or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › The difference between drills and gates
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

The difference between drills and gates

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I find videos of ski racers practicing very interesting. To see what and how they practise and then maybe see what it looks like on the course. Not to mention in a race. Check out this video and give me your thoughts.

 

post #2 of 13

All good drills to get the fundamentals wired: quiet upper body, early outside edge, bend the tip to start the turn, pressure predominantly on the outside ski. So he has all that wired when he gets into the gates so he can just focus on tactics...

post #3 of 13

Sorry to go off topic by the third post, but... why is he doing such a large up-unweight on each exercise? I thought the premise these days is an up-unweight disrupts your pressure.

 

Second question: what is the purpose of each of the pole passing exercises? I recognize the value in some of them to cue upper body alignment, but not most of them.

 

It was neat to see him use varied terrain. 

post #4 of 13
Horrible sound track.
post #5 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Sorry to go off topic by the third post, but... why is he doing such a large up-unweight on each exercise? I thought the premise these days is an up-unweight disrupts your pressure.

 

Second question: what is the purpose of each of the pole passing exercises? I recognize the value in some of them to cue upper body alignment, but not most of them.

 

It was neat to see him use varied terrain. 


I don't think it's as up and down as you might think. He's getting a good release at the end of the turn and moving through neutral and moving his mass down the fall line is how it looks to me. The pole from one hand to the other is a variation of an up and over drill we do, the variant is passing it behind the back...

post #6 of 13

He's literally standing up between turns. Look at all this standing: 

 

    

 

    

 

These transitions are the polar opposite of flexing to release. Contrast with transitions by my favourite skier: 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I'm not saying one or the other is wrong. The guy's clearly a great skier and much better than me. But the racer's standing is highly apparent, particularly if you contrast with a flex to release. So my question remains: why the extend to release when everything I've heard recently is that extending disrupts your snow contact compared to flexing to release? 

post #7 of 13

The helmet is really weird and distracting honestly... who came up with that helmet design? I kept thinking I'm looking at the rare footage of C3PO skiing...

 

post #8 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Second question: what is the purpose of each of the pole passing exercises? I recognize the value in some of them to cue upper body alignment, but not most of them.

 

It was neat to see him use varied terrain. 

 

The pole passing is usually to add more distraction to the task, get them thinking and dealing with more variation, external focus of attention.

 

Tying it to certain places in the turn is good as well. Passing it behind the back and front is also good. Then front and back etc.

post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by razie View Post
 

The helmet is really weird and distracting honestly... who came up with that helmet design? I kept thinking I'm looking at the rare footage of C3PO skiing...

 

 

That's probably a downhill helmet meant to be worn horizontally :) 


Edited by tdk6 - 2/4/16 at 2:44am
post #10 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post
 

Sorry to go off topic by the third post, but... why is he doing such a large up-unweight on each exercise? I thought the premise these days is an up-unweight disrupts your pressure.

 

Second question: what is the purpose of each of the pole passing exercises? I recognize the value in some of them to cue upper body alignment, but not most of them.

 

It was neat to see him use varied terrain. 

 

You are not hijacking the thread at all. On the contrary. You are picking up on the exact same thing I did. The skier is an Hungarian young FIS racer. Unlike anybody else on this forum this guy can ski for real. Only, kidding, we are great also, but my point being that this is racer that's young and up and coming and has received the latest of technique training from WC coaches on national teams. So presumably he knows what he is doing. Thanks for all the frame captures. Yes, he is extending at transition in the exact opposite way we have been told for the last 10y. Why?

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiRacer55 View Post
 


I don't think it's as up and down as you might think. He's getting a good release at the end of the turn and moving through neutral and moving his mass down the fall line is how it looks to me. The pole from one hand to the other is a variation of an up and over drill we do, the variant is passing it behind the back...

 

I don't quite agree. The up move is quite aggressive and very dominant. But maybe he is being filmed at a clinic together with younger skiers and simply doing all the same drills meant for much younger skiers. I think I can see them in the back ground. Also, in the gates he is moving quite a bit up and down in a ILE type of way.

 

Could the pole passing be something coupled to when he adds pressure to the skis? Looks that way to me.

post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by Metaphor_ View Post

 
Sorry to go off topic by the third post, but... why is he doing such a large up-unweight on each exercise? I thought the premise these days is an up-unweight disrupts your pressure.

Second question: what is the purpose of each of the pole passing exercises? I recognize the value in some of them to cue upper body alignment, but not most of them.

It was neat to see him use varied terrain. 

You are not hijacking the thread at all. On the contrary. You are picking up on the exact same thing I did. The skier is an Hungarian young FIS racer. Unlike anybody else on this forum this guy can ski for real. Only, kidding, we are great also, but my point being that this is racer that's young and up and coming and has received the latest of technique training from WC coaches on national teams. So presumably he knows what he is doing. Thanks for all the frame captures. Yes, he is extending at transition in the exact opposite way we have been told for the last 10y. Why?

Kidding or not, I suspect you just insulted some extremely good skiers (not to mention instructors and coaches) on this site.
post #13 of 13

I see some fantastic skiing there.

The pole pass is at where the gate would be and teaches that neat move good racers make to make sure you don't hook the gate with your arm when you are in the red zone.

And yes, he is using his full range of motion to accept the large forces that occur at the apex and establish his rhythm.

Not much is said about rhythm in the usual Epic technique discussions but it is critical in the gates.

You don't appreciate how important it is until a course setter puts in a strange gate and you have to adjust.

Complete range of motion coupled with active upper body and arm movement is a hallmark of modern race technique.

Note...I did not say that the upper body doesn't progress smoothly through the course, it is just that during a full tilt run the arms have a lot to do right at the gate.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › Ski Training and Pro Forums › Ski Instruction & Coaching › The difference between drills and gates