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Wedge to Parallel - the Hockey Stop - Page 3

post #61 of 64
Quote:
Originally Posted by vindibona1 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 

 Interesting.  This was the case at the mountain where I used to teach.  Fear when getting off that lift messed with the heads a large percentage of newbie adults.  Progressing from that point was let's say "difficult."

Why were these students in a situation where there was the potential for fear? 


It was the terrain available.  Only two options.  

1.  Stay on the crowded small magic carpet area once they could turn left and right and stop and go slow or faster.  

No one wanted to do that.  They were there to ski.

2.  Or they could go up the lift.  

Just saying, adult beginner terrain options are not always optimal.


Edited by LiquidFeet - 1/21/16 at 5:27pm
post #62 of 64

I usually work wedge to parallel by emphasizing 2 footed steering/edging. Since right from the start I point out turn shape is the best way to control speed/stop I find hockey stops are a way to get peoples attention, but sort of off to the side of the most direct path to turns for most of my clients.   

 

 

Quote:

Originally Posted by LiquidFeet View Post
 


It was the terrain available.  

Stay on the crowded small magic carpet area once they could turn left and right and go slow or faster.  No one wanted to do that.  They were there to ski.

Or they could go up the lift - no other options.  Just saying, adult beginner terrain options are not always optimal.

 

 

 Absolutely! I've always worked at areas that are level one challenged shall we say. Particularly this December with lack of terrain down low I spent lots more time then usual helping people make friends with the diagonal slide or side slips. The nice thing is once they can feather both skis edges into a slide it's fairly easy to teach two footed steering into the turn.

post #63 of 64

So I have been thinking about this more and had some thoughts on the topic, to preface it I am not an instructor and never have been. That being said the few friends I have tried to teach have always had a fear of the acceleration experienced as they enter the fall line. As such they exhibited the habit of simply going too slow to turn because they knew as soon  as they turned they would accelerate. The hockey stop provides them with a tool to deal with that acceleration while keeping their bodies in the fall line. With that tool you reduce the fear they have which in my very limited experience is often the biggest hurdle to adult beginners progressing. That alone seems to make teaching the hockey stop as a step to parallel a valuable thing.

 

The second thought I had on this was that to properly execute a hockey stop the skier has to be centered on their skis. Being in the backseat doesn't allow for the stability required to properly execute the maneuver. The con as others have stated is that is executed with an inclination into the hill which is not a habit that we want beginners forming.

post #64 of 64

There are times when a hockey stop can be the last resort between hitting an obstacle, going off the trail in to the trees or other skier following a hooked edge or other near disaster when you have little time or distance to carve your way out of the impending doom.

 

 

If you're about to hit a snowboarder, the slapshop might be a better tool to use..:rotflmao:

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