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Using ski boots AS shock absorber

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

  Being a skier that has never had a lesson and has only learned by watching others / On-line videos

I find myself trying all sorts of things..

 

I have learned I prefer to ski with both my shins pushing on the front of my skis as much as possible.

And in doing so find I can use my boots to absorb some small sized bumps while skiing fast.

 

Can anybody with more experience and skill confirm this technique ?

 

BTW - I have skied a total of 12 days so far this year and it actually feels more like 30..

 

Kyle

post #2 of 13

Depends .... if you find yourself doing reverse wheelies or with serious tibial bruising/pain, you might want to back off a bit - might be part of why 12 feels like 30 (or maybe you just fall a lot - perfectly normal, and actually a good sign at this stage). But it sounds like you have the right idea - forward cuff pressure to transfer pressure to the ski tips for better control/turn initiation.  The idea of it also playing a role in bump/vibration absorption is new to me, but seems valid.

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

 Ok ,

 

A couple of valid points you make..

My shins were sore and possible from to much pressure but also since I skied 6 days straight with 5 of them from 8:30 to 3:30 at whistler / blackcomb

 

Kyle

post #4 of 13

Keeping your shins to the tongue of the boot is a generally valid principle, and one you should continue to follow as you advance. The pressure on the boot tongue isn't actually what allows you to absorb the terrain better. At least not directly. With your shin against the tongue, you will naturally have your knees bent and in a better position to absorb those bumps. 

 

That being said, I'd strongly advise some more formal training. Without it, you're bound to hit a plateau, and probably sooner than you'd like. And to be very honest with you, if you're asking questions about staying forward, it means you are lacking a fundamental understanding of ski technique. Staying forward in stance is something instructors teach from day one, and proper stance is the foundation of all good skiing. I'm willing to bet that if we took a look at your skiing, we'd notice a lot of inefficient, dead-end movement patterns that are going to end up holding you back. 

 

I'm not trying to be a buzzkill, but giving you a very straightforward, blunt assessment based on what you're saying. 

post #5 of 13

I am not a modern expert advice giver but one thing I learned here (help from many) and also via vids and articles for making my switch to modern shaped skis vs my old straight skis was about the amount of shin and forward pressure in general. One of my biggiest flaws for the new vs what was good for the old was too much front pressure. A bit more balanced with a little less dominating shin pressure and unless one corrects me it seem to be one of the biggest factors. My old straights needed to be driven via much harder front pressure to turn but now its more about rolling and allowing the ski to carve with a little more balanced approach although still up front. Your still driving but just takes less effort. I hope this makes sense to those more dominant advice givers than I.

post #6 of 13

I'm not sure you're speaking the same ski language as what most skiers talk about, because I've never heard that tip described that way for that goal; so it seems like you're talking about a technique issue.


Unrelated to your technique, I'd d just like to throw in if you are truly looking for your boot to be a shock absorber as the thread title says; then indeed certain boots are designed for a little more vibration absorption.  Usually these features are more freeride boots rather than recreational or race boots.  The Bootboard will be slightly more rubberized rather then completely rock hard plastic. The soles of the boot may also be vibram soles which do do a very slight bit of absorption too.

The main absorption that comes through your gear though is going to be the ski and to a lesser extent certain binding setups. 

 

Whatever bumps and vibration makes it through, indeed you need to take care of through your skiing technique, which is beyond the scope of me to describe properly.  It's way more complex than just the single tip you described, but keeping shins always pressuring the boot is definitely a good tip to follow.

post #7 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speerhead View Post
 

 Ok ,

 

A couple of valid points you make..

My shins were sore and possible from to much pressure but also since I skied 6 days straight with 5 of them from 8:30 to 3:30 at whistler / blackcomb

 

Kyle

This can be solved with money for boots or boot adjustments to make that fit to your shin better, or even your sock choice.  Or it could be a technique issue where you're banging your shin (also because you have space for the bang to happen). The tip is still correct.


Edited by raytseng - 2/1/16 at 4:19pm
post #8 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post

Keeping your shins to the tongue of the boot is a generally valid principle, and one you should continue to follow as you advance. The pressure on the boot tongue isn't actually what allows you to absorb the terrain better. At least not directly. With your shin against the tongue, you will naturally have your knees bent and in a better position to absorb those bumps. 

That being said, I'd strongly advise some more formal training. Without it, you're bound to hit a plateau, and probably sooner than you'd like. And to be very honest with you, if you're asking questions about staying forward, it means you are lacking a fundamental understanding of ski technique. Staying forward in stance is something instructors teach from day one, and proper stance is the foundation of all good skiing. I'm willing to bet that if we took a look at your skiing, we'd notice a lot of inefficient, dead-end movement patterns that are going to end up holding you back. 

I'm not trying to be a buzzkill, but giving you a very straightforward, blunt assessment based on what you're saying. 

While everything you say I likely true.
Im not truly asking about staying forward.. I simply noticed while skiing fast and driving my skiis through some soft bumps my boots flex actual felt like a little bit of suspension and was curious if this was common.
If you have watched me ski you'd likely notice I have poor hand placement and upper body movement.. 1 thing at a time though..
I keep hearing about instruction, I may just try and find some smile.gif

Kyle
post #9 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

This can be solved with money for boots or boot adjustments to make that fit to your shin better, or even your sock choice.  Or it could be a technique issue where you're banging your shit (also because you have space for the bang to happen). The tip is still correct.

I was fitted with a rubber spacer in front of my ski tongue to absorb a little space in this area..
This was from fanatyke boot @ whistler

Kyle
post #10 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Speerhead View Post


While everything you say I likely true.
Im not truly asking about staying forward.. I simply noticed while skiing fast and driving my skiis through some soft bumps my boots flex actual felt like a little bit of suspension and was curious if this was common.
If you have watched me ski you'd likely notice I have poor hand placement and upper body movement.. 1 thing at a time though..
I keep hearing about instruction, I may just try and find some smile.gif

Kyle

 

I think for what you mentioned the answer is no.  The flex of the boot isn't typically used as "suspension" to make up for technique.  It does do some absorbption, but it shouldn't be your primary technique. Perhaps as a learner it'll help as a crutch to save you, but as you get more advanced you won't use that as a technique.  

 

If you have such a  soft boot that it can flex enough to absorb a bump, it also means when you try to press forward to change direction, that same flex is sloppy and you cannot finely control the skis.  

post #11 of 13
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post

I think for what you mentioned the answer is no.  The flex of the boot isn't typically used as "suspension" to make up for technique.  It does do some absorbption, but it shouldn't be your primary technique. Perhaps as a learner it'll help as a crutch to save you, but as you get more advanced you won't use that as a technique.  

If you have such a  soft boot that it can flex enough to absorb a bump, it also means when you try to press forward to change direction, that same flex is sloppy and you cannot finely control the skis.  


I wasn't really trying to use it as a technique only curious if it was felt or used by others.
I don't believe this to be because of soft boots, but more about the pressure I am applying at higher speeds..
I'm 6-3 and 230 ..
My boots are atomic hawk 110

Kyle
post #12 of 13

so yes, the point of the boot flex is to abosrb a little vibration.  Otherwise they'd just make boots out of some unflexible material.  But if it's so much that you notice it, or doing something special to engage that flex, or using the boot to do it, then something isn;t right.

post #13 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

so yes, the point of the boot flex is to abosrb a little vibration.  Otherwise they'd just make boots out of some unflexible material.  But if it's so much that you notice it, or doing something special to engage that flex, or using the boot to do it, then something isn;t right.

 

Depends on the boots themselves. Two vendors, FT and Dabello make a cabrio design which allows a fore/aft flex. These types of boots have become popular for park rats, jumper and bumpers. Even if you don't par-take in this type of skiing, going into glades becomes more fun because some obstacles comes up and you might have to take it on the shin. Or you have to place more shin pressure to make a move. Just sayin with out getting into techniques of things. 

 

 

 

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