or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Should I get bindings adjusted?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Should I get bindings adjusted?

post #1 of 9
Thread Starter 

Hi everyone. We are intermediate? skiers. Only get get out 2x a year b/c of where we live.

Anyway, bought a used (new to him) pair of skis for my son. He is close in height/shoe size to the previous owner,

but weighs 50 lbs lighter. Should we be getting the bindings adjusted? Something I could do myself?

Thanks for the help.

post #2 of 9

Yes, you could do it but you couldn't do a torque test.... plus you may not do it correctly.  And the ski may have to be redrilled to be able to set the forward pressure correctly.  Bottom line, why would you risk your sons knees/ligaments to save a few bucks.  Take it in to a shop!

post #3 of 9

You could do it yourself. It is not hard. But there are things it pays to know and have a bit of a feel for with respect to bindings in general and whatever specific bindings you now have. Unless you have some experience with it, or someone with experience to walk you though initially, you can easily goof up. Goofing up can result in injury.

 

For my .02, take them to a reliable shop and have them adjusted.

post #4 of 9
IIRC DIN/TUV standards allow bindings to pass with a variation of +/- 1 visual indicator settings range. For an intermediate skier using a level II, I would recommend having them torque tested because at that level if your bindings release at a lower value than what the visual indicated levels are you could get hurt if you loose a ski at the wrong moment.
post #5 of 9
You need to provide more information such as how old is your son, how much does he weigh, how tall is he, what is the Boot Sole Length (BSL) of you son's boots, what is the make/model/length of the skis, how old are the skis, what bindings are already on the skis?

By providing scant information, you're not going to tap into the full wisdom of epicski.
post #6 of 9

Most people adjust the DIN setting by themselves using a DIN Number Chart or On-line Calculator.

That has to be done, and is fairly simple to do. 

 

A lot of people forget to adjust the foreward pressure.  That is a little bit harder to do, and the exact method depends on the particular binding used (e.g. most volkls have a screw that screws into the heel housing and must be flush when the boot is in the binding, Tyrolias have a tab on the bottom that with a scribed range that must align with the heel housing when the boot is in the binding, All have some sort of marker that moves as the boot is clamped down and must be within a specified range).

 

If you do decide to do it yourself make sure you know how to adjust the forward pressure.

 

Torque testing verifies that when you set the DIN to the number given by the chart the binding will in fact release at the torque it is supposed to release at.   New bindings are seldom off.  Old bindings might be off, but you might also want to adjust your DIN setting up or down regardless, so I would not bother with a torque test, but that's just me.  

 

More importantly if the bindings are not on the "indemnified list"  the shop won't touch them.  That is your clue that more than likely the bindings are too old to be considered safe (there are exceptions, but knowing what they are requires expert knowledge).  You could always look up your bindings to see if they are on the current indemnified list.

 

Depending on how badly your local ski shops want to serve you properly or how badly they want to rip you off, it might be best to have them set the binding and torque test it.    Best advice is to phone them and get them to tell you what they would charge for that service.   It should not cost more than 20 bucks, imho.  The money spent would then be a bargain considering the peace of mind obtained.

post #7 of 9

You can make this as complicated as you want...

 

As noted, every binding needs DIN and forward pressure adjustment. Many need downward pressure adjusted. Some need wing adjustment. Not all of these are done in the same way on all bindings. Some bindings are more particular than others with respect to how you go about this. So while quite simple once you know what you are doing - you need to know what you are doing.

 

The simple answer is: if you are not familiar with this stuff, are not interested in getting into arcane gear stuff, and do not have someone to show you the ropes - just have a reputable shop adjust and test them. Done.


Edited by spindrift - 1/15/16 at 5:29pm
post #8 of 9

To elaborate so that you understand how these things work, not so you do it yourself--the basic settings on every binding are the DIN setting and the forward pressure. The DIN value sets the amount of force required to release the binding and is dependent on the height, weight, ability, boot sole length and age of the skier. The correct value is taken from a chart which can be found on line and is easily set with a screw driver--looking at the window with lots of little numbers on the toe and the heel one turns the screwdriver until the indicator in the window lines up with the desired number. This is set with the boot out of the binding.

 

The heelpiece is spring loaded and when you step into the binding the heel piece moves back and presses forward on the boot. Setting the forward pressure means moving the heel back or forward so that the pressure is correct for the particular boot. Different bindings use different ways of moving the heel and different indicators of correct forward pressure. The forward pressure is set with the boot out of the binding but checked for the correct pressure with the boot in the binding.

 

A lot of bindings have no adjustment for the width and height of the toe wings. The toe piece  height, if it is adjustable, is measure by putting a 0.5 mm card on the antifriction device of the toe piece and clicking in the boot. The card should pull out with some resistance--it shouldn't be loose or pull out with difficulty.

 

Even if you do all this you don't know if the binding is working properly. The binding itself could be bad or the boot may have problems. A shop will torque test the binding to make sure the heel and toe release with the proper amount of force appropriate for the DIN setting selected. This part you can't do yourself.

 

Since you didn't know that the binding would have to be readjusted for a lighter skier (and whose boot length might be very different despite similar shoe size) you would clearly be best off going to a shop. Still, you should learn how to figure the proper DIN for your son and how the forward pressure is set and checked so that you can see if the shop did it right. 

post #9 of 9
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

To elaborate so that you understand how these things work, not so you do it yourself--the basic settings on every binding are the DIN setting and the forward pressure. The DIN value sets the amount of force required to release the binding and is dependent on the height, weight, ability, boot sole length and age of the skier. The correct value is taken from a chart which can be found on line and is easily set with a screw driver--looking at the window with lots of little numbers on the toe and the heel one turns the screwdriver until the indicator in the window lines up with the desired number. This is set with the boot out of the binding.

 

The heelpiece is spring loaded and when you step into the binding the heel piece moves back and presses forward on the boot. Setting the forward pressure means moving the heel back or forward so that the pressure is correct for the particular boot. Different bindings use different ways of moving the heel and different indicators of correct forward pressure. The forward pressure is set with the boot out of the binding but checked for the correct pressure with the boot in the binding.

 

A lot of bindings have no adjustment for the width and height of the toe wings. The toe piece  height, if it is adjustable, is measure by putting a 0.5 mm card on the antifriction device of the toe piece and clicking in the boot. The card should pull out with some resistance--it shouldn't be loose or pull out with difficulty.

 

Even if you do all this you don't know if the binding is working properly. The binding itself could be bad or the boot may have problems. A shop will torque test the binding to make sure the heel and toe release with the proper amount of force appropriate for the DIN setting selected. This part you can't do yourself.

 

Since you didn't know that the binding would have to be readjusted for a lighter skier (and whose boot length might be very different despite similar shoe size) you would clearly be best off going to a shop. Still, you should learn how to figure the proper DIN for your son and how the forward pressure is set and checked so that you can see if the shop did it right. 


^^^This right here.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Should I get bindings adjusted?