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cheap easy waxing

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

First off, I'm no racer or purist. I just want to protect my skis a little more and get through the flats a little easier.

 

I have never waxed skis before. My current skis have 13 days on them since the last waxing (hot wax applied by Snowbasin repair shop). I want to know the easiest, simplest way to wax my skis.

 

Is an iron required for my purposes? There was a Snowbasin worker the other day standing outside the lift line waxing skis for $3 on the spot. He rubbed a red candle looking stick of wax on the bases, and ran it over a machine that had 2 spinning rolls of brushes. He was done in about 45 seconds. Could I get some cheap decent all weather wax and just rub it in with a brush/cloth/etc? 

 

If that isn't reasonable, then I will get a $3 goodwill iron but youtube tells me I still need a scraper, brush, and wax(obviously). I think a sharpened ruler would work decent as a scraper or maybe even an old ski pass. What would be a good value all weather wax (emphasis on value)? Would paraffin work for my purposes?

post #2 of 9
You should try that out and see how it works.
post #3 of 9
By using the search function, you should find any amount of info on this forum. Type "cheap wax" and start reading.

Buy bulk universal hydrocarbon wax, any brand made for skis. Plastic scraper, horse hair brush, cheap iron. You'll need a way to keep the skis steady.

By the way, you generally get what you pay for, not just from a money perspective, but also a time and effort perspective. Spray and rub stuff comes off about as fast as you put it on.
post #4 of 9

I'm a real cheapskate and I don't care to have finely tuned skis, just ones that go downhill OK.  Here's what I do:

 

Tools: Old used iron set to silk or rayon, piece of plexiglass cut into a square with straight sides for a scraper, a green Scotch Brite type dish scrubber, two sawhorses, two lengths of old wire, and a couple of rags.

 

Every three ski days I take my skis and turn them over on the two sawhorses, bases up.  I wipe them (brushing would work) and then crayon some ski wax onto them.  Next I take the heated iron and melt the crayoned wax on the ski bases making sure that I move the iron constantly and not leave it in one spot.  When the wax is melted and the skis have cooled I scrape the wax off the bases and then run the scrubber over them a bit (only a few seconds needed for this) so they look all slick and oily. 

 

When you crayon the wax instead of melting it on you can still get complete coverage without using up a bunch of wax that gets all over everything when you scrape it off and it turns into flakes.  It's a lot cheaper too; I've been using the same stick of wax for years, and I wax my skis about 20 times per season.  I can't tell the difference in the final product between crayoning the wax onto the ski and dripping.

 

The two pieces of wire are used to hold back the brakes so that you can work on the entire base of each ski without the brakes getting in your way.

 

I paid nothing for the iron, $5 at a garage sale for the wax, a few cents for the scrubber, the same for the scraper, nothing for the wire and rags, and I already had the sawhorses.

post #5 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by kbat11700 View Post
 

First off, I'm no racer or purist. I just want to protect my skis a little more and get through the flats a little easier.

 

I have never waxed skis before. My current skis have 13 days on them since the last waxing (hot wax applied by Snowbasin repair shop). I want to know the easiest, simplest way to wax my skis.

 

Is an iron required for my purposes? There was a Snowbasin worker the other day standing outside the lift line waxing skis for $3 on the spot. He rubbed a red candle looking stick of wax on the bases, and ran it over a machine that had 2 spinning rolls of brushes. He was done in about 45 seconds. Could I get some cheap decent all weather wax and just rub it in with a brush/cloth/etc? 

 

If that isn't reasonable, then I will get a $3 goodwill iron but youtube tells me I still need a scraper, brush, and wax(obviously). I think a sharpened ruler would work decent as a scraper or maybe even an old ski pass. What would be a good value all weather wax (emphasis on value)? Would paraffin work for my purposes?


Good luck on all that.  I say you just shine the whole idea and forget about waxing at all.  YOU will never know the difference.

post #6 of 9
Use the cheapo iron, warm the ski by passing it back and forth, touch the wax to the iron and rub it onto the ski, iron in the bit of wax that sticks, polish with the back of an old leather glove.
post #7 of 9

time versus money.


You can get a block of hertel and just rub and optionally cork or scotchbrite that in.  They have a video on youtube/website demonstrating the techinque.

It won't last as long and you'll be expending a lot of elbow grease to do it every day.

 

If you get a cheap iron, then it's another time versus money argument.

 How much is your time worth it to go with the hassle of smoking wax?  How much is having really smoothly gliding skis worth it to you versus good enough?

 

You can definitely just use old credit card/hotel keys to scrape off the bulk of the wax, especially if you just are geting the bulk of the wax and doing it semi-warm.  

 

Or don't scrape at all and just let the snow do the rest of the work. 

 

It's all up to you to decide what's worth it.

post #8 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by raytseng View Post
 

time versus money.


You can get a block of hertel and just rub and optionally cork or scotchbrite that in.  They have a video on youtube/website demonstrating the techinque.

It won't last as long and you'll be expending a lot of elbow grease to do it every day.

 

If you get a cheap iron, then it's another time versus money argument.

 How much is your time worth it to go with the hassle of smoking wax?  How much is having really smoothly gliding skis worth it to you versus good enough?

 

You can definitely just use old credit card/hotel keys to scrape off the bulk of the wax, especially if you just are geting the bulk of the wax and doing it semi-warm.  

 

Or don't scrape at all and just let the snow do the rest of the work. 

 

It's all up to you to decide what's worth it.


Smoking wax?  Credit cards?  Let the snow do the work?  Well.....he did say cheap!

post #9 of 9
Thread Starter 
I think I will go ahead and buy a cheap iron from goodwill, a block of wax from the clearance bin at a sports store, and see where I go from there. You guys have me exactly the information I needed. Thank you.
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