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Snow sticking to yer boot bottoms making it hard to click in

post #1 of 29
Thread Starter 

Mrs5150 had a heck of time clicking into her bindings after walking in snow to the lift. Build up due to walking on snow took her a while before she could get her skis on. More so than usual due to conditions. Generally banging boots with ski pole handles does the trick, but not today.

 

Suggestions?

post #2 of 29
I switched from the ski pole method to the scape on the heel piece method.
post #3 of 29

Someone told me to spray the soles with PAM. Didn't work. I broke a ski pole banging on my boots. I use the binding scrape method but gingerly--plastic has been known to break. If things are nasty I use the tip of the ski pole, which doesn't work in confined spaces.

post #4 of 29

I've always scraped on the buckles of the other boot -- they're metal, so I don't worry about breaking anything, but also easy to do just standing in one place. Kind of messy sometimes, since the snow can fly everywhere. But it's always worked, even with some pretty icy buildup.

post #5 of 29

And if it's really bad and you're with Mrs5150 have her stand on one foot, bend the other knee  so you can hold her boot with the boot sole facing you then use the tip of your pole to scrape the boot sole clean.  She then inserts clean boot into her binding (having previously brushed off the excess snow).  Then repeat with her other foot.  You'll be a hero.  As mentioned above, if in a congested area be mindful of the other end of your pole while cleaning her boot.

post #6 of 29

Depending on temp and snow moisture content it's really easy for clingy snow to clump onto boot soles. Often this will happen after coming out of a warm lodge and getting back on skis, but it can happen anytime.

 

I've done the pole whack method, the binding scrape method - neither are reliable and are definitely not good for the equipment. What I do now is grab a pole down by the basket with the tip sticking out, use the other pole to help balance as I stand on one foot, then bend the boot out and up, (over the knee of the other leg, like the way a guy sits cross-legged),  and thoroughly scrape the heel and toe clean with the pole tip. Click in after that without touching snow again, then repeat for the other boot.

 

I also have gotten into the habit of doing this.

 

Works for me.

post #7 of 29

Binding scrape method. Been doing it for 40 years and never broken anything, AND it cleans the soles just fine.

 

Don't overthink this.

post #8 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
 

Mrs5150 had a heck of time clicking into her bindings after walking in snow to the lift. Build up due to walking on snow took her a while before she could get her skis on. More so than usual due to conditions. Generally banging boots with ski pole handles does the trick, but not today.

 

Suggestions?

I have seen people break their pole , particularly if it's cold, so scraping with pole is OK...don't bang on your boot with your pole 

 

It also does not do your bindings any service to scrape and bang on 'em. 

 

If you risers on your ski, slide the bottom of the bottonm across the edge of the plate.

post #9 of 29


At the risk of starting a small war here, I can offer a remedy. The stomp plate, or the pad you step on to retract the brakes on Knee Bindings is Designed to act as a boot scraper. And it really works well. A couple of passes  across it removes any and all snow from the bottom of the boot. Why no one else has thought of this is a real mystery.

post #10 of 29

Carry a small ice scraper.  I used to carry one all the time when I was teaching kids a lot.

post #11 of 29

Whack, whack, whack with the pole...scrape, scrape, scrape on the binding...step in. It's worked for 40 years.

post #12 of 29

Another alternative: Cat Tracks, Ski Skooty's Yak Tracks or similar solve that problem nicely. You can take them off and click into your bindings while those around you are hopping around on one leg trying to see if they have succeeded in  getting that stubborn clump of compacted snow off their boot sole after kicking their bindings or poking at their sole with their pole while also doing a one legged hop.  It is much easier to knock any snow off the bottom of your sole protectors while they're in your hand than standing on one leg attempting a visual snow inspection/removal of your boot sole.

 

Just bring along a zip-lock bag to put them in when not in use and stuff them in your jacket's side pocket. Plus, you don't wear out your boot soles and have some additional traction when walking around on icy pavement, cement, metal stairs and such.

post #13 of 29

I have had decent results from treating the boot soles with Zardoz Notwax. Once or twice per season and the snow releases easier.

post #14 of 29
My bindings have a small ridge on top of the toe piece that I can only assume is for boot scraping. I can't see any other purpose for it, and it's too small to be decorative.

It really doesn't take a lot of force to scrape off your boot, so I can't see how someone would damage their bindings doing so. Hell, scraping my boots can't be anywhere near as bad on my bindings as what baggage handlers do to my ski bag.

For me, all it takes is one light forward scrape to clear the heel and one back for the toe for each boot. Easy peasy.
post #15 of 29

I've always just used my hand and/or pole tip to break off the hard stuff, and then done a few scrapes on my binding before clipping in. Has always worked for me and it's quick and easy. I wouldn't whack it with a pole, seems like a good way to break/damage the shaft. 

post #16 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by ddanks View Post
 

I've always scraped on the buckles of the other boot -- they're metal, so I don't worry about breaking anything, but also easy to do just standing in one place. Kind of messy sometimes, since the snow can fly everywhere. But it's always worked, even with some pretty icy buildup.

Buckles can definitely break. I have a 1964 Fender Tremolux amplifier with more original tubes than my 8 year old Rossi boots have original buckles--and they keep getting harder to find (originial tubes and replacement buckles both).

post #17 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Buckles can definitely break. I have a 1964 Fender Tremolux amplifier with more original tubes than my 8 year old Rossi boots have original buckles--and they keep getting harder to find (originial tubes and replacement buckles both).


Good to know. (Though if the buckles break, then perhaps I'll have an excuse to get new boots... :devil:)

post #18 of 29

I always use the tip of my pole, followed by a hand wipe. I've been tempted to try silicone spray on the soles of the boots which I suspect will work, at least temporarily.

post #19 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by snofun3 View Post
 

Binding scrape method. Been doing it for 40 years and never broken anything, AND it cleans the soles just fine.

 

Don't overthink this.

Same for 50 years.  However, about a week ago at a demo day I did this in front of a ski rep three times with three different pairs of skis that I demoed consecutively for about 30 mins each, actually he was the ski company owner and his crew, and I felt kind of bad stepping on and scraping up the binding toe piece on his pristine skis.  :o

 

But it works and takes a lot less dexterity than trying to lift the sole of the boot and poking at it with a ski pole.

post #20 of 29

I've always been a whacker, now I'm a whacker and a scraper, the scraping mainly to confirm that the whacking got it all.  My whacking pole is bent but that was from being a doofus getting on the lift:dunno

 

Been doing this for decades, but not quite as many as the geezers above ;-)

post #21 of 29
My first pair of boots was terrible in this regard. Since I was a beginner I was always falling, losing a ski and having to get them back on, and it would frequently take me 10 minutes to get the snow off my soles. The usual stuff like scraping on the bindings or with a pole didn't work. Instructors would try to help and they were always surprised at how hard it was to get the snow off.

I got a new pair of boots (for other reasons) and the problem was gone. I would have dumped that first pair sooner had I know the snow sticking was so bad just with those. So if this is going on with your wife-it's really bad with these boots and the usual stuff doesn't work-consider getting different ones.
post #22 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr5150 View Post
 

Mrs5150 had a heck of time clicking into her bindings after walking in snow to the lift. Build up due to walking on snow took her a while before she could get her skis on. More so than usual due to conditions. Generally banging boots with ski pole handles does the trick, but not today.

 

Suggestions?

 

Binding scrape almost always.  Still have an old habit of occasionally whacking it with my pole.  I have rather sturdy poles.

post #23 of 29

I just have the valet scrape them for me.  I tip them a buck or two for their service.

 

 

 

 

:duck::rotflmao:

post #24 of 29

I just thump the toe of one boot against the heel of the other, scrape across top of binding if necessary.  Click in, rinse and repeat for the other boot.  Hasn't failed yet.

post #25 of 29

Pam frying pan spray works for me even better than silicone lube spray.  Try either one.

 

When you next buy new boots, buy Cat Tracks or something similar.  Use them every time.  Abrasion from walking on pavement makes more snow stick to the boot soles.

post #26 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance View Post
 

I just have the valet scrape them for me.  I tip them a buck or two for their service.

 

 

 

 

:duck::rotflmao:

haha. sounds like a Deer Valley service!

post #27 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackke17 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance View Post
 

I just have the valet scrape them for me.  I tip them a buck or two for their service.

 

 

 

 

:duck::rotflmao:

haha. sounds like a Deer Valley service!

 

Pardon the brief thread drift (sort of) but the above quote was just too good a segue into my experience last week at the Ritz Carlton Club at North Star.

 

My brother had traded some time from his Marriott / S. Lake Tahoe condo for a week at N*.  Among other "extravagancies" at “the Club”, each morning, prior to heading out, your skis were placed on the snow just outside the door, poles on each side.  And yes, they offered to scrape your boot soles if requested.  This was after their offer to assist you in putting your boots on (which of course had been dried and warmed overnight).   Same scenario in reverse after skiing, with free hot chocolate and/or coffee available while removing your boots.  (And of course skis would be tuned overnight if desired).   Wouldn’t take much to get used to such a life.  (Especially when coupled with the 30” of new snow that week at N* and the Friday morning bluebird day skiing “pillows” for the first time in 18” of fresh powder).

 

Now, back to discussion of scraping our own boots.:eek

post #28 of 29

Was way worse with Spademen bindings.. Binding scrape doesn't work out on the mountain in deeper snow because the ski moves when the brake won't hold it in place.  Spraying any kind of lubricant or wax on your boot soles is a formula for casualties across wet floors or lodge steps.

 

I have a solution though..

 

 

post #29 of 29
Quote:
Originally Posted by jdleuck View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackke17 View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance View Post
 

I just have the valet scrape them for me.  I tip them a buck or two for their service.

 

 

 

 

:duck::rotflmao:

haha. sounds like a Deer Valley service!

 

Pardon the brief thread drift (sort of) but the above quote was just too good a segue into my experience last week at the Ritz Carlton Club at North Star.

 

My brother had traded some time from his Marriott / S. Lake Tahoe condo for a week at N*.  Among other "extravagancies" at “the Club”, each morning, prior to heading out, your skis were placed on the snow just outside the door, poles on each side.  And yes, they offered to scrape your boot soles if requested.  This was after their offer to assist you in putting your boots on (which of course had been dried and warmed overnight).   Same scenario in reverse after skiing, with free hot chocolate and/or coffee available while removing your boots.  (And of course skis would be tuned overnight if desired).   Wouldn’t take much to get used to such a life.  (Especially when coupled with the 30” of new snow that week at N* and the Friday morning bluebird day skiing “pillows” for the first time in 18” of fresh powder).

 

Now, back to discussion of scraping our own boots.:eek

I suspect the main reason luxury, and not so luxury, ski hotels have such good ski and boot service is to keep people from taking their skis and wearing their boots up to their rooms.

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