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Very hard to get foot into boots

post #1 of 25
Thread Starter 

The boots are just stiff, they are kept warm before use.  We were talking with a guy on the lift and he said that he used silicone spray and it really made it easy to get his boots on and off.  Is this a good idea or a bad idea?  Will silicone shorten the life of the boots in some way?  What say the experts?

 

Thanks, Ted

post #2 of 25

No problem with the silicone unless it makes parts slide around when you don't want them to slide and it effects your skiing.  Silicone lube on the overlapping plastic parts is OK.  Stops squeaks, too.

post #3 of 25

Someone here recommended food grade silicon. Supposed to be safe for that. I've been using it for 3 years along with a Hotgear Heated Boot Bag with great results.

post #4 of 25
Thread Starter 

Food-grade silicon, interesting.  We will explore.  

post #5 of 25

Heated boot bag, does the trick.  Plug it in for a couple of hours with the boots inside and they slide right on.  I couldn't get my last pair of boots on at all if I didn't heat them up.  Heated up they went on easy.

 

Getting them off was also hard, particularly on a cold day.  I carried a blow dryer, put it aiming down the front inside of the tongue for a minute or less and they came off easy.  Softens the plastic.

 

 

I love my new boots because I don't need to do this anymore.

post #6 of 25
Astroglide on the footbeds.
post #7 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by TeddyO View Post

The boots are just stiff, they are kept warm before use.  We were talking with a guy on the lift and he said that he used silicone spray and it really made it easy to get his boots on and off.  Is this a good idea or a bad idea?  Will silicone shorten the life of the boots in some way?  What say the experts?

Thanks, Ted

A hot bag works really well. I've had boots that were nearly impossible to get on without being in the hot bag overnight. Even with lace up liners that came out each time. The hot bag is a good solution especially with liners that stay in the boots. But even with laceups, getting them off was something else.......it was always a struggle and on colder days they just wouldn't come off without using a heat gun. Nordica dobermann plug boots. Going to the Fischer Vacuum put an end to that nonsense. Silicone spray won't do anything unless you have lace-up liners. With lace-ups it's a good idea and they go on/off much easier. Mine are zipfits, smooth and leather like. But I don't spray the liner, just spray a little inside the boot on the spine and wipe it, also wipe some up under the instep. And no...it doesn't need to be food grade, the stuff you get at Home Depot is fine. And no.....nothing slides around after the is boot buckled.
post #8 of 25

Pulling the tongue laterally while pulling the medial shell further medially is a good trick. This technique is probably easier to show that to describe.

post #9 of 25

My boots are impossible to get into. I never do it in the parking lot. Not gonna happen. 

 

Head RAptor WC 150RD with custom foam lace up liner. 

 

So 2 things. I bring a little folding portable hair dryer to the lodge in my pack. 

 

And I am the one who mentioned Food Grade Silicone Spray. This is used to preserve and lubricate Dry Suit Seals which are rubber. You can easily find it online /at a dive shop. One treatment lasts at a least 4-6 times of skiing.    I spray the back of the liner and the inside of the spine of the shell. Really helps. Doesn't take much just a small burst!

very 

http://www.amazon.com/Conair-1600-Folding-Handle-Dryer/dp/B000094ZDX/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1453343893&sr=8-6&keywords=foldable+travel+hair+dryer

post #10 of 25

If they're lace up, put on your liners on first. You can put a lot more pressure on the shell to spread it when the top of your instep is already in the liner, and the shells are naturally slippery. 

post #11 of 25


And while you're on Amazon checking out hair dryers;

http://www.amazon.com/CRC-Grade-Silicone-Lubricant-Weight/dp/B00192D0TQ/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1453350467&sr=8-3&keywords=silicone+spray

Stuff is amazing for helping with boots on and off.  (I use a heated boot bag so getting them on is not an issue.  However taking off cold boots I now leave my foot in the liner and it comes out of the shell relatively easily if it's been sprayed with the food grade silicon.  Saves a lot of pain on the instep too since the boot shell is digging into the liner rather than my foot.

post #12 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Toecutter View Post
 

Pulling the tongue laterally while pulling the medial shell further medially is a good trick. This technique is probably easier to show that to describe.

This is good.  I will add;   to insert your foot angled a bit either medially or laterally,  with your knee forward a bit;  you'll find what is best for you by trial.

  And IMO that is a -firm- pull Toecutter is describing.

post #13 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Noah View Post
 

This is good.  I will add;   to insert your foot angled a bit either medially or laterally,  with your knee forward a bit;  you'll find what is best for you by trial.

  And IMO that is a -firm- pull Toecutter is describing.


Yes, thank you. You're basically pulling the boot wide open. Maybe I can load a video of the technique.

post #14 of 25

Put me in the warm boot club for putting them on. The getting off issue requires a hair dryer.

post #15 of 25

i use a blend of keeping my boots warm using the car heater in foot well , then use the lateral tongue pull as described above , to get off i wedge the rear of boot under car wheel and walk out of them . used to think this was all a right pain , but my quests are the best fitting boot I've ever had so will put up with it 

post #16 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by Atomicman View Post

My boots are impossible to get into. I never do it in the parking lot. Not gonna happen. 

Head RAptor WC 150RD with custom foam lace up liner. 

So 2 things. I bring a little folding portable hair dryer to the lodge in my pack. 

And I am the one who mentioned Food Grade Silicone Spray. This is used to preserve and lubricate Dry Suit Seals which are rubber. You can easily find it online /at a dive shop. One treatment lasts at a least 4-6 times of skiing.    I spray the back of the liner and the inside of the spine of the shell. Really helps. Doesn't take much just a small burst!
very 
http://www.amazon.com/Conair-1600-Folding-Handle-Dryer/dp/B000094ZDX/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1453343893&sr=8-6&keywords=foldable+travel+hair+dryer
Putting on a 150 flex boot-not bad.
Taking off a 150 flex boot cold...ug. Goodbye heels!
post #17 of 25

 

 

Funny, this is the same hair dryer that I have.  

post #18 of 25

Dare I pose the question--are your boots too small? I was talked into sizing down a full size from my already somewhat sized down size and was sweating after attempting to jam my foot in there...with assistance. 

post #19 of 25

Y'all are in luck. I'm not sure how well it works but at least you can rock out with your **** out to the heavy metal soundtrack.

 

http://www.outdoorlogicsolutions.com/

post #20 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by SkiMangoJazz View Post
 

 

 

Funny, this is the same hair dryer that I have.  

Thumbs Up

post #21 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post


Putting on a 150 flex boot-not bad.
Taking off a 150 flex boot cold...ug. Goodbye heels!

MIne are easier to get off than get on. 

 

Keep in mine my go off and on with the liner laced on my foot!  And I let them warm up for a few minutes before dislodging from my foot!

post #22 of 25

For what it's worth, I just went down a full size, but my new boots are easier to get on than the old boots. The drop in size is partly due to losing some weight and partly due to some improvement in the swelling of my left ankle. The latter MAY be somewhat related to weight, but is primarily due to an old injury to my left calf. Both the old and new boots required some heat adjustment to open up the curve of the tongue.

 

So anyway, in side side-by-side comparison, my brand new, adjusted but not even broken in Tecnica Ten.2 are easier to get on than my old Salomons, even though my foot was swimming around in the old boots, and the new boots are a little stiffer. Pulling up on the tongue loop helps a LOT on the Tecnica, much more than it did on the Salomans.

post #23 of 25

I use this product with my Lange RS's.  http://boosterstrap.com/product/slide-on/ 

It really works!  I have an artificial hip, which somewhat limits my range of motion to get the optimal foot position when putting them on.  I was extremely [leased and somewhat amazed how easy the boots went on.  One application lasts a long time and I've seen no ill effect on the bladder.  Best $12 I've ever spent!

Bob

post #24 of 25
One othe suggestion is poly sheet 4 or 6 mil, slippery as h*##. Place in boot behind heel and over arch and slide the foot in. Less wear and tear on the foot and liner.
post #25 of 25
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldschoolskier View Post

One othe suggestion is poly sheet 4 or 6 mil, slippery as h*##. Place in boot behind heel and over arch and slide the foot in. Less wear and tear on the foot and liner.

We have one of these in the shop and it is really useful.  Works great.

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