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Is this edge damage OK to DIY?

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Hey all,

 

These are pictures of one of my Rossi E88s. I was wondering if it is possible to judge how bad this is by the photos and if you think I can DIY it. I don't know when this happened; though, I think it happened recently because I just had them in the shop and I think they would [presumably] have noticed (or ground it flat anyway). I can feel the edge bulging out (downward) when I run my thumb down the base of the ski. 

 

I was thinking it could be fixed with epoxy and a clamp but I don't know. Does clamping it straighten it back usually? If I do use epoxy, how in the heck do I get the excess off of the edge and side? Its about 3 inches in front of the toe piece of the binding. I don't have any ski-specific tools on hand but probably won't use these skis until next weekend so I have time to purchase the needed items. Thanks in advance for the help!

 

(sorry, I can't figure out how to move this over to maintenance and repair.)

Moderator note: moved it for you.  To make a move request in the future, click on the Red Flag and write a note.  All Mods can see those notes.

 

 

post #2 of 16

Epoxy should work in there. You can clamp but remember you need a bond line so it will hold. Then just use a base bevel guide to bring that section of the base edge back into shape. 

post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

Epoxy should work in there. You can clamp but remember you need a bond line so it will hold. Then just use a base bevel guide to bring that section of the base edge back into shape. 

 

Awesome! thanks for the advice! If I don't have this bevel guide, it sounds like this is something I need. True? Also, what do you mean 'bond line'? Do you mean not to wipe off the excess before its dried? Maybe you mean take out some material from the damaged area to make sure I have good contact for the epoxy? Is there a good tool for this? It seems like a dremel cutting wheel (which I do have access to) is a bit aggressive. I also have the dremel wire wheel thingie. Something else? sorry for all the Q's, I tried to search re: bond line but couldn't really find anything specific to ski repair.  Thanks again!

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by HooDooThere View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

Epoxy should work in there. You can clamp but remember you need a bond line so it will hold. Then just use a base bevel guide to bring that section of the base edge back into shape. 

 

Awesome! thanks for the advice! If I don't have this bevel guide, it sounds like this is something I need. True? Also, what do you mean 'bond line'? Do you mean not to wipe off the excess before its dried? Maybe you mean take out some material from the damaged area to make sure I have good contact for the epoxy? Is there a good tool for this? It seems like a dremel cutting wheel (which I do have access to) is a bit aggressive. I also have the dremel wire wheel thingie. Something else? sorry for all the Q's, I tried to search re: bond line but couldn't really find anything specific to ski repair.  Thanks again!

 

He means 'significant length of edge for the epoxy to bond to'  or near enough.    You shouldn't have to /remove/ material for this to happen.     Can you open the damage just a little bit, using dental picks/what not ?  While you squirt the epoxy in with a syringe and then clamp everything shut?    

 

Removing material is bad because whatever you remove you have to replace - with like a thickened epoxy or something - and that's just making more work for yourself.   If you don't replace it, it will be a weak spot and compress down almost instantly you put pressure on that section of edge.

post #5 of 16

"Bond line" is a new on me too. You want to remove any loose material with something like a dental but other than that you shouldn't need to ground out any material. You'll need clamps and a bevel guide at least. You'll want to make sure that the base is flat before setting the base edge--if there is any bulge that  will need to be ground flat. You might want to check on the cost of having a shop do the repair before investing in tools. Getting things glued up securely isn't the hard part--getting the base flat and the edge straight is.

post #6 of 16

Bond line = there must be a thin bead of bonding material, that is the bond line. At work we'll use .008" glass beads so we have enough of a bond line.

 

If you clamp it to tightly, you'll squeeze out the epoxy.

post #7 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

Bond line = there must be a thin bead of bonding material, that is the bond line. At work we'll use .008" glass beads so we have enough of a bond line.

 

If you clamp it to tightly, you'll squeeze out the epoxy.

what kind of work are you talking about? Ski repair or something more complicated? In my very limited experience repairing ski delams and my much more extensive experience gluing up wood it's hard to starve a glue joint, although it certainly can be done. 

post #8 of 16

We assemble hardware for NASA. Think Space Suit and hardware used on the Space Station as well as Navy Sub's.

 

One of the epoxy's we use is called Scotchweld. 

post #9 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

We assemble hardware for NASA. Think Space Suit and hardware used on the Space Station as well as Navy Sub's.

 

One of the epoxy's we use is called Scotchweld. 

 

Well, I won't be sending it that high or riding [these] in pow that deep but...

 

thanks to everyone who responded. It looks like I can probably do the "repair" part but not the "tune" part without the right tools or knowledge. I didn't mention that these are my 'daily driver' skis (my only others being full rocker soft-condition skis). I guess I was thinking that I could clamp them back in to tune but that seems unlikely and one wouldn't even know if that was the case without the correct tools.

 

I think I'm going to take them to the shop like oldgoat said. I really want to learn how to tune up and work on my own stuff but I need the tools and the knowledge base; mid-season DIY work on my most oft used skis may not be the wise idea considering I have an old pair I can practice on and I want these for this weekend. If the shop's price is way high or they say they can't do it, I'll follow up here. 

 

I also noticed nobody said not to worry about it, so it looks like it needs to be fixed and fixed right. 

 

Thanks again!

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

We assemble hardware for NASA. Think Space Suit and hardware used on the Space Station as well as Navy Sub's.

 

One of the epoxy's we use is called Scotchweld. 

not gluelines you'd want to have fail

post #11 of 16

Keep that ski on whatever foot puts that edge outside and not inside.

post #12 of 16

Yes, needs to be fixed, you don't want water getting in there.

post #13 of 16
Thread Starter 

Thanks again for the advice all. I took it to the shop and they said they should be able to do it and it'll cost me 10.00 dollars plus 5.00 for a hot wax. Based on that, I left the skis there for them to do the work. He said he thinks I stabbed it with a pole to cause that type of damage. I hadn't thought of that. 

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by crgildart View Post
 

Keep that ski on whatever foot puts that edge outside and not inside.

good advice--and that's after repair.

 

$10 for that repair--a lot less than I would have thought. 

post #15 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

good advice--and that's after repair.

 

$10 for that repair--a lot less than I would have thought. 


So, in trying to follow this advice I attempted to locate the repair. I didn't find it but I took the skis home from the shop.

 

Found it this morning and it's not quite totally flat, I'm kind of worried because, as stated to me earlier in the thread:

Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

You'll want to make sure that the base is flat before setting the base edge--if there is any bulge that  will need to be ground flat. You might want to check on the cost of having a shop do the repair before investing in tools. Getting things glued up securely isn't the hard part--getting the base flat and the edge straight is.

 

 

when I dropped the skis off, the guy said he didn't want to just seal and grind it because the bases are thin. I guess the real question is do I just ski on it, or have them grind it down first and ski on it? Some other option? Hmmmm....I was kind of hoping for it to be flatter. It was hard to get a good picture:

 

EDIT: The guys at the shop said to just ski them when I took them over to them during lunch; he said it was just about as good as it could get. fair enough.

 

 


^^^ I don't think its quite as bad as this is making it look....(its a pretty flexible bondo scraper, not for skis) but the edge is not flat...

 

Here's one, it harder to see, but you notice just a bit of daylight on either side of the scraper:

 

 

 

Thanks in advance! (Sorry for all the ninja edits.)


Edited by HooDooThere - 1/22/16 at 1:11pm
post #16 of 16

Sorry for thread hijack.:o

 

I have a worse blown edge problem than HooDooThere and wonder if it is DIY repairable?

 

Edge got ripped out on a rock at A-Basin last March, about three feet got separated from ski, worse section is about 1/4 inch out.  Over the summer I used a long squirt of gorilla glue on the blown edge and then repaired base damage with epoxy and ptex.  It wasn't the best job and I'm not good at this stuff.  It held for two ski days then blew out last Friday pretty much same as before.  I've had these Nordica Burner skis for three seasons and got about 55 days on them until now.  Liked them, but not willing to have shop do $100+ repair job.  Thanks for any advice.

 

Another angle.

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