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Complications for Picabo

post #1 of 19
Thread Starter 
post #2 of 19

Wow, I suspect there's more than a kernel of truth to the allegation.  Any prosecutor, sane and worth their salt, isn't going to pick that highly publicized legal fight without a good set of facts on their side...at least I sure as heck wouldn't!

 

I took enough abuse for charging a mayo clinic doctor with driving drunk and then some for good measure apparently (911 calls from a major highway where the car nearly sideswiped 3 others), and that type of charge doesn't get the emotions revving like an allegation of physically abusing one's own parent.

post #3 of 19

Ummm...wow.    Just wow.

post #4 of 19

It was on the news.  Didn't pay close attention but something about a fight and allegedly he grabbed her by the hair so she shoved him down the stairs and locked him in the basement.

post #5 of 19
Since when has Picabo been rooming with Hope Solo?
post #6 of 19
Thread Starter 
There seems to have been quite a lag before the charges were filed. Which sort of indicates that maybe whatever stories were provided have "stabilized". I initially thought maybe he was drunk, given that he drove into the house. But that wasn't mentioned anywhere.
post #7 of 19

She inspired a lot of young women.  If it does turn out that she is guilty of assault it will be very sad.

post #8 of 19
Thread Starter 
Yes, we have an autographed picture addressed to my daughter framed along our ski wall. Hoping this turns out better.
post #9 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Since when has Picabo been rooming with Hope Solo?


They let her visit him at the hospital.  When the reporters called, she answered "Picaboo, I.C.U."..:duck:

post #10 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

There seems to have been quite a lag before the charges were filed.

 

Oh is that why the booking photo says 'December'?     I thought there ,might have been a separate incident.

post #11 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdave69 View Post
 

Wow, I suspect there's more than a kernel of truth to the allegation.  Any prosecutor, sane and worth their salt, isn't going to pick that highly publicized legal fight without a good set of facts on their side...at least I sure as heck wouldn't!

 

I took enough abuse for charging a mayo clinic doctor with driving drunk and then some for good measure apparently (911 calls from a major highway where the car nearly sideswiped 3 others), and that type of charge doesn't get the emotions revving like an allegation of physically abusing one's own parent.


Apparently you know not about our system of mandatory arrest and prosecution laws for DV. System is very very broken.

 

http://nation.time.com/2013/02/27/whats-wrong-with-the-violence-against-women-act/

 

Domestic violence is still a severely under-reported crime and some critics say mandatory arrest policies have exacerbated this problem. These policies, which existed in some states before VAWA but became more common after early versions of VAWA encouraged them, require police officers responding to domestic violence calls to arrest alleged abusers if there is probable cause to believe assaults have taken place. The intent of these laws was to spur a culture change in law enforcement, which had a long history of declining to intervene in domestic violence situations.

post #12 of 19

oh, mandatory arrest means mandatory charging does it?  guess I'm missing the logic since the choice of charging is certainly within the prosecutors discretion not law enforcements.  Having prosecuted hundreds of domestic cases you may be assured that I'm keenly aware of mandatory arrest. 

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by BullOfTheWoods View Post
 


Apparently you know not about our system of mandatory arrest and prosecution laws for DV. System is very very broken.

 

http://nation.time.com/2013/02/27/whats-wrong-with-the-violence-against-women-act/

 

Domestic violence is still a severely under-reported crime and some critics say mandatory arrest policies have exacerbated this problem. These policies, which existed in some states before VAWA but became more common after early versions of VAWA encouraged them, require police officers responding to domestic violence calls to arrest alleged abusers if there is probable cause to believe assaults have taken place. The intent of these laws was to spur a culture change in law enforcement, which had a long history of declining to intervene in domestic violence situations.

post #13 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcdave69 View Post
 

oh, mandatory arrest means mandatory charging does it?  guess I'm missing the logic since the choice of charging is certainly within the prosecutors discretion not law enforcements.  Having prosecuted hundreds of domestic cases you may be assured that I'm keenly aware of mandatory arrest. 

 


To not charge this case would risk loosing federal dollars and would appear to be sexist implementation of the laws (with high profile exposure). Any sane prosecutor would see this as any other case for the machine and leave it to the judge.

Indeed Utah does have a 'no-drop' prosecution law for DV.

http://upc.utah.gov/materials/2015basic/DV101.pdf

 

The Booming Domestic Violence Industry 
The Social-Work Movement that Fights Domestic Violence has Grown Large on State and Federal Tax Monies  

http://www.massnews.com/past_issues/other/8_Aug/domviin.htm


Edited by BullOfTheWoods - 1/15/16 at 11:41am
post #14 of 19
Wouldn't one have to show a pattern for domestic violence?
This sounds like a fight.
post #15 of 19

In a sane legal environment yes, but this is big money flowing from the federal government.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Tog View Post

Wouldn't one have to show a pattern for domestic violence?
This sounds like a fight.
post #16 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 


They let her visit him at the hospital.  When the reporters called, she answered "Picaboo, I.C.U."..:duck:

You do know how bad that is, right??:rolleyes

post #17 of 19

"Zero Tolerance" by the police leads to a "No-Drop" policy by the prosecution. An arrest means the case will be prosecuted. Prosecution offices associated with Family Advocacy Centers will proceed with the case even if the family situation has been resolved. An "Affidavit of Non-Prosecution" is ineffective as this legal document merely reflects what the victim wants to do. The affidavit indicates the family is in healing and desires to work on repairing the marital relationship. The Family Violence Industry does not consider salvaging the marital relationship as an acceptable end result. The "protectors" view of their job entails ending the relationship for the safety of the "victim."

Prosecutors are not concerned with the wishes or needs of the real victim. The "No Drop" policy requires the case to go to trial even if the real victim wants the charges dismissed. "No-Drop" means the government will push the case all the way regardless of hardship upon the family. To the entrepreneurs of the Family Violence Industry, "helping" the victim necessitates separation of the family, enforced through protective orders, followed by divorce. In addition, the helping agenda probably includes loss of employment for the accused spouse, financial hardship, and adding unnecessary emotional stress to a family.

"Zero Tolerance" means that the government, not you, the government, knows what is best for your family and children.
If the government is so concerned about stopping family violence and helping families, why would they push prosecution when the family is asking them not to?

 

sounds like a Maoist police state to me.


Edited by BullOfTheWoods - 1/15/16 at 1:05pm
post #18 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 


They let her visit him at the hospital.  When the reporters called, she answered "Picaboo, I.C.U."..:duck:

 

How dare you be so insensiti...... Oh, wait a minute ... that IS clever. Funny as shit really. Well done my man!  

 

Actually this joke isn't nearly as insensitive as media exposure, unfortunate mug shots and viral distribution of sensitive and private family matters.

 

Luckily for me, I've always been able to squeak in a quick pose for my mug shots.

 

 

pout_gal_ben_stiller.jpg

post #19 of 19
Quote:
Originally Posted by NJskier164 View Post
 

You do know how bad that is, right??:rolleyes


Too soon? :dunno

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