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Weight shift realization! [A Beginner Zone thread] - Page 2

post #31 of 36

BUMP for beginners looking forward to 2016-17.  The OP (Opening Poster) was in her second season on skis when she started this Beginner Zone thread.

 

Moderator Note: the Beginner Zone is monitored more carefully to keep discussions on topic.

post #32 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenTomato View Post

Agreed, the boot fitting process is very valuable and must be done to be truly happy. Also the input of a professional who has experience with many brands and styles of boots and the various types of feet and myriad of possible issues, helped me considerably.

Today finally got some time to go out to the local hill mount St. Louis moonstone today. Wow, such a difference, I easily made it down every run, and was looking for more challenge. Had a great time feeling in control and going faster than I ever felt comfortable in the past. Snow Trace told me I was getting sustained speeds of over 50kmph on most runs, and a peak speed of over 70kmph, speeds that would have terrified me in the past. I finally feel I am truly beyond beginner!

Thanks everyone, for your help and encouragement. The boot fitting process and getting the skis tunes was essential to this process. I will continue on attempting to improve and hopefully eventually master this fine sport. Huge journey has been had as a person who always afraid of any height over about 12', and never thought I would do something so crazy as to strap planks to my feet and slide down a steep slope! Really feeling triumphant and waiting for the next challenge. As such I will focus on technique, as that is the only challenge to be had. Again huge thank you to everyone who took a second to encourage and help your support has been much appreciated and useful in developing. biggrin.gif

GreenTomato,
I like my boots tight. Sometimes I can get along with them loose, sometimes not. I read some of your issues with cold feet and pain. One thing I do that makes a HUGE difference is that I pop up the buckles for the lift ride up. I leave the clips in place, so it's real quick. Pop them up while waiting for the chair, push them back down after I get off the chair.

I also read some of your posts where some days aren't so good. The thing about skiing is that there are many different types of conditions. Just when you think you have it mastered comes a new condition you've never seen, and you have to learn all over again. Some people get really snobby about conditions, but I like to look for the challenge. Some techniques will work in some conditions but not in others, and the sensations can be very different. For me, there's no better feeling than moguls. Here's a run of mine where I need tight boots.

https://youtu.be/00UxOo0RAXo
post #33 of 36
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by The Engineer View Post


GreenTomato,
I like my boots tight. Sometimes I can get along with them loose, sometimes not. I read some of your issues with cold feet and pain. One thing I do that makes a HUGE difference is that I pop up the buckles for the lift ride up. I leave the clips in place, so it's real quick. Pop them up while waiting for the chair, push them back down after I get off the chair.

I also read some of your posts where some days aren't so good. The thing about skiing is that there are many different types of conditions. Just when you think you have it mastered comes a new condition you've never seen, and you have to learn all over again. Some people get really snobby about conditions, but I like to look for the challenge. Some techniques will work in some conditions but not in others, and the sensations can be very different. For me, there's no better feeling than moguls. Here's a run of mine where I need tight boots.

https://youtu.be/00UxOo0RAXo


Thanks for the thoughts regarding the cold feet and unbuckling for the lift ride. Ive sometimes done that in the past, but I also suffer from cold hands, and usually Im too much of a baby to un-glove often. Strangely I have found I notice my cold feet the most when I am on the lift (possibly wind related), boot gloves seems to help a lot although super annoying to put on. Hotronics or sidas will probably be installed this season when I make it a priority. 

 

I should probably update anyone who is interested. This is now my third season. Ive been out 5 times so far this year.

 

Tangentially last year I overworked myself (workaholic taking my business to the next level), and have suffered some kind of insane burnout. Very Low energy. I can only do a couple hours of ski time twice a week maximum. Since my practice time is limited I am trying to make the most of it. 

 

Ive been reading many books and watching videos on youtube. Found myself re-watching Lito's Breakthrough on Skis 3. And found his discussion the weight shift realization at length. He and I both having the same realization (shift your weight and the skis turn themselves), has spurred me on to work on the drills he suggests in all his films. I do the early weight sift skill naturally. Working on commitment for every turn, which is sometimes hard when the hill gets steep. But notice my upper and lower body separation is lacking. Also working on the "phantom move". 

 

continually working on keeping my body downhill, and ankles closed. I have noticed Those habits help a lot. Although I have found I feel like I am flexing the ankle and "holding on for dear life" almost feels like I cannot flex the joint enough, to "hang on" to the boot with my ankle. Ive also been having an issue with a wandering ski on my right foot. 

 

I feel as though I am still having boot issues. I have some space on the top on my foot due to a very low instep and a narrow foot. I got a cardboard spacer to lift up the foot in the liner, which moves the foot up and takes up the space on the top of the foot. Ill see if that helps on my next outing. 

 

My final observation to note is I'm having trouble edging my ski left ski. Ski doesn't seem to bite into our hardback as well as i would like, slips out easily. I will get a tune up and see if that helps. 

 

I am inquiring with various private instructors in the area to do a weekly lesson. When I get some energy back Ill do a camp or some kind of intensive. 

post #34 of 36
Quote:
Originally Posted by GreenTomato View Post


Thanks for the thoughts regarding the cold feet and unbuckling for the lift ride. Ive sometimes done that in the past, but I also suffer from cold hands, and usually Im too much of a baby to un-glove often. Strangely I have found I notice my cold feet the most when I am on the lift (possibly wind related), boot gloves seems to help a lot although super annoying to put on. Hotronics or sidas will probably be installed this season when I make it a priority. 

I should probably update anyone who is interested. This is now my third season. Ive been out 5 times so far this year.

Tangentially last year I overworked myself (workaholic taking my business to the next level), and have suffered some kind of insane burnout. Very Low energy. I can only do a couple hours of ski time twice a week maximum. Since my practice time is limited I am trying to make the most of it. 

Ive been reading many books and watching videos on youtube. Found myself re-watching Lito's Breakthrough on Skis 3. And found his discussion the weight shift realization at length. He and I both having the same realization (shift your weight and the skis turn themselves), has spurred me on to work on the drills he suggests in all his films. I do the early weight sift skill naturally. Working on commitment for every turn, which is sometimes hard when the hill gets steep. But notice my upper and lower body separation is lacking. Also working on the "phantom move". 

continually working on keeping my body downhill, and ankles closed. I have noticed Those habits help a lot. Although I have found I feel like I am flexing the ankle and "holding on for dear life" almost feels like I cannot flex the joint enough, to "hang on" to the boot with my ankle. Ive also been having an issue with a wandering ski on my right foot. 

I feel as though I am still having boot issues. I have some space on the top on my foot due to a very low instep and a narrow foot. I got a cardboard spacer to lift up the foot in the liner, which moves the foot up and takes up the space on the top of the foot. Ill see if that helps on my next outing. 

My final observation to note is I'm having trouble edging my ski left ski. Ski doesn't seem to bite into our hardback as well as i would like, slips out easily. I will get a tune up and see if that helps. 

I am inquiring with various private instructors in the area to do a weekly lesson. When I get some energy back Ill do a camp or some kind of intensive. 

Sounds like you're on top of things. I get cold hands too. I don't take off my gloves to loosen and unloosen the buckles. Even with mittens I can just pull up on that buckle lever and just push down on that lever. It takes about 3s for me to do it. I couldn't get through a day without it. Also my boots seem to have gotten tighter over the years instead of packing out.
post #35 of 36

@GreenTomato, I hope you can hook up with an instructor because several of the things you are describing are classic stance issues, weight back and/or not over the outside ski. An instructor should be able to adjust that in a couple of hours.

 

Now for your cold hands and feet. I've just been reading where women typically have 3 degrees colder hands and feet than men. Also, it's genetic for the body to reduce blood flow to the extremities when it feels the core temperature dropping. A women's body is trying to protect it's unborn so it will sacrifice a finger or toe!

Try wearing an extra core layer over your normal layers, maybe a down vest. Keeping the core warm will allow extra blood flow to the hands and feet. It may not stop your hands and feet from getting cold but it may take longer and you should recover faster. My daughter gets cold hands and feet at 30F.

 

For on line instruction videos I prefer Jonathan Ballou and JF Beaulieu, here are two great examples.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fmTgow0H_hs

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_XuGWW6vcQ

post #36 of 36

Ballou is good.  Ballou's drill would be even better if the skier tipped the raised ski so its outside edge was on the snow and the inside edge was raised.  Beaulieu is terrible.  He tells you what to do but not how to do it.  Then he does something else.  He tells you to steer, then he edges his ski and the ski turns him, he doesn't steer it (which is good if he knew the difference).  He's a tremendous athlete and skis very well despite his apparent lack of knowledge.

 

For cold hands and feet, get electrically heated boot insoles and heated gloves or mittens.  Ordinary mittens with very thick insulation are good, used with heat packs on the backs of the hands are better, and electric ones are best.  I think the batteries last a half day, so buy extras.  Last week at Whistler the temp was in single digits F, and one of our group needed neoprene boot covers over her boots with electric heated insoles.  That worked for her.  The neoprene boot covers (Boot Glove is one brand; SureFoot has some, there are others) are a big help but not as good as Hotronics.

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