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Help me pick some ski's

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

I'm 5'10", 220lbs. 35 years old, I've been skiing for about 3 years, and I ski about 15-20 days throughout the year.  I'm 80% groomed and 20% off-piste if there is fresh snow. I like Red Runs the most, but can do some blacks as well.  I'd consider myself at least an intermediate. 

 

Currently I have some Kastle RX Skis in 171CM Length.  They have a waist of 66CM  

http://www.skitest.net/en-ski-rx_national_team_rc-469.shtml

 

I like to go fast on groomers and find that things get a little bumpy for me at speed with my current set-up.  Also I've noticed in the afternoon when going through the steep stuff after the runs have been torn out my bottom leg gets very choppy and wants to slide out a bit.  This could be bad form, I'm not really sure.  I only notice it in the afternoon typically when trying to navigate what area has turned into moguls. I'd like to get better in the powder but my Kastles suck there and conditions aren't normally good so either way I'd probably be sticking with 80% on groomed runs. 

 

I have the rest of this season in Italy (I'm in the Air Force) then will be headed to South Korea next year so should be able to ski a half dozen days there.  I'm looking to spend less the $400 for new ski's and bindings. 

 

Here are some things I've been considering:

 

Elan Waveflex 78 Fusion 176CM $269 w/bindings

 

Elan Waveflex 78 Ti Fusion 176CM $269 w/ bindings

 

Dynastar Powertrack 84 176CM $231 no bindings

 

Elan Amphibio Waveflex 78 176CM $375 w/bindings

 

Blizzard Power 700 176CM $377 w/ bindings

 

Elan Spectrum 85 176CM $379 w/ bindings

 

Rossignol Pursuit 200 176CM $290 no bindings

 

Blizzard Magnum 8.5 174CM $300  no bindings

 

Rossignol Pursuit 18 176CM $413 w/ bindings

 

Volkl RTM 77 176CM $427 w/ bindings

 

The Elans seem like a bargain but I generally feel like you get what you pay for.  I feel they would be a cheap upgrade once I sell my current Castles.  Is there anything you guys recommend of feel like I'm leaving out in my <$400 price range?

 

Thanks,

 

-TIM

post #2 of 27
Sounds strange, are those RX:s of recent vintage? When did you last tune them?
post #3 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karlsson View Post

Sounds strange, are those RX:s of recent vintage? When did you last tune them?


I believe they are about 4 years old.  I bought them used but in pretty good shape a few years ago.  I hadn't got them tuned for this year and went to a shop after skiing this weekend and the place wouldn't even wax them. It was in Italy so something may have been lost in translation but the guy made it sound like they needed too much work and they wouldn't do it. 

 

How long do ski's normally last?  From your tone it sounds like the Kastles should still be fine for me?  At speed they still get a little bouncy on me to the point it freaks me out, so I was thinking I needed a longer ski. 

post #4 of 27

I don't have personal experience from that model, but Kastle RX is supposed to be a good ski from what I hear.

Sounds like the problem might be the tune (and perhaps ski technique). I'm curious to why the shop wouldn't touch them? If you couldn't understand each other, try another one. Where in Italy are you? You could probably get a reccomendation from some one in this forum.

How often to tune depends on what conditions you ski and what type of skiing you do. But minimum before each season, set the edges (with file and stones) and wax them (in your case, let a good shop do it as I suspect you dont DIY). And then put on some new wax for every full week of skiing. Edges are more critical on hard surfaces.

post #5 of 27

From your list of skis in the opening post, I would let go of the Elans and the Dynastar. At your weight, I don't think they would support you enough. At my weight (185 pounds, 85 kg), they do not absorb enough of the terrain - so my knees hurt a lot. With many other skis I don't have that problem.

 

I imagine a K2 AMP Rictor 82 XTI in 177 could work very well. They are not in the current K2 line-up anymore this year, so you might be able to pick up a new pair at a nice price (I've seen them in Austria and in the Dolomites too last Christmas holiday). 

 

IN Europe, my experience is that German web shops have the best deals, even on current models. Check out snow-how.de, xspo.de, sport-conrad.com, sport-bittl.de, or find the best deal of a specific model on idealo.de - best online deals guaranteed.

post #6 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheizz View Post
 

From your list of skis in the opening post, I would let go of the Elans and the Dynastar. At your weight, I don't think they would support you enough. At my weight (185 pounds, 85 kg), they do not absorb enough of the terrain - so my knees hurt a lot. With many other skis I don't have that problem.

 

I imagine a K2 AMP Rictor 82 XTI in 177 could work very well. They are not in the current K2 line-up anymore this year, so you might be able to pick up a new pair at a nice price (I've seen them in Austria and in the Dolomites too last Christmas holiday). 

 

IN Europe, my experience is that German web shops have the best deals, even on current models. Check out snow-how.de, xspo.de, sport-conrad.com, sport-bittl.de, or find the best deal of a specific model on idealo.de - best online deals guaranteed.

 

Thanks I'll checkout some of those sites out.  Italy doesn't seem to have many online deals (or at least not from what I can tell).  I'll skip Elan now but did find it funny I could order from the US for cheaper than the Slovenian websites were selling for as they are made there. 

post #7 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Karlsson View Post
 

I don't have personal experience from that model, but Kastle RX is supposed to be a good ski from what I hear.

Sounds like the problem might be the tune (and perhaps ski technique). I'm curious to why the shop wouldn't touch them? If you couldn't understand each other, try another one. Where in Italy are you? You could probably get a reccomendation from some one in this forum.

How often to tune depends on what conditions you ski and what type of skiing you do. But minimum before each season, set the edges (with file and stones) and wax them (in your case, let a good shop do it as I suspect you dont DIY). And then put on some new wax for every full week of skiing. Edges are more critical on hard surfaces.

 

I don't doubt tune or technique that is for sure. I was attributing what I considered poor performance more towards my weight and needing a long/stiffer ski.  I'm getting them tuned right now so I'll report back after this weekend.  Hopefully this rain I'm getting isn't being wasted in the mountains and we're getting some snow. 

post #8 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis2001r6 View Post
 

 

I don't doubt tune or technique that is for sure. I was attributing what I considered poor performance more towards my weight and needing a long/stiffer ski.  I'm getting them tuned right now so I'll report back after this weekend.  Hopefully this rain I'm getting isn't being wasted in the mountains and we're getting some snow. 


To be honest, I never clicked the link. Presumed it was a "regular" Kastle RX. Being a big boy you might need someting burlier, depending on the flex of the Kastles you already have – haven't heard of that particular RX-model. But before buying new ones, you might want to give the ones you already own a good tune and see if that's the issue.

post #9 of 27

Nothing on that list is -really- going to help you in powder - that's going to be 100% on you and developing technique unless you commit to a full on powder ski.
 

The bottom leg issue is also a technique thing - but boot tweaking might (or not) help you with that.

 

post #10 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by cantunamunch View Post
 

Nothing on that list is -really- going to help you in powder - that's going to be 100% on you and developing technique unless you commit to a full on powder ski.
 

The bottom leg issue is also a technique thing - but boot tweaking might (or not) help you with that.

 

 

I agree on the boot thing. 

To the original poster, how roomy and comfy are your boots?  Do they have good equal pressure all around, or does your heel move around or forefoot have side to side movement?

Also, if your budget gets bumped to $500 - $550 you'll really start to open up to some decent skis.  Everything you listed short of the blizzard has a 10 or 11 DIN rated binding which is pushing it if you are 220 lbs.  12 would be the absolute lowest binder you should be looking at with a 14 or 16 DIN rating being more of the sweet spot.  

post #11 of 27
Thread Starter 
Well I did get new boots last year with a wider calf area. I have big calves and my other boots would literally leave a welt or bruise on my. So I would say my current boots (Rossignol Alias Sensor 90's) fit pretty well.

There may be a little bit of foot slippage, I can't say I've paid too much attention to it. Showing my intermediate level now.

The downhill ski chopping/Slipping issue definitely is more in the afternoon when my quads are toast and trail conditions not as good.

Since we're on the subject of what is most likely my poor technique I swear I can't get my legs close enough to have perfect tight parallel form. They always want to a slight V.
post #12 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by trailtrimmer View Post

Everything you listed short of the blizzard has a 10 or 11 DIN rated binding which is pushing it if you are 220 lbs.  12 would be the absolute lowest binder you should be looking at with a 14 or 16 DIN rating being more of the sweet spot.  

This may be a dumb question but you just mean the bindings should have a DIN rated that high, not what I actually have them set to right? I'll have to look when I get them back but I swear I have them set around 8-9 and they feel like they don't want to come off in a crash.
post #13 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis2001r6 View Post


This may be a dumb question but you just mean the bindings should have a DIN rated that high, not what I actually have them set to right? I'll have to look when I get them back but I swear I have them set around 8-9 and they feel like they don't want to come off in a crash.

I think so, it is consider that binding are better perform when skier din is in the middle. so for example 6-13, the optimal would be 8-10, that is why some people getting higher din bindings. like if you ski on din 10 or 11 you would probably want a 6-14 din binding or even 7-16. With your weight and ski level, I could just guess your din is around 8 or 9? so I guess binding up to 12 should be enough?

P.S. please test your binding for proper release... any shop should be able to do that for you.

post #14 of 27
Thread Starter 
So just a bit of an update here. My need for new skis is pretty much in my head. Think I had too much time off over the holidays and just needed to get back to work. Boredom makes me want to buy things.

But I got my skis tuned and hit up Cortina last weekend. Conditions were great in the morning and I had the most fun on skis in quite a while.

I do still get this choppy/skipping motion on my downhill leg through steep sections. We stuck with mostly red and blacks. I tried to work on my form a bit as I have a tendency to want to lean back. When I get my weight towards the front of my skis this helps a lot. Just need to work on technique a bit.

I haven't advanced much past up and down skiing as I call it. When I get going fast my skis are still flush with the snow and not carving on edge as I need to be.

In other news a friend of mine who's knew to skiing and only about 5'7" and 175lbs ordered himself a sent of 173cm Libtechs Tranny's. He wasn't handling them well so I traded my 159cm K2 Press twin tips. I think we'll both be happy with the trade but it also gives me something new to mess with.
post #15 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis2001r6 View Post

So just a bit of an update here. My need for new skis is pretty much in my head. Think I had too much time off over the holidays and just needed to get back to work. Boredom makes me want to buy things.
 

 

I expect you'll fit right in around here.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis2001r6 View Post


I do still get this choppy/skipping motion on my downhill leg through steep sections. We stuck with mostly red and blacks. I tried to work on my form a bit as I have a tendency to want to lean back. When I get my weight towards the front of my skis this helps a lot. Just need to work on technique a bit.
 

 

You'll want to have an instructor check your lateral balance as part of that work.   In the meantime, on a -very- easy slope, try traverses.   Lift the uphill ski off the snow.

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis2001r6 View Post

I haven't advanced much past up and down skiing as I call it. When I get going fast my skis are still flush with the snow and not carving on edge as I need to be.

Could you explain those two sentences more.  I have no idea what you mean by up and down skiing and what do you mean by flush with the snow.


Edited by mtcyclist - 1/23/16 at 8:32pm
post #17 of 27
Thread Starter 
Basically when I get going fast I'm flat on my skis. At a certain speed my tips start to get a bit wobbly. But from watching other fast people and reading on here I need my skis to be on edge and not flat.

When others are on edge they have some body lean as they go edge to edge where I'm still straight up and down with flat skis.
post #18 of 27
I want to try a red run (I think). Is that between blue and black?
post #19 of 27

post #20 of 27

I was guessing it was a European thing. I would ski in Europe. And Japan.

post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
I've only ski'd in Europe. I didn't even know it was a different scale. I mostly do reds here with the occasional black when the resorts have them. I like the challenge of blacks in the morning. But by afternoon if they are torn up I'd rather stick to the reds. Even if they aren't torn up the blacks take a lot out of my legs.
post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis2001r6 View Post

Basically when I get going fast I'm flat on my skis. At a certain speed my tips start to get a bit wobbly. But from watching other fast people and reading on here I need my skis to be on edge and not flat.

When others are on edge they have some body lean as they go edge to edge where I'm still straight up and down with flat skis.

So you just ski straight down the fall line, no turns?
post #23 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Davis2001r6 View Post

Basically when I get going fast I'm flat on my skis. At a certain speed my tips start to get a bit wobbly. But from watching other fast people and reading on here I need my skis to be on edge and not flat.

When others are on edge they have some body lean as they go edge to edge where I'm still straight up and down with flat skis.

So you just ski straight down the fall line, no turns?

 

fwiw, I read the 'up and down' part as windshield wiper turns with an up-unweight.

post #24 of 27

So, maybe some edging/carving lessons are in order?

post #25 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cheizz View Post
 


US doesn't have "Black" ski runs :dunno only black diamond or double black diamond or mix between blue square and black diamond, so European "Red" is -  US "Blue"  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piste

post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Oleg S View Post
 

I think so, it is consider that binding are better perform when skier din is in the middle. so for example 6-13, the optimal would be 8-10, that is why some people getting higher din bindings. like if you ski on din 10 or 11 you would probably want a 6-14 din binding or even 7-16. With your weight and ski level, I could just guess your din is around 8 or 9? so I guess binding up to 12 should be enough?

P.S. please test your binding for proper release... any shop should be able to do that for you.


I think the recommendation to get a binding with which your normal DIN setting is in the middle is mainly to give you options to change the DIN in either direction if something about you or your skiing changes. A binding that has a max DIN setting of 12 should "perform" exactly the same as the 12 DIN setting on a binding that goes up to 14 or 16, for example. Usually, bindings with higher DIN settings are made with heavier-duty materials and can therefore take more punishment than a lower DIN binding. But most people who are recreational skiing on groomers 80% of the time like the OP are not going to be people who are hard on bindings.

post #27 of 27
Salomon STH2 13 (din 5-13) and Salomon STH2 16 (din 6-16) are the same binding, made from PLASTIC (identically) the only differences: color and spring.
Look Pivot 12 and 14, on the other hand, are plastic, but 18 is metal.
For OP, no need to go with 16 (unless has extra money to burn and don't mind extra weight)
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