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Upcoming Jackson Hole trip, what to expect? [Kendo for early March] - Page 2

post #31 of 36
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post
 

I skied at JHMR for 15 years as a pass holder before turning pro.  I wish I had taken a few lessons during that time.  I taught myself a lot of bad habits that I am still trying to unlearn.

 

Thanks everyone for the advice on lessons. This point hit home. My plan has always been to try a few lessons after I felt like I had hit a plateau. At this point, I'm still feeling improvement every time I'm on the mountain (with some feedback from experienced friends) But the fact that I might be cementing some bad habits that I should nip now and not later is duly noted.

 

All this talk has me foaming at the mouth to get our there though! With over a month to go, I'm still soaking it all in if anyone else stumbles across this post and wants to share their 2 cents

post #32 of 36

If tetonpwdrjunkie has any bad habits that involve skiing, I'm willing to learn them!

post #33 of 36

I have skied 10 consecutive years at JH.  Lots of great advice here.  I would just add,  be careful when skiing the narrow traverses between trails.   JH traverse trails are difficult  to ski for many expert level 7 skiers. Do not ski traverses for the very  first time with low visibility. 

 

As east coast intermediate you should be able to handle the Bridger gondola, Thunder, and Sublette ski lifts and ski the blue trails the first day.  As you get off the Sublette ski over to check out Rendezvous Bowl from the bottom.  With good conditions on a clear day an intermediate can take the TRAM to the top and traverse Rendezvous bowl to get down.   You can always take the TRAM to the top and take ride the TRAM back down. 

 

Outside of that enjoy one of the best places to ski in the USA. 

post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by catskills View Post
 

.... JH traverse trails are difficult  to ski for many expert level 7 skiers. Do not ski traverses for the very  first time with low visibility. 

 

 

. . . Outside of that enjoy one of the best places to ski in the USA. 

Sound advice about the traverses at JHMR. Some are quite narrow with a fair amount of pitch and reasonably tight turns. The real problem is that a mistake could have serious consequences if you wind up getting off the traverse into the adjoining seriously difficult terrain. Not too much of a challenge for any reasonably proficient skier though, except possibly in low-visibility situations.

 

I would quibble with catskills closing quote however: JHMR is one of the best places to ski in North America.

post #35 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by HarkinBanks View Post

Sorry, but unless it's been a 7-10 day high pressure, I would not recommend anything under 100 mm waist at JHMR and/or GTR.

And I've skied each hill a few times.

Could the OP ski their Kendo's at either place? You bet. Could I butcher an elk with a butter knife? Yup. Both could be done, but neither would be much fun.

HB

 

Heh heh!

post #36 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by tetonpwdrjunkie View Post


I ski at JHMR a lot.  

I am a full time instructor at JHMR and have been for 10 seasons.  I teach primarily upper level adult group lessons levels 7-9.  I skied at JHMR for 15 years as a pass holder before turning pro.  I wish I had taken a few lessons during that time.  I taught myself a lot of bad habits that I am still trying to unlearn.  I or one of my peers can help you a lot with your off trail skiing and take you to the best terrain that you might not find on your own.  We do full day and half day PM lessons in groups.  I think group lessons are reasonably priced.  We also offer private lessons which are more expensive.

EDIT:  I would work on the short turn, but the real money turn for off trail at JHMR is a mid to long radius turn with some shmear.  It's a big mountain and those SLTs will make you tired faster.  Also the terrain favors the longer turn through the trees and rocks.  You need to look ahead and make the turn that fits the space you have.  Many people I work with over turn on the steeps and get stuck with the short turn.

I absolutely agree with TPJ about the JH Mountain sports school offering great value for money - except I am a happy client.

One of the things that makes JH so special is the terrain. Get a lesson or two early on and learn some tactics and techniques to embrace it. It would be a shame to go all that way and stick to groomers (not that they aren't good) and miss lots of fun stuff and iconic stuff.

Also wholeheartedly agree about the mid to long radius turn with schmear. It makes many parts of the JH terrain easier, more accessible and fun if you can confidently and safely execute these sorts of turns. The people who were typically stalled seemed to often be stuck with how to use short turns to get through something where a longer schmear turn was a better tactic. Often these same people ended up side-slipping a lot.
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