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Getting more nervous with each passing season- help! - Page 2

post #31 of 41

Loud powder...  often called ice ;-)

 

Lots of that around this morning in S VT. 

 

What to do? 

Think about what you might do to stop sliding down the hill with your skis side-ways to the direction of travel,  and making all that racket! 

What will allow you to follow the ski tips across the fall line.

The edges need to engage. roll the ankles, bend the knees, counter the upper body to face down hill, and keep those hands pointing to the end of your next turn! It takes a soft feel for just how much "position" effort is right.  There is a lot of "pressure" sensation on slick surfaces.

Then with the same soft feel, make a smooth turn trying to keep following your turn, tips to tails.

The "loud sound" will diminish by many decibels.  Your sense of control will amplify ten fold,  and you will be in command of your direction and velocity. (keep turning and following the tips,  and you will end up going up hill! Even on ice!  (if you get your edges working)

 

A wider trail helps with this effort,  ..... worth seeking out.  the methods apply to short turns too,  just a bit more critical of timing.

 

I skied a connector trail today that was blue ice from entrance to exit.  Not more than a couple of snow patches at the very edges.  The rope was pulled after that.  No place for "intermediates", and I certainly would not have wanted to pull a loaded sled down THAT!  Gravity being so persistent and all..;-) 

post #32 of 41

I get freaked out by people below me.  It's about the only thing I am overly cautious of while skiing.  I frequently will just stop and wait till it's clear below.  Frequently I am bringing up the rear of my group because I stopped to let someone slower clear out before I bomb down.  I've also got an irrational fear of heights, which can make for interesting chair/tram rides.  I just accept it, try not to look down, and try to think of something else.

 

Ice sucks, no way around that.  You get used to the noise though, even appreciate it for its ability to tell you where everyone is.

post #33 of 41
Actually if skied correctly ice is quiet. Your sharp steel edges etch into the ice.
post #34 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Actually if skied correctly ice is quiet. Your sharp steel edges etch into the ice.

Hmmm...  Correctly..???    now there is an ambiguous description....;-)

post #35 of 41
Not really. Years ago when skiing ice with a group of friends one remarked that he couldn't hear my skis. But eveyone elses made lots of noise. So don't be so quick to judge because you can't.
post #36 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by slider View Post

Not really. Years ago when skiing ice with a group of friends one remarked that he couldn't hear my skis. But eveyone elses made lots of noise. So don't be so quick to judge because you can't.

Please .. Help the OP out!  What is your method ?  "correctly" seems a bit open.

The sound reduction alone will be worth "hearing" about.

 

Gosh,  you must have something  special to offer,  everyone's skis but yours making "lots of noise" .

post #37 of 41

It is certainly not all mental.  It is the combination of correct technique and one's confidence in their technique.

 

First, consider the Skier's Paradox.  You need to be very aggressive in your movements to have the control to go as slowly as you want.  If you ski defensively, you'll take off like a shot.

 

Get Blakeslee's In The Yikes! Zone.  Read it and understand it.  Get instruction on pitches that do not scare you about the correct technique you need to remain in control.  Gradually work this technique up to steeper & steeper pitches.  One great point Blakeslee makes--challenge yourself on either technique or terrain but never both as you're learning.

 

It'll come.  Take it step by step.  Do not frighten yourself.  That just sets you back.

post #38 of 41
There's nothing special about it. Carve the skis on the ice.
post #39 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by SoftSnowGuy View Post
 

It is certainly not all mental.  It is the combination of correct technique and one's confidence in their technique.

 

First, consider the Skier's Paradox.  You need to be very aggressive in your movements to have the control to go as slowly as you want.  If you ski defensively, you'll take off like a shot.

 

Get Blakeslee's In The Yikes! Zone.  Read it and understand it.  Get instruction on pitches that do not scare you about the correct technique you need to remain in control.  Gradually work this technique up to steeper & steeper pitches.  One great point Blakeslee makes--challenge yourself on either technique or terrain but never both as you're learning.

 

It'll come.  Take it step by step.  Do not frighten yourself.  That just sets you back.


Great post,

 

I'm trying to think of something to say that might be of more help, but that post say's what most of us at the expert level have learned over the years.

post #40 of 41
Quote:
Originally Posted by gobbly View Post
 

I get freaked out by people below me.  It's about the only thing I am overly cautious of while skiing.  I frequently will just stop and wait till it's clear below.  Frequently I am bringing up the rear of my group because I stopped to let someone slower clear out before I bomb down.  I've also got an irrational fear of heights, which can make for interesting chair/tram rides.  I just accept it, try not to look down, and try to think of something else.

 

Ice sucks, no way around that.  You get used to the noise though, even appreciate it for its ability to tell you where everyone is.


I can totally relate to your fear of heights.  I had the same issue.  When I first started skiing I was more terrified of the lift than skiing out of control down a steep slope.  As my skiing improved so did my enjoyment of the downhill part of skiing.  I just kept telling myself about the fun I would soon be having once I reached the top.  That got me through the lift ride.  Now I ride most chair lifts, with or without the bar, somewhat comfortably.  I still have issues with high places but for some reason the chair lift no longer bothers me.  Being on a ladder 10' of the ground still turns me into a terrified mess.

post #41 of 41
You've had a serious fall and your hinter mind is telling you to be careful (maybe a little to much) but it can be over come.

First get a good tune.
Second get hill time, ski and have fun, don't get pushed into skiing the runs that scare you. As the more fun you have the more likely you get into more did hot runs as confidence builds.
Thirdly side slip drills each and every run (10 ft per side). You are learning balance, edge feel and building confidence. I still do these for reFresher of my confidence with 47+ years of experience. Slowly take this into the scarier runs.
Don't rush it. Don't let it control you.

Remember the fear is trying to protect you, confidence lowers the fear level required to protect you. Otherwise go out and enjoy.
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