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Telemark Starter Suggestions

post #1 of 5
Thread Starter 

I recently moved and my wife and now a one year old daughter.  Having been through this before (children), I know my next few years will be spent on the local 200' vert hill greenest runs.   I went to a telemark festival a few years ago, had a blast and loved the community - but couldn't justify buying gear.   Now I have an opportunity to justify it.  =)

 

So, I'm thinking about getting something in the 55-70 range; similar to Madhus Glittertind Skis (55 width), Voile three pin cable, and 75mm boots (Alpina Aleska or smaller).   I'm selling the idea (to wife) of my 4th set of skis as giving me more flexibility to help my daughter while reducing the potential for back injuries.    Having already pinching a back nerve while trying my son learn to ski, helps to sell the severity of the risks involved.  =)

The other benefit would be learning something I've wanted to learn.

 

I'll use them on piste for Michigan resort hills chasing a toddler on weekends and trailblazing bike trails and local parks during the week.

 

Does this setup seem reasonable for learning to drop a knee in Michigan?   Any suggestions are welcomed.    

 

Thank you.

post #2 of 5

I play around in my woods at home using a well beaten pair of Garmont ener-Gs, Cobra bindings and picked up a pair of LLBean Boreals for $50. 

 

I sympathize with wanting to go with a leather boot but as part of your objective is to help with the toddler the additional support and control of a soft plastic boot may better suit your needs. there are lots of used Garmont synerG and enerG boots out there, check out your local consignment shop and look for 2 or 3 buckle boots. As far as skis just about anything goes, but again as the primary focus is ostensibly on skiing with your kid I'd look for a full metal edge, single camber, relatively short ski. Be aware that a 3 pin binding can lead to serious booting out problems on a skinny ski when you add speed, but anything wider then say 65 is pretty safe in that regard. Madshus, Alpina and Fischer all make well regarded play around (ie fish scale) skis, or just use an old pair of your alpine skis. Used boots with a light 3 pin/cable binding on an existing ski might get you on the way for under $200. Check out Outdoor Gear Exchange (gearx.com) for ideas, and have fun!

     Dave       

post #3 of 5
Quote:
Originally Posted by Petri View Post
 

I recently moved and my wife and now a one year old daughter.  Having been through this before (children), I know my next few years will be spent on the local 200' vert hill greenest runs.   I went to a telemark festival a few years ago, had a blast and loved the community - but couldn't justify buying gear.   Now I have an opportunity to justify it.  =)

 

So, I'm thinking about getting something in the 55-70 range; similar to Madhus Glittertind Skis (55 width), Voile three pin cable, and 75mm boots (Alpina Aleska or smaller).   I'm selling the idea (to wife) of my 4th set of skis as giving me more flexibility to help my daughter while reducing the potential for back injuries.    Having already pinching a back nerve while trying my son learn to ski, helps to sell the severity of the risks involved.  =)

The other benefit would be learning something I've wanted to learn.

 

I'll use them on piste for Michigan resort hills chasing a toddler on weekends and trailblazing bike trails and local parks during the week.

 

Does this setup seem reasonable for learning to drop a knee in Michigan?   Any suggestions are welcomed.

 

Thank you.

I started out hacking around on Asolo leather boots and Voile pinners. Leather is by far more comfortable. The drawback? Control on firm snow. Leathers have little torsional rigidity, making it hard to get up on and keep the ski on edge on firm snow. Considering you will be teaching on groomers, go with a plastic boot. It's night and day. Cable bindings are more forgiving than pinners due to the ease of adjustment.

post #4 of 5

Go eBay:

 

Scarpa T2's

Pair of Hammerhead bindings

Any skis - sounds like you need something for hard pack there, just get any used downhill ski for hardpack.

 

Boots and bindings are the most important - maybe get a pair of adjustable poles as you will probably want a little shorter poles than usual alpine skiing poles.  

 

Swivel the hips, keep the shoulders pointed downhill, have fun.  Taught my boys to ski while on tele skis - much easier.

post #5 of 5
Thread Starter 

Thank you for the advice !   

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