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Bad stance due to poor posture - solutions?

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hi,

I have tried searching the internet for a long time for potential solutions. I have yet to find anyone with similar circumstances to me or any possible solutions. I'm hoping someone here may be able to help.

 

I'm 29 and when I was 16 I broke my left foot playing rugby. It healed badly and the NHS was unable to offer me surgery to fix it. As such, my mobility is limited and I have dealt with pain in this foot for 14 years. Due to this (and not wanting to live on painkillers) I subconsciously started to put most of my weight on my right foot. My posture is now fairly bad as when I stand upright I lean on to my right foot.

This is my second season snowboarding in Whistler and I noticed from my second day this has affected my riding.  I find myself continually not balanced over the board. I ride regular and am constantly leaning on my back leg. This almost works in my favour in powder but as soon as I get on a groomer I notice issues.

 

I have tried to fix this issue myself over the past years with mobility and strengthening exercises but to no avail. While my left foot is definitely stronger and more mobile than it was 4/5 years ago, I still find myself rarely putting weight on it and as soon as I start going down the hill I end up leaning back.


Just wondering if anyone has any tips for correcting balance because of this issue? Apologies for the long winded first post. Any help or suggestions are much appreciated.

 

post #2 of 6

Pilates and Rolfing.

post #3 of 6

There are several good physiotherapists in Whistler who can help, including Bianca Matheson at Back in Action and Allison McLean at Peak Performance. Before starting physiotherapy, please consult with a doctor at the Whistler clinic. I assume you have medical coverage for your stay. 

 

Rolfing is pseudoscience and is as effective as watching movies (though watching movies is cheaper and more enjoyable). 

post #4 of 6

While Rolfing has been labeled a psuedoscience, there have been success stories. I describe rolfing, massage, chiropractic and acupuncture as all going after the same thing via different methods. That's an oversimplification. There are good and bad practitioners in all disciplines. A physical therapist may be your best bet, but some people do end up trying several different approaches before finding one that works for them.

 

In the meantime, have you tried a duck stance and/or riding switch on the groomers?

post #5 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

While Rolfing has been labeled a psuedoscience, there have been success stories. I describe rolfing, massage, chiropractic and acupuncture as all going after the same thing via different methods. 

 

Rusty, this one is hugely important. 

 

There certainly are people who feel they've benefited from rolfing, much like there are people who feel they benefit from reflexology, reiki, energy crystals, and homeopathy. However, studies published in peer-reviewed journals reveal no efficacy of rolfing beyond placebo. 

 

Similar criticism exists around acupuncture - it produces a small analgesic effect, but will not cure cancer, make you lose weight or wash your dishes for you. The same criticism applies to chiropractic; it's effective in treating very specific issues, though not necessarily better than physiotherapy, and certainly isn't capable of curing your cold or treating problems rooted in viral or bacterial infection (which chiropractic claims to do). Penn and Teller did a great episode of Bullshit! exposing fraudulent alternative non-treatments, which is worth watching for anyone who likes to take a "just do what works for you" approach to life.

 

The bottom line is flim-flam treatments are not just ineffective; they actually do harm by delaying a patient's access to or interfering with real treatment. 

post #6 of 6

I agree this is hugely important. I disagree that this all is 100% ineffective and harmful. I've personally had success with chiropractic treatment after just getting muscle relaxers from the regular doctor. My mom has a spinal condition that is medically untreatable. She's had success with acupuncture as a replacement for Percoset. I love Penn and Teller. I saw that show. There are quacks in every discipline. I agree that physical therapy is the first place I'd turn to if I was in the OP's shoes. With all due respect to you, Penn and Teller, I disagree about not looking at alternative approaches if PT was not effective. "Your mileage may vary" applies.

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