or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

To edgie wedgie or not?

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 

I am a mediocre skier at best, trying to teach my little one (she is shy and won't work with an instructor).  She is just a few months shy of 3 years old.  We bought Slope Ropes which have been a total lifesaver, but now me and my husband are debating whether to add Edgie Wedgies.  I say no - because the Slope Ropes help me turn her and control her and she is using proper form on her own which I love.  He says yes...mostly I think because he bought her some for Christmas and doesn't want to admit they were unnecessary! ;) 

Would love thoughts.  

I guess they can't hurt - but I just wonder if we need them!?

post #2 of 11

3 years old is pretty little.  My littler one started out with the edgie wedgie type devices for a few days.  I'd say not to combine training devices, but losing the ropes and tying the tips while she's learning to get down the really easy trails.. "all by herself" is certainly an option for a kid that little. I wouldn't recommend that device under any circumstances for an 8 year old though hahahaha..

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 


Thanks for the advice.  No way in h*** I'm losing the Slope Ropes, but maybe when my husband takes her out he will?  To me they are a life saver and she loves them.  But maybe if we swap out devices when we swap out parents she'll benefit from trying both! 

post #4 of 11

While I won't be as stubborn as I am with opinions on other subjects, I say forget about the edgie wedgies. I think they get in the way more than they help.  It is rare that we see these devices and kids seem to do all right without them. A rope for safety?  Sure. 

post #5 of 11
This is an interesting question! We cover this a lot with our new hires in childrens ski school. It starts with understanding ski appliances that treat technical deficiencies need to be seen as strong medicine that treats a symptom but do not address the root cause. Consider the idea that motor control does not develop at the same rate in kids. So she may be better equipped to ski next season when she has a little more control of her body. That doesn't mean she cannot enjoy the snow this season. What it means is clue into her wants and needs. I would suggest flatter terrain and mobility activities like tag, etc. The carrot being mastery there will allow you to eventually open up more of the mountain to her as she gains skill ownership. This means you must avoid trying to add your desire to ski more of the mountain for an hour or so. In no time she will develop the ability to go there with you but when she does she will do so with a lot more confidence. Plus it gives you a chance to just play together and if you switch off time with her it frees up one of you to make a few runs before switching off. In the end no one progression exists and let her be your guide. Also remember to quit before she craters (less than two hours is best) and she will always want to do more, quit after she craters and she is likely to learn to hate skiing pretty quickly.
Above all else have fun, some of your best ski memories will likely happen at this stage.

JASP
Keystone Ski and Ride School
post #6 of 11

I'm a kids instructor at Deer Valley.  I usually work with 5-6 year olds.

 

We use them.  I've found that it usually helps them understand the required motion and in less than 20-30 minutes I'm able to remove the edgie wedgie and the kids can then perform a wedge and slow and stop themselves and begin to make turns.  

 

IMO, the slope ropes don't teach the kid anything.  Usually it's the parents trying to get the kid skiing on terrain that they aren't ready to ski yet.

post #7 of 11

I like hula hoops as they allow you to both push and pull.  Here I assume the adult/parent skis backward, on very gentle terrain.

 

You can also ski behind the child - but then they are sorta "trapped" inside the hoop.  Depending on age this may be fine (and then you can loosen your grip on the hoop, or let it go as appropriate).

 

What a parent does may not be the same as what Ski School allows.

post #8 of 11
True, parents are able to incorporate a ton more appliances than we would docbrad. Although like I suggested earlier, why they are doing that needs to be discussed. I have watched more that a few parents over terrain junior. Eventually that turns around when junior gets better than dad / mom.
post #9 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHudson View Post
 

I am a mediocre skier at best, trying to teach my little one (she is shy and won't work with an instructor).  She is just a few months shy of 3 years old.  We bought Slope Ropes which have been a total lifesaver, but now me and my husband are debating whether to add Edgie Wedgies.  I say no - because the Slope Ropes help me turn her and control her and she is using proper form on her own which I love.  He says yes...mostly I think because he bought her some for Christmas and doesn't want to admit they were unnecessary! ;) 

Would love thoughts.  

I guess they can't hurt - but I just wonder if we need them!?

 

The wedgies work. In a ski instructor setting especially with only one or two students I don't use them because I think kids learn quicker without with my help. That's my job right! However, sometimes its more important to get the kids "skiing" for motivational reasons. That's when the wedgies come in handy even for an instructor. And there are also near "hopeless" cases where wedgies are needed so don't be afraid to use them. In combination with a "slacked" slope rope they are usable for intermediate and up parents wanting to ski with their kids themselves. I'm saying "slacked" because you should not have to pull the brakes or make them turn. The slope rope is only for safety reasons.

 

IMO you should not put your kids on alpine skis before the age of 3. I've had 2 students that young and even if they learned to ski with me during multiple lessons in one case stretching the whole winter I would not recommend it. Put them on ice scates and Nordic skis first.

post #10 of 11
The Canadian Ski Instructor Alliance has some very good videos (which I learned about a lot after teaching mine to ski). However 3 is not to young, with three things in mind safe, fun and time. The last is important as some take longer than others as they learn at different rates. Once they are hooked on the fun part, the learning becomes easier as they see it as a tool to have access to better fun (i.e. No "Doggie leashes").
post #11 of 11

I don't have much of an opinion on some of these devices however yesterday on the slopes I saw something I definitely didn't like.  I saw a young child skiing down the slope with  some sort of restraint reins    (slope rope?)  doesn't matter what the device was.   The kid was skiing down unrestrained going at a pretty good clip for a little one  and they were dragging the reins behind them.   All I could picture was to see these reins get caught on something and bring this kid to a screeching halt.   YM

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching