or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › EpicSki Community › Trip Reports  › Trip Report: Brundage, 1/19/16-1/22/16
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Trip Report: Brundage, 1/19/16-1/22/16

post #1 of 4
Thread Starter 

Brundage is in central Idaho, about 2 1/2 hours drive from Boise.  I drove from the Seattle area, which took about 8 hours.  Brundage does not have lodging at the mountain; McCall is about 20 minutes away on Payette Lake.  McCall at an elevation of 5000 feet, has a population of about 3000.  Originally a logging town, these days it’s pretty much a year-round tourist destination.  Let me clarify that: tourist-outdoors-recreational, rather than tourist-luxury-pampered.  People come here to do stuff: hiking, fishing, hunting, and in the winter snowshoe-ing, snowmobiling, and of course skiing and boarding.  For it size, McCall over-achieves in food quality IMHO.  They have a large number of restaurants including a fabulous bakery, Stacey Cakes, plus a great sushi restaurant, right across the street from a micro-brewery that also has outstanding food.  It’s a pretty town, right on the lake, and Payette Lake State Park on a peninsula dicing the lake. There are woods in every direction, with lots of wildlife.  Drive down any side street and you will see 3-4 deer at a time, and they will often show up right outside your condo back deck.  We also saw a fox a couple of times right outside the deck.  










On a clear day, you can see mountains all around you.  On a foggy day, you can fog all around you.  Which brings me to Brundage.  My first day there, it was a foggy on the the top third of the ski area.  The second day, foggy from top to bottom.  The last two days, overcast but clear visibility, and from the top of the Lakeview side you can see into town (and vice versa).


With fog.


Without fog.



Brundage is not a huge resort, with about 1500 acres and 1800’ vertical.  They are planning an expansion, though, that will open up a lot of more challenging terrain.  That said, it feels huge, because there aren’t many people on the slopes.  My first day, I was blown away by the fact that when I started a run I was often the only person there, practically top-to-bottom.   Brundage has quite a few locala, but then it’s population is only 3000.  On weekends it draws traffic from Boise, though Boise also has Bogus Basin right there, and Tamarack as well is only 30 minutes from McCall (didn’t get there this trip).  So, big enough terrain with few enough people, to make it pretty empty most of the time.


Notice the crowds.



Brundage is predominantly an intermediate resort, with wide open runs, most of them groomed. However on a powder day, they groom minimally.  Also there are glades and glades and glades and glades.  A day or two after a 6” powder day, there were still nice patches of powder in the trees, and you can pretty much ski the trees in between every run.  To the north side of the resort is Hidden Valley (north of a run called North); it’s all trees and glades, no cut runs.  The future terrain expansion, currently 20-30 minute hike-to terrain is beyond this area.  Currently the one inbounds double black pitch, Northwest Passage, is fairly short, but steep.  


Glades, gotta love glades.



So you don’t come here for the gnar, you come for the snow.  Brundage claims to have the best snow in Idaho, and with the lack of crowds you chance of getting powder is better here than anyplace else IMHO.  On the lifts I met locals, but also a few travelers on ski vacations from Florida or Jersey (the guy who’s working on his 5-year retirement plan to move to Boise, with a condo in McCall).  I met family from Montana on vacation, the mother had grown up skiing Winter Park/MJ and loved Brundage.   Brundage earned Top 10 rankings in Ski magazine this past year (#9 for families, #10 for value and #10 for snow).  I agree with all of those rankings (great terrain pod for beginners on Easy Street and Bear chairs; tickets $62, and great snow) but I’m amazed Brundage even made it on anyone’s radar, as it isn’t a “resort” with base lodging or tons of amenities at the mountain, or otherwise much industry buzz as a destination.  Most of the resorts that are ranked are much larger and well-known.  So somehow they got enough destination visitors, who like myself, had an awesome time.  The snow is definitely drier than the Cascade concrete I’m accustomed to, and lasts a long time without setting up.   


The main lift, Bluebird, is an express quad with about 1500’ vertical.  From there, you can reach most of the mountain.  About 4 runs, plus the trees in between, are immediately accessible, to skiers’ right a traverse takes you to the Northwest Passage and Hidden Valley areas.


Lower part of North trail.



Skiers’ left takes you to more long cruisers, plus the trees in between, past the Centennial lift (fixed grip triple that runs on weekends), past Meadow Bowl (absolutely spend some time here), to the Lakeview Ridge.  Lakeview Ridge starts to parallel the Lakeview chair lift, a fixed grip triple with about 900‘ vertical, with 3 groomed runs, one run that’s never groomed, and lots of glades. You can spend a lot of time exploring the Lakeview area, and the view from the top of McCall and the surrounding area is spectacular, unless it’s foggy and you can’t see s#%t.  But then, they have all these trees.


Top of Meadow Bowl.  I really liked Meadow Bowl with left over cut up snow, and the last few patches of untracked. It's rated Black Diamond, so not as much traffic, I guess, than most of the other pitches, also a longer traverse than the main runs from Buebird.




Lakeview chair, with McCall way back in the center background. 



Continuing on Lakeview Ridge it turns back to the front side and merges with a long green run Temptation, dropping you into the bottom of the Centennial and Bear chairs.  Take the Bear chair and it’s a short run on Griz to return to the base.


On my last day we had checked out of the condo and wanted to hit the road, so I skied a half day; in 3 hours I easily racked up 15,000 vertical feet, mostly on the Bluebird express but with a couple of runs at Lakeview and returns on Bear, with a few more times on runs like 45th Parallel that require using the Bear chair to return to base. 


The Brundage lodge:  ground floor has tickets, 1st floor day lockers and ski shop, 2nd floor Smokey's Bar and Grill as well as season lockers and restrooms, 3rd floor cafeteria/brown bag.



So who is Brundage for?  As mentioned, the terrain is predominantly intermediate.  If you like smaller towns, with decent food, friendly people, beautiful setting on a lake surrounded by forests, little to no traffic (no stoplights), easy access to the slopes, great snow, and are willing to live without a ton of steep terrain, Brundage makes for a great trip.

post #2 of 4

Nice trip report.  I'm primarily an east coast skier but Brundage looks very picturesque.  Those trees look so majestic and fun to ski through and around  That picture from the lower part of the north trail does a great job of showing the size of the trees. They just look amazing.  Looks like a great time!!

post #3 of 4
Brundage sucks, don't go there. There is no good powder skiing there. Stick to the intermediate groomed runs.cool.gif
post #4 of 4
Been Brundgeeing for a few years. Nice folks around those parts. Discount tixs,cool lodge w/ vintage ski pics.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Trip Reports
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › EpicSki Community › Trip Reports  › Trip Report: Brundage, 1/19/16-1/22/16