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Drill question!

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Our old drills are coming to the end of their life cycle. I met this Bosch rep and he said this is good drill. Any thoughts? We live in a cold climate. Regular tems -10deg. What are you guys using?

 

post #2 of 12

I use a 2-speed Ryobi from Home Depot.  I bought Dewalt, but the first speed is too fast for roto corking.  The Roybi runs a touch slower at the first speed, doesn't have a lot of run out, and corks nicely. Bosch's are excellent drills, just check to low end speed against the recommended RPMs for corking.

post #3 of 12
I'm assuming the op is asking for setting gates and netting.
I don't know the exact model we use but when have a slew of drills from dewalt to ryobi to bosch etc.
Personally I've found the Bosch the best to use, enough power, battery seems to last etc.
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by hbear View Post

I'm assuming the op is asking for setting gates and netting.
I don't know the exact model we use but when have a slew of drills from dewalt to ryobi to bosch etc.
Personally I've found the Bosch the best to use, enough power, battery seems to last etc.

 

Thanks guys. Sorry for not mentioning that in this case the drills would be used for setting gates. But can be used to brush skis as well off course.

 

Some of the new drills are fitted with this hammer feature. Is there any use for it? They cost about 50dollars more.

post #5 of 12

I've only ever used the hammer feature on a drill for drilling concrete. 

post #6 of 12

No hammers on ours, don't see why you'd need it.  Even if setting on ice, the current bits can rip right through it.

 

Most of the time, going to be drilling through snow/hardpack which is little work for these drills.

post #7 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks hbear.

post #8 of 12


We normally use Makitas.  No hammer feature required (unless you have some serious ice there!)    Also for the drill bit, the new composite ones are excellent


Edited by ScotsSkier - 1/20/16 at 10:38pm
post #9 of 12

agree the composite ones (ours are bright orange) seem to work great.  However the cutting diameter might be a hair larger than our old bits though (finding our full SL gates start tilting on occasion after many, many laps, where they hadn't before).

post #10 of 12

looks just like what we have. works well.

 

-10C ... that's balmy!

post #11 of 12

I'm on year two with Bosch and have been happy. 

post #12 of 12

I would say that the drill doesn't matter as much as the bit. The plastic Orange Fox bits put much less strain on the drill than metal bits, and pretty much any drill seems to work. I would also recommend getting one with a brushless motor. Between the plastic bits and the brushless motors, you are carrying a lot less weight, and batteries seem to last a long time. We use Dewalts (DCD790D2). The drills are about $130 USD (body only) and additional 5ah batteries about the same for a pack of two (you can drill a lot of holes on a 5ah battery), so replacement parts are pretty inexpensive. My drill with the small 2ah battery (good for 2.5-3 full-length GS courses) weighs about 1.9 kg. The Dewalts are light, inexpensive and have good battery life, but I don't find them to be a particularly high quality product. I'm on year 2 with mine, and it's fine. Bosch drills are good, but again get the one with a brushless motor. Milwaukee is probably the best compromise of price, power, weight and quality, and likely what I would buy if I were buying again. With Makita you have your choice of overkill for our needs or a lower quality product with mediocre battery life, and Makita batteries are older technology. If you are independent, buy what you like. If you are with a program, buy what everyone else is using so you can borrow batteries or chargers when needed. The Dewalt is the lightest drill with the most power, and the DCD790 model pairs nicely with the Orange Fox bits.

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