or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › ski boots make my feet hurt.
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

ski boots make my feet hurt.

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

I just got them adjusted, because before they hurt all the time within 10 minutes. I'm wearing them in the house right now. Right foot feels fine (toes are a bit numb). I want to gnaw my left foot off. My left foot has sciatica and the ski boot seems to be irritating it.

Is there ANYTHING I can do for this other than just put up with it?

post #2 of 23

Snowboard.

post #3 of 23
Thicker socks? If you stand up straight, do your toes hit the front of your boots?
post #4 of 23
Hurt where? Are there hot spots? Circulation is cut off, so it's like one big ache? Are they new? What kind of work/adjusting did the shop do?
post #5 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by aromachief View Post

Right foot feels fine (toes are a bit numb). I want to gnaw my left foot off. My left foot has sciatica and the ski boot seems to be irritating it.
Numb toes feel fine????? That is not how they should feel. "Boots make my feet hurt" is not a helpful description. I had a customer get irritated with me because I told him "these boots are killing me" didn't convey any useful information. I'll take a wild guess that the problem in the left boot is caused by improper arch support. You need to find a skilled boot fitter, not just someone in a store that happens to sell ski boots.
post #6 of 23
Thread Starter 

Yeah, that was the conclusion we've also come to. We talked to a ski instructor friend who was very disappointed that their fit consisted of having me try the boots on and walk around the store a little. We went to another shop. It turns out they're a half size too BIG and too small/improper arch support in the front of the foot. Unfortunately now that they're adjusted we probably can't return them :/

Oh well. To the shop with the actual fitting certification I suppose :(

post #7 of 23
Normally a shop should stand behind their fit. I'd try taking them back. Make sure they/you do a shell fit the next time. Ask for the manager and tell them that wasn't done so you ended up with the wrong size boot. Can't hurt.
post #8 of 23
(There is no such thing as a half size in a ski boot).
post #9 of 23
Thread Starter 

I don't know anything about ski boots lol. I'm just going off the fact that they definitely do not fit like they should and have been advised by someone who DOES know what they're doing to return them or get something else. I was told about shell fitting...that was not done. Looking at the shop reviews lots of other people have had this problem.

Tbh this entire experience has been fairly frustrating :( I'm determined to like skiing (I was okay at it even the first time out!) but it's hard when it hurts/I have to keep swapping equipment. I figure the best thing is to take advice from people who are more experienced than I.

post #10 of 23

It's only frustrating because you went the wrong way.  

Unfortunately, many newcomers get steered the wrong way, just as if you rent a car for the first time, you'd be saying yes to extra insurance and other things.

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Whiteroom View Post

(There is no such thing as a half size in a ski boot).


I came here to post this.  Also, don't get discouraged. 

 

My first new pair of boots was a 27.5.  I bought them because I wanted red boots. 

Gathering a little information, my next pair was a 26.5, and I bought them because the flex was right. 

Third pair was a 25.5 in the proper flex, and custom footbeds.

Fourth, still 25.5, good flex, better volume, custom liners and footbeds.

Fifth, still 25.5, good flex, proper volume, custom liners.  Current boots.  Awesome.

 

I grew and learned.  I made mistakes, but now I have a better understanding of how boots fit, and what I need out of a boot.

post #12 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post
 


I came here to post this.  Also, don't get discouraged.

 

My first new pair of boots was a 27.5.  I bought them because I wanted red boots.

Gathering a little information, my next pair was a 26.5, and I bought them because the flex was right.

Third pair was a 25.5 in the proper flex, and custom footbeds.

Fourth, still 25.5, good flex, better volume, custom liners and footbeds.

Fifth, still 25.5, good flex, proper volume, custom liners.  Current boots.  Awesome.

 

I grew and learned.  I made mistakes, but now I have a better understanding of how boots fit, and what I need out of a boot.

I had a similar experience. My first (rookie) pair were 27.5 Kastingers = pain :(. Must have been like 120 flex and too big. Got shin bang all of the time. Next pair (intermediate) were 26.5 Rossi 900's = sweet :). Worked great until I improved. Went through a few manufacturers before settling on Atomic's shell width.

Now I'm skiing a 26.5 Atomic GS10 Race with booster straps, custom foot beds and Intuition liners = plush :D.

 

Shells have all changed since I bought the Atomics so it should be an adventure to find the next pair.

post #13 of 23

Unfortunately this is a common problem with new people to the sport buying ski boots.  The boot is too big, causes arch pain and they end up over tightening the boot.  Not all boot fitters know what they are doing and often you never even get multiple boots to try on.  Even if they do a shell fit, doesn't mean they will do it right.  

post #14 of 23

There are people in the ski biz that will tell you that the difference between half sizes in ski boots is in the thickness of the liner or footbed. They are mistaken.

 

So if the shop doesn't do a shell fit or thinks there are differences between half sizes, they are red flags that mean buy elsewhere.

post #15 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

There are people in the ski biz that will tell you that the difference between half sizes in ski boots is in the thickness of the liner or footbed. They are mistaken.

So if the shop doesn't do a shell fit or thinks there are differences between half sizes, they are red flags that mean buy elsewhere.

Absolutely.
post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by Caucasian Asian View Post
 

My first new pair of boots was a 27.5.  I bought them because I wanted red boots. 

 

Heehee..  :)  Hey, it happens!

post #17 of 23

It's a problem with skates as well.  Unfortunately, there is a point where the bootfitter can't pick and you have to decide.  It's not easy, boots on, boots off, walk around..  I do know that it can be done.  For instance, I figured out after a long time that if the Bauer measurement device says you need a 8.5EE, you need an 8.5EE, not a 9D that they happen to have in stock.  Or because they asked what your shoe size is and subtracted 1.  Even still, there is a point where it comes down to the user and they have to make the final decision.  I think good bootfitters will fit the hardest part to fix in relation to your foot, say the arch height and instep volume, and then punch out the toe/forefoot area if need be.  But that takes a good bootfitter and time.  If you have non-standard feet (I don't even know what a standard foot is..), it unfortunately will involve trial and error.

post #18 of 23

I bought my first pair of plastic boots in the early '70s because they were on sale. They were too big and I knew it because I could get heel lift in the store. The store owner suggested wearing a second pair of socks with the front half cut off and the back half sewn to my ski sock, thus creating extra thick padding at my heel. I bought the boots.

 

Of course the control difference between skiing in plastic boots and leather boots was so dramatic that a bit of heel lift didn't even matter.;)

post #19 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by aromachief View Post
 

Yeah, that was the conclusion we've also come to. We talked to a ski instructor friend who was very disappointed that their fit consisted of having me try the boots on and walk around the store a little. We went to another shop. It turns out they're a half size too BIG and too small/improper arch support in the front of the foot. Unfortunately now that they're adjusted we probably can't return them :/

Oh well. To the shop with the actual fitting certification I suppose :(

 

I thought that was it.  When it just hurts all over, or is numb, it's usually too tight.  That is common if you just try it on and walk around the store.  If you want to ski more than a few days a year, you really need to go to a reputable bootfitter and get properly fitted.  It is the single best purchase you will ever make skiing.  Don't let that discourage you though, live and learn!

post #20 of 23
Unlike some of the others here, I am not able to assess your needs without seeing you. Based on my modest experience, I would tell you this in general:

The overwhelming cause of intolerable ski boot pain is a lack of dorsiflexion. The overwhelming cause of bad skiing and intolerable ski boot pain is an inability to stand at the angle that the ski boot is dictating, which is typically around 10 degrees of dorsiflexion.

A competent boot fitter, physical therapist, or similarly skilled professional can evaluate this easily. It is not how far you can lift the ball of your foot of the ground, as this does not eliminate compensatory movement.

It is most commonly caused by an excessively tight calf or hamstring muscles.

Our voicemail and email get this story on a daily basis. It almost always has the same underlying cause.

Despite the fact that I am kind of busy actually doing this stuff I do have to respond to this:
Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

There are people in the ski biz that will tell you that the difference between half sizes in ski boots is in the thickness of the liner or footbed. They are mistaken.

So if the shop doesn't do a shell fit or thinks there are differences between half sizes, they are red flags that mean buy elsewhere.

Despite the fact that you just said 2 contradictory things, apparently either the boxes or the boots are being mislabeled as this has not been my experience.

I suppose this makes me and Whiteroom wrong as well, as I routinely tell our clients that the half aize is a myth. It would also seem that Lange/Rossignol has missed the boat since they have dispensed with the pretense completely and and have been only offering the .5 variant for a couple of years now.

If I felt it was important, I would probably purchase inventory based on half sizes. But, we don't and it seems to going okay.

The shell fit does have a place, primarily when the skier is between sizes or when checking for width, it is not always necessary if you have done all the other measurements and are familiar with your inventory.

Not being dismissive of it, but you don't have to do it every time if you already know what it will show.

jl
post #21 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BOOTech,Inc. View Post

Unlike some of the others here, I am not able to assess your needs without seeing you. Based on my modest experience, and oooow, I just can't keep the passive aggressive humble thing under control, since I know more than god himself about boots, so here goes...;)

 

OP: Post in the Boot Forum. 

post #22 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by BOOTech,Inc. View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by DanoT View Post

There are people in the ski biz that will tell you that the difference between half sizes in ski boots is in the thickness of the liner or footbed. They are mistaken.

So if the shop doesn't do a shell fit or thinks there are differences between half sizes, they are red flags that mean buy elsewhere.

Despite the fact that you just said 2 contradictory things, apparently either the boxes or the boots are being mislabeled as this has not been my experience.

I suppose this makes me and Whiteroom wrong as well, as I routinely tell our clients that the half aize is a myth. It would also seem that Lange/Rossignol has missed the boat since they have dispensed with the pretense completely and and have been only offering the .5 variant for a couple of years now.

If I felt it was important, I would probably purchase inventory based on half sizes. But, we don't and it seems to going okay.

The shell fit does have a place, primarily when the skier is between sizes or when checking for width, it is not always necessary if you have done all the other measurements and are familiar with your inventory.

Not being dismissive of it, but you don't have to do it every time if you already know what it will show.

jl

I read DanoT's post as saying what you are saying, i.e., that half sizes don't exist. I think you misread his post.
post #23 of 23
For the record, I didn't intend to be passive/aggressive, I had aimed for mildly witty with a dash of sarcasm/condescension. It would appear I overshot the mark and do apologize for seeming arrogant.
My actual intent was to point out that so many of the common ski boot complaints often share the same underlying cause. And that " I can't wear ski boots "
almost always stems from the same cause. If you have the same problem in every ski boot it likely has the same underlying cause..

I will do my best to avoid ill considered, late night tirades in the future.

Thank you for your consideration.

jl
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › ski boots make my feet hurt.