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Frostbite

post #1 of 21
Thread Starter 
How do you no when someone has frostbite
post #2 of 21
You'll know. The first time I saw it, I knew in a glance. The skin looks all dead and sort of grey/white if you're lucky. Can be black/purple if it's worse. Just Google "frostbite", images. Make sure you're done with dinner.
post #3 of 21

It starts with shiny skin and whit spots.  If you see it then and take action you will save yourself a lot of pain.  As for toes, well you won't know for sure until you take your boots off and let them thaw out.  Google has plenty of images.

post #4 of 21

When you or your friend freezes their asses off,

post #5 of 21
Thread Starter 
Thx I see white dots I will get on it!
post #6 of 21

I got frost nip in my toes a while back.  Sort of starter-frostbite.  Your feet feel cold then they don't.  When they stop feeling cold and you have no reason to believe they've warmed up, you are starting down that road.  I knew immediately when I went in the hot tub at the end of the day.  My feet were burning terribly..very painful.  They now have sensitive spots to cold so my message would be, be aware of the temps and your body..don't get it, be sensible.  You'll live with it for a long time I think.

post #7 of 21


My experience was in blizzard conditions. Snow built up on the edge of my balaclava on my face. On of my ski buddies saw it and warned me. I cleared it off right away and we kept going. When I got in I looked at the spot and saw that it had frozen. I had a white strip at my cheek bone that ended up being like a bad strip of sunburn. It dried up, flaked off, then healed in a few weeks. Different deal than frozen toes.

post #8 of 21
I had lines running from my nose to the corners of my mouth for some reason. Didn't know a thing until I was driving home and this horrible burning started. All the skin peeled off. Just a light case, but the fact I had no clue was scary.
post #9 of 21

I think it depend of the people... I don't know in advance; I'm guessing that I could have some and then, a couple of hours after, I see the black spot...

post #10 of 21

The first sign will be numbness. If your fingers, toes, or the exposed skin on your face is numb you need to rewarm immediately. If you do you will likely avoid any damage, either short or long term. The next sign will be grayish white skin. At this point, even if you thaw you have a good chance of permanent damage. If the part feels like wood you will definitely have permanent injury. If your feet are frozen solid don't thaw them until you know you have mechanized evacuation or until you are back in civilization. You can walk out oon frozen feet but not thawed feet. Black won't show up for days, and not until after the part has been thawed. For early changes at a resort going inside and loosening or removing boots is all you need to do. For more information see "Annapurna" by Maurice Herzog (including vivid descriptions of toe amputations being carried out in a box car.)

post #11 of 21

Last monday I had frostbite on the temples... I had to think really really hard to find out how come I had frotbites there but not on my face... I've fond part of the answer: glasses... I usually put the branches of my glasses under my hood but I finally realized that by doing so, I pulled the hood away from my skin and exposed my temples to the cold...

Test it with branches over the hood the next day ( even colder temperature!) and it worked!

post #12 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

The first sign will be numbness. If your fingers, toes, or the exposed skin on your face is numb you need to rewarm immediately. If you do you will likely avoid any damage, either short or long term. The next sign will be grayish white skin. At this point, even if you thaw you have a good chance of permanent damage. If the part feels like wood you will definitely have permanent injury. If your feet are frozen solid don't thaw them until you know you have mechanized evacuation or until you are back in civilization. You can walk out oon frozen feet but not thawed feet. Black won't show up for days, and not until after the part has been thawed. For early changes at a resort going inside and loosening or removing boots is all you need to do. For more information see "Annapurna" by Maurice Herzog (including vivid descriptions of toe amputations being carried out in a box car.)

 

 

All true, but if you suffer from Renauld's Syndrome (I do - mild/moderate) it looks the same but isn't quite so serious; easily warmed up with no damage or residual sensitivity (other than the Reynauld's, of course!).  Almost works as a reliable early warning system!

post #13 of 21

I will never forget when I was skiing Mount Tremblaunt  and as I came into a stop a ski patrol told me I was getting frostbite. I said I don't feel a thing! Very stupid of me, I went in and I could see a gray tinge to my face. I did not have a further problem but a few of my friends came back with issues on their face. Thanks for the patrol.

post #14 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Lutes View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

The first sign will be numbness. If your fingers, toes, or the exposed skin on your face is numb you need to rewarm immediately. If you do you will likely avoid any damage, either short or long term. The next sign will be grayish white skin. At this point, even if you thaw you have a good chance of permanent damage. If the part feels like wood you will definitely have permanent injury. If your feet are frozen solid don't thaw them until you know you have mechanized evacuation or until you are back in civilization. You can walk out oon frozen feet but not thawed feet. Black won't show up for days, and not until after the part has been thawed. For early changes at a resort going inside and loosening or removing boots is all you need to do. For more information see "Annapurna" by Maurice Herzog (including vivid descriptions of toe amputations being carried out in a box car.)

 

 

All true, but if you suffer from Renauld's Syndrome (I do - mild/moderate) it looks the same but isn't quite so serious; easily warmed up with no damage or residual sensitivity (other than the Reynauld's, of course!).  Almost works as a reliable early warning system!

People with Raynaud's are much more susceptible to frost bite than other people, due to the restricted circulation, so people with the disorder still need to take the whiteness and numbness seriously and rewarm. It's not common but I have seen a few people with finger ulcerations due to Raynaud's with no unusual exposure to freezing temperatures--just household exposure in Sacramento in the winter.

post #15 of 21

Wow!!  Make mine very mild then.  But still, the whiteness and numbness that I get is an obvious indication that damage is imminent but easily avoided - seems like common sense to me.

post #16 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by Paul Lutes View Post
 

Wow!!  Make mine very mild then.  But still, the whiteness and numbness that I get is an obvious indication that damage is imminent but easily avoided - seems like common sense to me.

Common sense seems to be uncommon when the powder is deep.:)

post #17 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by H2OnSnow View Post
 


My experience was in blizzard conditions. Snow built up on the edge of my balaclava on my face. On of my ski buddies saw it and warned me. I cleared it off right away and we kept going. When I got in I looked at the spot and saw that it had frozen. I had a white strip at my cheek bone that ended up being like a bad strip of sunburn. It dried up, flaked off, then healed in a few weeks. Different deal than frozen toes.

This...I was actually showshoing up a windy ridge, with blowing snow constantly pelting me from the left. I thought my face was fully covered, but I had a small strip exposed along the cheekbone, apparently. I was kind of shiny, painful, and looked like a bad sunburn at the end of the day. Within a few days it turned a nasty shade of grey, and a few days later by friend poked it, and it sloughed off. Then it looked like a bad blister had just popped on my face.

 

Luckily, it healed well and with no scarring, but it could have been a lot worse. I learned to be a lot more careful with face coverage. 


Edited by LiveJazz - 1/11/16 at 12:51pm
post #18 of 21

I think something else to remember is that the more times you get frostnip/bite the easier it is for that to happen on subsequent occasions.

post #19 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by soporific View Post
 

I think something else to remember is that the more times you get frostnip/bite the easier it is for that to happen on subsequent occasions.

I used to have an interesting collection of post frostbite patients I would see every winter who would develop ulcers or small areas of gangrene on previously frostbitten digits--and this was in Sacramento, above freezing temps. One guy had been frostbitten at the Battle of the Bulge, one at Chosin Reservoir. one--an Indian-- had been frostbitten fighting the Chinese in the Himalaya in 1962, one had been a lineman in the Sierra, and one had worked in a meat locker. Also a guy who had similar symptoms who had never been frostbitten--his feet were damaged on the Bataan Death March. I always found it a fascinating privilege to talk to these guys (maybe not the meat locker guy so much) about their experiences--the people after them on my schedule probably had to wait longer than they should have.

 

(I also had to operate on a guy who claimed to have been sunk in the Pacific in WWII and was the only survuvor--the rest of his crewmates having been eaten by sharks, then wounded so badly in Korea that he was zipped up in a body bag, then as a civilian policeman shot in the badge which saved his life, then survived serving on a gunboat on the Mekong River without injury, and finally survived a ruptured abdominal aneurysm [that one I know to be true]. I figured I would be a hell of an incompetent surgeon if I managed to kill him, but I didn't.)

post #20 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

 

(I also had to operate on a guy who claimed to have been sunk in the Pacific in WWII and was the only survuvor--the rest of his crewmates having been eaten by sharks, then wounded so badly in Korea that he was zipped up in a body bag, then as a civilian policeman shot in the badge which saved his life, then survived serving on a gunboat on the Mekong River without injury, and finally survived a ruptured abdominal aneurysm [that one I know to be true]. I figured I would be a hell of an incompetent surgeon if I managed to kill him, but I didn't.)

Sort of reminds me of this story: 

 

post #21 of 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post

I used to have an interesting collection of post frostbite patients I would see every winter who would develop ulcers or small areas of gangrene on previously frostbitten digits--and this was in Sacramento, above freezing temps. One guy had been frostbitten at the Battle of the Bulge, one at Chosin Reservoir. one--an Indian-- had been frostbitten fighting the Chinese in the Himalaya in 1962, one had been a lineman in the Sierra, and one had worked in a meat locker. Also a guy who had similar symptoms who had never been frostbitten--his feet were damaged on the Bataan Death March. I always found it a fascinating privilege to talk to these guys (maybe not the meat locker guy so much) about their experiences--the people after them on my schedule probably had to wait longer than they should have.

(I also had to operate on a guy who claimed to have been sunk in the Pacific in WWII and was the only survuvor--the rest of his crewmates having been eaten by sharks, then wounded so badly in Korea that he was zipped up in a body bag, then as a civilian policeman shot in the badge which saved his life, then survived serving on a gunboat on the Mekong River without injury, and finally survived a ruptured abdominal aneurysm [that one I know to be true]. I figured I would be a hell of an incompetent surgeon if I managed to kill him, but I didn't.)

I imagine those guys have very colorful histories which could fill a set of encyclopedias. One guy in Band of Brothers talks about Bastogne being the coldest he ever was in his life. A documentary called the Chosin Few has footage and testimony describing the bitter cold these guys went through, you almost feel cold hearing about it. I can only relate in that I was young and got a mild case on my feet, and a few years later did something to where my feet had numb spots for years. Luckily I haven't had any noticeable cold problems in my feet now that I'm 41, but losing a few toes would probably seriously impact any skiers life.
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