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Fischer Motive 95ti: long term update

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

 

Fischer Motive 95ti: updated review

 

The Ski: Fischer Motive 95ti, 180cm, mounted with an Attack 13 demo binding, on the line. Early rise, with a bit of a tapered tip, 95mm underfoot, 19m radius

 

The skier: 5 foot 9, 155lbs, a little rusty in the video (3rd day on the hill for the season)

 

The conditions: heavier snow and cruddy bumps down below, very light 2-3 inches on top.

 

I have been skiing this model on and off over the past couple of seasons: I don't have a ton of time on it, but at every demo event, it never fails to impress. The ski is somewhat unique: 2 sheets of metal, wood and carbon layup, but the flex is fairly soft. It has the very Stockli-like combination of being a GS ski at heart yet softened considerably for all-mountain use, mixed-condition skiing and terrain. Underneath, it is still a Fischer, and that means race-bred: it an outstanding carver for this mid 90's to 100mm category. What sets the Motive 95ti apart from it's peers, at least on my feet, is the ski's amazing forgiveness and versatility.

 

When skiing it in these conditions, the first thing I noticed was the very substantial float. My other test skis on the day, the Blizzard Bonafide and the Head Monster 98, did not have the same amount of float. The Motive 95ti has a nice, long, low early rise tip that felt like it belonged on a ski that was 105 underfoot, not 95. The tip flex was perfect for getting out of the snow and not hanging up. So far, so good! It was a tip that I could trust: if I was active with my feet, moving them fore and aft, the tip wouldn't bury in the snow. It really helped to loosen up my releases and flow with the terrain well.

 

Even though the tip on the Motive was surfy, it wasn't soft. Tip flap was at a bare minimum. When I have had this on firmer groomers in the past, it doesn't disappoint; I would rate it's carving performance up there near the top, only behind the extremely substantial skis such as the Bonafide and the MX98 from Kastle. In the chop, it tracks extremely well, as you can see in the video.

 

In bumps, I wouldn't expect the Motive to do that well if I had seen the ski “on paper”; however, it is a very, very good bump ski. Again, the tip is not too stout, and driving the tip into the backside of a bump is anything but a scary experience. Very compliant; and upon release of the turn, the tail doesn't take you for a ride. In comparison to the 3 skis I tried that day, the Motive gets the nod in bumps too.

 

Forgiveness: I couldn't ask for more. This ski does have metal: it isn't a soft twin rocker back seat ski, so it demands a bit of precision. That precision is rewarded with an energetic and powerful release, and instant feedback. The Motive is anything but punishing: make a mistake and you will know about it, but you won't be flung out of control. I can recover from mistakes on this ski, better than almost anything else in this performance realm. I would say it is even as forgiving as it's supposedly more off-piste oriented brother, the Ranger. A key part of this forgiveness is the damping that the metal in this ski provides. It really quiets and controls the ski in chop and crud.

 

Flex profile: just about perfect. Laterally stiff, moderate stiffness tip and tail, substantial energy without a feeling of being wound tight. It had a great flex pattern for a skier such as myself, but other bigger skiers can enjoy it too. I have put several people on the 186cm that weighed over 200lbs, and all found it to be an outstanding tool in any condition.

 

In summary; this is a ski that feels like the complete package, given it's width and intended purpose. I would comfortably take this on any Western ski area road trip, knowing I will have a capable tool no matter the conditions present. It isn't just a good ski that does a lot of things well: it has exceptional “flow”, meaning that transitions from turn to turn are measured and that turns flow well together. It isn't an “on-off” ski like some, that feel like they are nervous when not on edge or skied a certain way. This ski flows like water down a pitch; it conforms to the terrain in a way that very few skis do. I can trust the Motive to put me in a position where I can execute the turn cleanly and in balance, setting me up for the next turn. That is an extremely rare attribute in a ski. Most skis are the sum of their parts: the Motive is more, as every bit of the ski works in harmony with the rest. Tough to explain, but when I felt it working underfoot, sucking up terrain and keeping me in balance, the “complete package” aspect of the Motive became obvious. There is also something about this ski: it really rewards good skiing without trying to make the skier into something they aren't. These days, many skis have artificial personalities to make the skier feel like they are elevating their game, only to let them down when conditions get tough. Overly-aggressive edge characteristics make a less skilled skier think they all of the sudden carving, and then in junk snow, they have a handful of a ski. Huge soft forgiving tails allow a skier to back-seat all the way down a mountain, until they hit steep trees or bumps and get owned. The Motive isn't that ski: it won't gloss over your mistakes, and it won't give you a participation trophy. However, it rewards good skiing, and is the best tool imaginable in a wider ski for becoming a better skier, in a very approachable package. I wish more skis were made this way.

 

I would give it my highest overall rating.

 

I would rate it's performance in the following way (1-10, with 10 being a ski that singularly excels in that condition)

Groomers, energy and grip: 7

Bump performance; 7

crud skimming: 8.5

Crud-busting: 7.5

new snow float: 8

forgiveness: 8.5

overall package: 9

post #2 of 16

I liked those so much I picked up a pair for myself this year. I've been really impressed with their versatility, they've ripped in crud and on groomers, and I had them out on a powder day last year and they impressed on that as well. One of my top choices for a western quiver of 1 ski.

post #3 of 16

Thanks for a great comprehensive review. Have you skied the Atomic Vantage 100 CTi ? I was wondering how it would compare to the Motive 95 ? I can't get a demo of the Motive 95 in Whistler but have skied the Vantage 100 and felt to me very much how you have described the Motive 95.

post #4 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by dbqu View Post
 

Thanks for a great comprehensive review. Have you skied the Atomic Vantage 100 CTi ? I was wondering how it would compare to the Motive 95 ? I can't get a demo of the Motive 95 in Whistler but have skied the Vantage 100 and felt to me very much how you have described the Motive 95.


I haven't skied the Atomic, sorry!  Hopefully I can attend a 2nd demo event this year and get some time on them!

post #5 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
 

 

 

Flex profile: just about perfect. Laterally stiff, moderate stiffness tip and tail, substantial energy without a feeling of being wound tight. It had a great flex pattern for a skier such as myself, but other bigger skiers can enjoy it too. I have put several people on the 186cm that weighed over 200lbs, and all found it to be an outstanding tool in any condition.

 

 

I would give it my highest overall rating.

 

I would rate it's performance in the following way (1-10, with 10 being a ski that singularly excels in that condition)

Groomers, energy and grip: 7

Bump performance; 7

crud skimming: 8.5

Crud-busting: 7.5

new snow float: 8

forgiveness: 8.5

overall package: 9

At 215, I ski the 180 and I agree with all you said...Really nice all around and just love it in bumps! I would rate crud busting a tiny bit lower but I'm sure it's because I'm on the 180... Would love to try the 186!

post #6 of 16


Great review (and video).  Thanks for taking the time.  How would you compare this ski to the Nordica Enforcer or Bonafide? 

post #7 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by AndyBzn View Post
 


Great review (and video).  Thanks for taking the time.  How would you compare this ski to the Nordica Enforcer or Bonafide? 

 

I haven't skied the Enforcer in similar conditions yet, it was only in crap snow.  

 

The Bonafide: I skied both it and the Brahma the other day.  The Bone feels even sharper as a groomer ride.   Different flex pattern totally: much stiffer at the tip, about the same underfoot, beefier at the tail.  It has the same float at the tip; it tends to blast through the terrain more, doesn't track as well. The softer flex of the Motive "gets out of the way" and adheres to terrain undulations better; like the difference between a performance car with stock suspension vs. a car equipped with Bilstein PSS9's. It rougher snow, it's the more stable ski.  The Bone has more bite at the tip, really wants to pull me into the turn, for better or worse. For those who like immediacy, or those who equate that early engagement to better skiing; it is a more direct ski. It has more grip, more power, more snap, more energy.  

 

It is tough, as I am not really the Bonafide's target customer.  I don't weigh enough.  Brad has skied both quite a bit, he is 190lbs, and has the same impressions as I: the Motive feels like the race bred 50/50 ride and is truly at home in any condition, whereas the Bone is a stronger flex, more of a wide carver in feel, great combo if you want a wide groomer ski that also has lots of float off-piste.  A guy who is 210+ probably has a completely different impression however: the Motive might be too soft of a ski, and that could be where the Bone comes into it's own. The Motive is one of the softest all-mountain skis on the market with 2 sheets of metal: the Bonafide is one of the stiffest.  I can ski the Bone, but it makes me tentative in tight spots.  

 

Onto the Brahma: this ski is basically the old Bonafide, narrowed a bit.  It's a good ski; again, one of the stiffest skis on the market.  It comes across very much like the Bonafide: a wide carver, very powerful, great grip, tough to flex.  The flex does feel a bit friendlier than the old Bonafide, probably because it is narrower and has less material.  I noticed it is very "on/off", much unlike the Motive, which has a fairly good ability to drift, for a ski with 2 sheets of metal. The Brahma wants to be carving and on edge: very stiff laterally.  I had to ski more precisely on it vs. the Motive: it really needed an aggressive foot-pull back move to bend the tip.  Otherwise, I couldn't ski it directly like I can the Motive. With that said, it was a fun, powerful ski in off-piste conditions, great on groomers. I liked it in bumps, provided I was committed (again, foot pull-back move was key, otherwise, I went right into the back seat and could not recover).  I had a ton of fun on the 173cm actually; the 180 was too long for the most part, I just had trouble flexing the tip.  Again, a bigger guy is going to love the Brahma; for me, I need a ski that isn't one of the stiffest on the market.  I ski pretty fast and with solid skills, but 155lbs can only flex so much ski.  It was super fun on groomers, like a wide GS ride; and solid in bumps; it forced me to ski cleanly, and the reward was excellent turns.  But, I think this is primarily a ski you look at it if you are over 180lbs, or are wanting to ski it a size down, which is much more manageable.  It's definitely a ski I would take up on a frontside day, especially in 173cm, and it tracked decently well in junky snow. 

post #8 of 16


Thanks, Dawgcatching.  What a phenomenally helpful response.  You managed to capture both my likes and concerns regarding the Bones.  Haven't seen these Fischers on the mountain, but I'll look a bit harder.  Your description makes them sound similar to the Enforcer (which I have mixed emotions about).  Would love to hear an opinion from someone who's skied both in comparable conditions.  Who knows, maybe I'll be that person come Thursday. ;-)

post #9 of 16
I'll chime in since I own both the old Bonafide (purchased from Scott/Dawgcatching) as well as the Motive 95. Once the season gets going and the rocks are covered, 90% of my skiing is done on the Bonafide (187), Motive 95 (186) or Kastle MX88 (188). A key distinction between Scott and me is that I am 6" 3" and weigh 210 or 215.

The Bonafide and Motive 95 are similar skis in many respects (and nobody really needs to own both) but I would give the Bonafide the edge in firmer groomers, heavy crud, and generally more difficult off trail conditions (the latter probably due to the tail rocker). I do not find them too difficult to flex except the tip is a little too much to be a good bump ski but 70 pounds of additional weight undoubtedly contribute to my conclusion since I am not as skilled a skier as the Scott I see in his videos. I would give the Motive 95 the edge on softer groomers, bumps and is generally a little less demanding to ski while still having plenty of top end power. I do not see it as "too soft" at my weight. If forced to chose 1 or as a travel ski, I would generally take the Bonafide but long-term familiarity may be a factor.

I skied the Motive 95, the new Enforcer, the old Bonafide (mine) and the new Bonafide back-to-back last spring at Snowbasin's demo day. The new Bonafide felt a lot like the old Bonafide but certainly the carbon tip is noticeable. I would need to ski it more before I called it a big improvement. The Motive 95 impressed in the areas outlined above enough that I sought out and found a good end-off-season deal and am happy with my purchase. It did not strike me as a clone of the new Enforcer and the design is certainly different in terms of tip taper and tail rise.
post #10 of 16


Thanks, SB77.  Gives me a good idea what to watch for if I can find ski them this week.  I appreciate your insights.

post #11 of 16

When thinking of the Motive 95 vs the Bonafide, one thing comes to mind: I would say that the Motive 95 has a  more "on-piste carver feel" than the Bonafide that has a more "freeride ski that can carve feel" ( In fact, the 95 feel a lot like the Motive 86 when you ski it... )... Both skis are fun to carve but the 95 is less of a tank and more lively than the Bonafide... If I wanted to really really open it up, I would choose the Bonafide that feel more stable since it has more weight; but since I do a lot of bumps and trees, I prefer the 95 that is way more fun in bumps due to softer tip and lighter feel (Me: 215 pounds and skied the 180 Bonafide and Motive 95...)

post #12 of 16

Anyone know the factory angles on the Motive's?  After several days of firm conditions I just want to hit the edges with the stones. Not trying to change anything as I thought the factory tune was really good on my pair.

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by mogsie View Post
 

When thinking of the Motive 95 vs the Bonafide, one thing comes to mind: I would say that the Motive 95 has a  more "on-piste carver feel" than the Bonafide that has a more "freeride ski that can carve feel" ( In fact, the 95 feel a lot like the Motive 86 when you ski it... )... Both skis are fun to carve but the 95 is less of a tank and more lively than the Bonafide... If I wanted to really really open it up, I would choose the Bonafide that feel more stable since it has more weight; but since I do a lot of bumps and trees, I prefer the 95 that is way more fun in bumps due to softer tip and lighter feel (Me: 215 pounds and skied the 180 Bonafide and Motive 95...)

 

That's interesting: I skied both the Motive and the Bonafide last spring in the Bachelor Cirque, basically wind-blown snow over frozen basketballs; extremely rough conditions at speed. The Motive was superior in those huge 40m radius turns at speed.  The Bone got bounced at the tip quite a bit more than I expected.  The best ski in there was the MX88; the best ski would have been a GS ski however! 

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by dawgcatching View Post
 

 

That's interesting: I skied both the Motive and the Bonafide last spring in the Bachelor Cirque, basically wind-blown snow over frozen basketballs; extremely rough conditions at speed. The Motive was superior in those huge 40m radius turns at speed.  The Bone got bounced at the tip quite a bit more than I expected.  The best ski in there was the MX88; the best ski would have been a GS ski however! 

 I think it is another proof that the 180 Bonafide is enough for my weight but , due to it's softer flex, the 95 is not enough in 180 and I should have gotten the 186! Since I want to use it mostly when I go in trees and bumps, I wonder if I'm better with the 180 ( and less performance on-piste; but still nice) or the 186 would also be nice in bumps and trees here...

post #15 of 16

@dawgcatching  Can you compare the Motive 95 to the Elan Spire? I have a couple friends who are planning on buying new skis and had them try out my Spires (181 length, I think). If they try/buy the Motive 95, what would they expect to be different from the Spire?

post #16 of 16

I am about 20 days into my Motive 95s (Aaatack 13 demos). I ski them about half a cm forward. For some reason they line up 1/2 cm forward or back, not on the line. They were mounted by a very experienced tech, so I am going to guess that it might be the exact BSL of my boot and how it matches the size range of the binding. I am 6'2" and ~200 lbs. I ski the 180cm and have never once felt that they were too short. I like to turn up the speed in pristine conditions, but I've never even gotten a dirty look from resort personnel, so I am sure I am not going THAT fast.


I simply agree with every word that Dawg says. He really is the gold standard for reviews, along with Blister Gear. In the bumps, I do find the stiffness of the tails a bit challenging. But I am CERTAIN that it is because I am not very experienced at skiing firm bumps/true moguls. I have a pair of Moment Underworld that I like better in bumps. Again, firm ones. However, soft bumps the Motive just kind of mounts gently due to the tip character Dawg described, and then the stiffer middle and tail just kind of blast whatever is remaining. Rinse, lather, repeat. 


I'm an improving advanced but by no means expert skier. I couldn't have picked a better ski for taking my skiing to the next level. 

 

It really excels at "skiing the slow line fast". I had a blast sunday following my son down the long, very gently inclined "village run" at Northstar. He was straightlining (he only weighs 40 lbs!) and I was hot on his heels doing my best to leave nothing but edge grooves the whole way down (and mostly succeeding!). Sun was low behind me so he could see every move in my shadow and thought it was the funnest thing. So did I!

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