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what does DIN numbers means exactly? how TUV or DIN calculate these numbers? what's the unit of these numbers?

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

hello guys, i am wondering how DIN numbers being calculated...

 

i know it is related to the release force, and depends on the skier's weight etc.

 

i search online and only get DIN chart, can anybody help me with more specific info? or website? or link?

 

:)

post #2 of 12

DIN settings are a standard for release force for a binding, theoretically.  The DIN number that corresponds to you as a skier is arbitrary.  Someone decided that for a person this size, this weight, this level of ability, a DIN setting of 4 is appropriate.  I'm not certain, you can google probably, but there is probably some correlation between the DIN and the physiology of the person.  For instance, a person this tall and weighing this much will require x amount of force before their tibia breaks, therefore we'll use a DIN below that.  I don't know what process led to the DIN settings being chosen specifically.  The idea is, a DIN for 4 means x lbs of force to release the binding no matter who manufactured the binding.  DIN by definition is a standard.

 

Just to expand on this, boot flex is given as a number but is meaningless between manufacturers.  There is no standard.  So a 120 in one boot and a 120 in another could be an entirely different flex in reality.  DIN is meant to make that standard.

post #3 of 12
post #4 of 12
Thread Starter 

thx!i try to find out how DIN numbers being set for a certain manufacture, but all lead to ISO website and all the iso document need to pay... anyway, thanks for explaination!

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 

thanks! but they all need to pay... what a pity...

post #6 of 12

The torque required to release the binding for a given DIN is available in chart form somewhere, I can't find it though.  You can't really test it without a proper testing rig.  I suppose you could half-ass it somehow.  Basically the chart correlates a DIN of 4 with say, a toe rotational release force of 25 ft/lbs and a forward release force of, say, 75 ft/lbs.  Those numbers are not correct, just for illustration.  And the method of measuring may change the numbers to some degree. 

post #7 of 12

DIN stands for Deutsche Industrie Norm. It is the abbreviation for German industrial standards. International industry standards are ISO. In most cases, if something has a DIN standard, it is the same as the ISO standard. Ski binding release is just one thing that is regulated by DIN/ISO standards. Your BMW 3-series conforms to all sorts of DIN standards. So does the lauter tun at the brewery down the road that bought its brewhouse from Bavaria. 

 

The short version is, since binding release is a DIN standard, the amount of torque to release a Tyrolia binding set at 7 is the same to release a Marker, or a Salomon, or a Look. That's the expectation, at least.

 

Now, that means the release will work the same the day that binding comes off the production line. As the binding ages, it won't work exactly as it did when it was brand new. The materials in the binding will slowly degrade, and the torque to release the binding at a given setting will gradually become less and less. An 8 year old binding set at 7 might release at the torque level of a new binding set at 4, for example. Eventually, the materials break down to the point the binding is no longer serviceable. That's when the binding drops off the manufacturer's indemnity list, and no shop will touch it anymore. 

 

As far as how it is calcluated, it's all calculated with kilonewtons of force. Each number on the DIN scale equates to a certain number of kilonewtons to make that binding release. If you want to figure out what those values are, you can probably take your skis into a shop and have them torque tested. If you ask for the test results, a modern Wintersteiger tester gives the kilonewton results for each release. Check your DIN setting, and you know x DIN= y kN. If you can get the kN value for a second DIN, you could probably extrapolate that out across the entire DIN scale. 

post #8 of 12

What if the "DIN" scale isn't linear?   Who can say without reading the standard.....?

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cgrandy View Post
 

What if the "DIN" scale isn't linear?   Who can say without reading the standard.....?


The reality is, if someone really cares that much, they need to understand how the standard was created and read the documentation.  The cost is relatively nominal really.

post #10 of 12

There are two separate issues.  One is the DIN standard as finally published.  The other is the studies on cadavers that determined the torque needed to break legs of various descriptions.  These studies went into determining the DIN numbers  I seem to recall a thread discussing the latter on epic.  Can't find it now though.

post #11 of 12

Your might find copy of all the DIN and BS (British Standard) in your local University library. 

 

Have a look at this - http://www.epicski.com/t/35360/binding-din-settings

post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mdf View Post

Ghost -

I figure theres a 67.8% chance you are teasing us engineers, but I looked at it anyway.


The rows ("Skier code") are linear with weight for the first 6 rows and quadratic after that.


Within a column, the din settings are nearly proportional to weight, with a slight kink between rows 6 and 7.


Within a row, the din is nearly proportional to the inverse of boot sole length.

The DIN levels are a trade-off between broken tibias and releasing too soon. The levels were originally determined by destructive testing of cadavers. On average, bigger people have thicker (therefore stronger) bones. Type III skiers don't have stonger bones, they have different preferences for that tradeoff.

All the functional relationships embodied in the DIN tables make sense if you think about it.

(The quoted post is from 2006, one of my first. Clicking on the odd arrow at the end of the "originally posted by" line will take you there.)
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