mercy of your upper body. You lose any ability to turn quickly. 
  3. There's no power in your turns because you're moving away from the ski, losing pressure at a critical point. 
  4. The stepping motion and change in pressure will make it hard to maintain grip in icy conditions. 

 

I'd like to see you rebuild the way you turn so that your ankles, legs, and hip are doing the work, rather than your chest. In advanced skiing, you tip the skis on their edges, and balance over your outside ski. Your chest, in contrast, will wind and unwind slower than your legs. There is no stepping up to get off the edges. See these screenshots for an example of the legs turning more than the chest. Pay attention to where his belly button is throughout the turn (ie it points towards the outside of the turn): 

 

  

 

At an even higher performance level, I'd look for you to gradually shorten the inside leg, and gradually lengthen the outside leg until you get to the turn apex. From there, reverse the movement - shorten the outside leg, start lengthening the inside leg. Your legs should be constantly getting longer or shorter with no stops in between. 

 

If we had a lesson in person, I'd work with you on rolling skis on edge, balancing on the outside edge, quieting your upper body, and learning to create natural separation (turning the lower joints while not letting your upper body come around as much).  

 

Fan Progression

Find a quiet green run with no traffic uphill. Traverse across the hill. Balance over your downhill ski, and let your belly button/hips point towards the tip of the downhill ski. Flatten your skis until they turn just a bit downhill, then roll the skis on edge using your ankles. You should leave pencil mark tracks in the snow. Your entire upper body should be still throughout the exercise (no stepping up, no twisting). 

Repeat, letting your skis point a bit further downhill each time before tipping the skis up on edge. The rolling should happen gradually and constantly (ie you shouldn't get stopped rolling). 

 

Rollerblade Turns

Once you can do a fan progression and leave clean tracks, move onto rollerblade turns.

Find another quiet green run that's almost flat. Point your skis straight downhill. begin rolling the ankles to leave pencil line S tracks in the snow behind you. 

This video presents a decent approximation: 

As you accumulate more speed in this exercise, start thinking about letting the inside leg come up towards your chest, and the outside leg get longer. Both legs should be in constant motion, either getting longer or shorter. 

 

Thousand Steps

This exercise will help you learn to balance on the edge, and reinforce your carving. Video here: 

 

 

The Wall

Just saw this now but it will help you to work on steering with your legs rather than with your chest.

 

Knees and Armpits

As you become able to tip skis on edge, you'll want to work on getting the inside leg short and lengthening the outside leg. This exercise will help you do so.

 

Good luck!

post #5 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Hi norman, 

 

I'm surprised you haven't gotten any feedback! Well, I'll start, and then you're guaranteed to get a deluge of feedback thereafter, since many people at epicski can't let an assessment just sit unchallenged. :duck:

 

Good turns happen from a centered and mobile stance. I notice you ski much better on flatter pitches. Your skis turn through the arc, and you tend to be centered front to back over the ski. This falls apart on steeper pitches; E.g. around 1:27, you twist your skis quickly through the arc, and your weight is far back. (You can see the ski tips come off the snow.) These actions are a fear response, so for now you're better developing your skiing on flatter pitches and gradually moving to steeper runs. 

 

When you go back to the flatter pitches, you'll want to change the way you create turns. Right now, you turn by stepping up, moving your chest into the arc, and then your skis are forced to come around. There are at least four problems with this move:

  1. Because you move into the turn, your body gets stuck up the hill by the end of the turn--you end your turn with all your weight on the inside of the turn and you have no grip through the second half of the turn
  2. Your feet are at the mercy of your upper body. You lose any ability to turn quickly. 
  3. There's no power in your turns because you're moving away from the ski, losing pressure at a critical point. 
  4. The stepping motion and change in pressure will make it hard to maintain grip in icy conditions. 

 

I'd like to see you rebuild the way you turn so that your ankles, legs, and hip are doing the work, rather than your chest. In advanced skiing, you tip the skis on their edges, and balance over your outside ski. Your chest, in contrast, will wind and unwind slower than your legs. There is no stepping up to get off the edges. See these screenshots for an example of the legs turning more than the chest. Pay attention to where his belly button is throughout the turn (ie it points towards the outside of the turn): 

 

  

 

At an even higher performance level, I'd look for you to gradually shorten the inside leg, and gradually lengthen the outside leg until you get to the turn apex. From there, reverse the movement - shorten the outside leg, start lengthening the inside leg. Your legs should be constantly getting longer or shorter with no stops in between. 

 

If we had a lesson in person, I'd work with you on rolling skis on edge, balancing on the outside edge, quieting your upper body, and learning to create natural separation (turning the lower joints while not letting your upper body come around as much).  

 

Fan Progression

Find a quiet green run with no traffic uphill. Traverse across the hill. Balance over your downhill ski, and let your belly button/hips point towards the tip of the downhill ski. Flatten your skis until they turn just a bit downhill, then roll the skis on edge using your ankles. You should leave pencil mark tracks in the snow. Your entire upper body should be still throughout the exercise (no stepping up, no twisting). 

Repeat, letting your skis point a bit further downhill each time before tipping the skis up on edge. The rolling should happen gradually and constantly (ie you shouldn't get stopped rolling). 

 

Rollerblade Turns

Once you can do a fan progression and leave clean tracks, move onto rollerblade turns.

Find another quiet green run that's almost flat. Point your skis straight downhill. begin rolling the ankles to leave pencil line S tracks in the snow behind you. 

This video presents a decent approximation: 

As you accumulate more speed in this exercise, start thinking about letting the inside leg come up towards your chest, and the outside leg get longer. Both legs should be in constant motion, either getting longer or shorter. 

 

Thousand Steps

This exercise will help you learn to balance on the edge, and reinforce your carving. Video here: 

 

 

The Wall

Just saw this now but it will help you to work on steering with your legs rather than with your chest.

 

Knees and Armpits

As you become able to tip skis on edge, you'll want to work on getting the inside leg short and lengthening the outside leg. This exercise will help you do so.

 

Good luck!

 

Hi Metaphor:

Thank you for your really good detailed instructions and insights.Thumbs Up

 

Norman

post #6 of 11

bump

post #7 of 11
Liquidfeet, what are your thoughts?
post #8 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

Hi norman, 

I'm surprised you haven't gotten any feedback! Well, I'll start, and then you're guaranteed to get a deluge of feedback thereafter, since many people at epicski can't let an assessment just sit unchallenged. duck.gif

Good turns happen from a centered and mobile stance. I notice you ski much better on flatter pitches. Your skis turn through the arc, and you tend to be centered front to back over the ski. This falls apart on steeper pitches; E.g. around 1:27, you twist your skis quickly through the arc, and your weight is far back. (You can see the ski tips come off the snow.) These actions are a fear response, so for now you're better developing your skiing on flatter pitches and gradually moving to steeper runs. 

When you go back to the flatter pitches, you'll want to change the way you create turns. Right now, you turn by stepping up, moving your chest into the arc, and then your skis are forced to come around. There are at least four problems with this move:
  1. Because you move into the turn, your body gets stuck up the hill by the end of the turn--you end your turn with all your weight on the inside of the turn and you have no grip through the second half of the turn
  2. Your feet are at the mercy of your upper body. You lose any ability to turn quickly. 
  3. There's no power in your turns because you're moving away from the ski, losing pressure at a critical point. 
  4. The stepping motion and change in pressure will make it hard to maintain grip in icy conditions. 

I'd like to see you rebuild the way you turn so that your ankles, legs, and hip are doing the work, rather than your chest. In advanced skiing, you tip the skis on their edges, and balance over your outside ski. Your chest, in contrast, will wind and unwind slower than your legs. There is no stepping up to get off the edges. See these screenshots for an example of the legs turning more than the chest. Pay attention to where his belly button is throughout the turn (ie it points towards the outside of the turn): 


 
 


At an even higher performance level, I'd look for you to gradually shorten the inside leg, and gradually lengthen the outside leg until you get to the turn apex. From there, reverse the movement - shorten the outside leg, start lengthening the inside leg. Your legs should be constantly getting longer or shorter with no stops in between. 

If we had a lesson in person, I'd work with you on rolling skis on edge, balancing on the outside edge, quieting your upper body, and learning to create natural separation (turning the lower joints while not letting your upper body come around as much).  

Fan Progression
Find a quiet green run with no traffic uphill. Traverse across the hill. Balance over your downhill ski, and let your belly button/hips point towards the tip of the downhill ski. Flatten your skis until they turn just a bit downhill, then roll the skis on edge using your ankles. You should leave pencil mark tracks in the snow. Your entire upper body should be still throughout the exercise (no stepping up, no twisting). 
Repeat, letting your skis point a bit further downhill each time before tipping the skis up on edge. The rolling should happen gradually and constantly (ie you shouldn't get stopped rolling). 

Rollerblade Turns
Once you can do a fan progression and leave clean tracks, move onto rollerblade turns.
Find another quiet green run that's almost flat. Point your skis straight downhill. begin rolling the ankles to leave pencil line S tracks in the snow behind you. 
This video presents a decent approximation: 


As you accumulate more speed in this exercise, start thinking about letting the inside leg come up towards your chest, and the outside leg get longer. Both legs should be in constant motion, either getting longer or shorter. 

Thousand Steps
This exercise will help you learn to balance on the edge, and reinforce your carving. Video here: 




The Wall
Just saw this now but it will help you to work on steering with your legs rather than with your chest.



Knees and Armpits
As you become able to tip skis on edge, you'll want to work on getting the inside leg short and lengthening the outside leg. This exercise will help you do so.



Good luck!

Norman just got about $10k worth of free stuff here.

Outstanding !!
post #9 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hrstrat57 View Post


Norman just got about $10k worth of free stuff here.

Outstanding !!

Wow! It's great.Thumbs Up

I earn big!:beercheer:

 

Norman:D

post #10 of 11

Hi Norman. Great skiing. Didn't have time to read Metaphors posting but saw it was extensive. Good for you. Anyway, I like the fact that you are up-unweighting your parallel turns and doing a pretty good job at it. Nice carve at 1:09. Your best skiing was at 1:52. I really liked that. Smooth and controlled.

 

When you are skiing in crud type terrain as you were doing in the video you should try to get a stronger up and down and forward momentum going. Bend a bit more in your knees and angulate. Also, try to make your pole plant more determined for a more solid look. Nice video filming and edit. Like a short movie. Thanks for posting.

 

Tom

post #11 of 11
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 

Hi Norman. Great skiing. Didn't have time to read Metaphors posting but saw it was extensive. Good for you. Anyway, I like the fact that you are up-unweighting your parallel turns and doing a pretty good job at it. Nice carve at 1:09. Your best skiing was at 1:52. I really liked that. Smooth and controlled.

 

When you are skiing in crud type terrain as you were doing in the video you should try to get a stronger up and down and forward momentum going. Bend a bit more in your knees and angulate. Also, try to make your pole plant more determined for a more solid look. Nice video filming and edit. Like a short movie. Thanks for posting.

 

Tom

 

Hi Tom:

Thanks many for your like and  opinion.I like it. Thumbs Up:beercheer:

 

Norman

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