or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Does weight matter when downhill skiing?
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Does weight matter when downhill skiing?

post #1 of 13
Thread Starter 

I'm going skiing in a few weeks and have lost some weight since I went this time last year. Last year I weighed around 54kg (about 120 pounds) and now I'm like 43kg (95 pounds). Will I find a difference in skiing at a lower weight?

post #2 of 13

You will notice difference, especially with such a drastic change (over 20%).  

There are some issues related to physics and overall weight and what skis you are on and such;but those factors can be equalized, as small kids can ski similarly to adults with smaller equipment changes.

 

 

With such a drastic change, the biggest difference for a particular individual though, is if your weight loss included muscle loss or gain.  How strong are you proportional to your weight.   Are you the same strength or perhaps stronger even though you lost weight?

 

Did you get rid of 11 kg of excess weight only by diet, or did you also exercise and improve your athletic ability, especially your leg and/or cardio. You can setup pure metrics based on your body to determine if you are better or worse.  

For example, can you run a mile easier or faster than you did a year ago?  Can you ride a bike easier or faster then you did a year ago.   Can you climb 10flights of stairs easier or faster than a year ago?

post #3 of 13
Thread Starter 

It was lost in the beginning through a lot of running along with severe diet changes but I stopped doing cardio last summer so I definitely have lost a lot of muscle. Would that make it more difficult do you think?

post #4 of 13

Generally speaking with that weight loss you will probably notice a lower top speed, and find your skis a little harder to bend into a beautifully carved tight turn.

post #5 of 13

The proof is in the stats and metrics against your own body weight.  
 

Like if I recall as part of Vail's ski instructor test requirement, they say in your ski boots, have to do step up/step down onto a step with a cadence of every second for 5minutes.   They don't say you have to weigh a particular weight to be a good skier/ski instructor, you just have to accomplish the task.  

So try that test or something else like lunges or climbing up stairs or squats, or pure running or going to a fitness/aerobics class and seeing if you can make it through that class (e.g. not necessarily weights, but situps, burpees, jumping jacks, high knees, etc)

 

You will have to track those activities yourself to see if they are easier or harder for you.  

post #6 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Generally speaking with that weight loss you will probably notice a lower top speed, and find your skis a little harder to bend into a beautifully carved tight turn.


Like Ghost stated, maybe gravity will not make you go as fast and perhaps your endurance will be down, but don't worry about it.  Go have fun, eat well, drink lots of water and pop a vitamin M (motrin) as needed.
 

post #7 of 13

If you like bump skiing, it will be easier on your knees :)

post #8 of 13

What's your DIN setting and what type skier are you ?

 

Do you plan on skiing more aggressive ?

post #9 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

Generally speaking with that weight loss you will probably notice a lower top speed, and find your skis a little harder to bend into a beautifully carved tight turn.


Yes.  The skis respond to the energy input into them.  Your speed, your movements, and your weight all factor into this.  If the skis were marginally too stiff before, they may be actually too stiff for your skiing enjoyment now.  Try them.  Perhaps rent a similar pair one length shorter--skis are made stiffer as they're made longer--and see if those work better for you.

post #10 of 13

Check your binding settings.

post #11 of 13
You might get colder faster. I noticed that after I dropped a lot of weight.
post #12 of 13
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Check your binding settings.


He means check the chart to see if your new weight requires you to turn down the DIN setting.

post #13 of 13

DIN is the big one, as improper DIN is going to be a safety issue.

 

Otherwise, I imagine you're mainly going to notice a difference in the loading of the ski, which is basically storing energy in the flex of the ski through your turn that you typically would use to transition your edges as you link the next turn.  You'll get used to it fairly quickly I'd imagine though, and you can also compensate by the way you move your body through a turn, pushing down as you go into the bottom of a turn and lifting up as you transition edges.  Keep in mind that it is the downward force when the ski is on edge that makes it curve, so you will need to generate as much downward force when on edge to get the same curve as you did when you were heavier, or live with shorter turning radius while holding an edge.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: General Skiing Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › General Skiing Discussion › Does weight matter when downhill skiing?