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solid wax

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 
Hi all, i bought a set of bars of wax from holmenkol, a red stick for cold snow, a yellow stick for warm snow.

On the store's website the wax was described as needing to be applied molten with an iron, but on the box it shows it's a rub wax, with no reference to ironing

The wax is quite hard, it's difficult to scrape it with a nail, and it doesn't melt on contact with the skin, like a candle wax does

So from my point of view it is a solid bar.

My question for you is if i can just melt it with the iron at 100° as to avoid burning the wax

Here's a photo of it

post #2 of 15

I think most waxes like to melted in at about 180*F, I think the upper end is like 240*F, but I could be wrong on that, its been a long time since I worried about it. You want the iron hot enough to melt the wax but not smoke. Your new it this, read the threads here about waxing. Take your time until you get used to it. To cold is better then to hot when starting out.


Edited by Max Capacity - 1/7/16 at 8:10am
post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 
I'm waiting for some tools and probably in a week's time i will start waxing
post #4 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

I think most waxes like to melted in at about 180*, I think the upper end is like 240*, but I could be wrong on that, its been a long time since I worried about it. You want the iron hot enough to melt the wax but not smoke. Your new it this, read the threads here about waxing. Take your time until you get used to it. To cold is better then to hot when starting out.

This sounds good to me.  Just note that these temps. are F and NOT C.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by vmaprilia View Post

I'm waiting for some tools and probably in a week's time i will start waxing

See the above.  Your going to be good to go.  You can iron that wax.

post #5 of 15

Fixed it thanks, ;

post #6 of 15

Getting the temp is easy.  Start iron on low and keep turning it up until the wax melts nicely.  If the wax smokes you went too hot!

post #7 of 15

I typically set my iron at the lowest temp and then adjust based on how the wax melts on the iron.  I'm more concerned about burning the wax or my bases so I just keep that temp as low as possible.

post #8 of 15

I just leave my iron on the same setting and just pull the plug when I'm done using it. Next time just plug it in while I'm tuning the skis and by the time I'm ready to wax its ready to go.

post #9 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

I just leave my iron on the same setting and just pull the plug when I'm done using it. Next time just plug it in while I'm tuning the skis and by the time I'm ready to wax its ready to go.

I can do that 95% of the time but on occasion I need a really cold weather wax and it just won't melt at my default setting.

post #10 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by voghan View Post
 

I typically set my iron at the lowest temp and then adjust based on how the wax melts on the iron.  I'm more concerned about burning the wax or my bases so I just keep that temp as low as possible.


That's the ticket.  Lower heat means you can move the iron slower and read the wax.  Then you can make several passes and heat the ski slowly until you really get the wax moving.

post #11 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

I just leave my iron on the same setting and just pull the plug when I'm done using it. Next time just plug it in while I'm tuning the skis and by the time I'm ready to wax its ready to go.


Good wax iron won't take too long to heat up.  2 to 3 minutes max.  No reason to plug it in prior to that.

post #12 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by voghan View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 

I just leave my iron on the same setting and just pull the plug when I'm done using it. Next time just plug it in while I'm tuning the skis and by the time I'm ready to wax its ready to go.

I can do that 95% of the time but on occasion I need a really cold weather wax and it just won't melt at my default setting.


Colder waxes will need a hotter iron, no question.  As long as you stay under 240 F you should be okay.  Still, read the wax and take your time.  Also hard wax needs softer wax to grip to, so don't use all hard wax too many times without some soft waxes for it to bond to.

post #13 of 15
Thread Starter 

man, you people really are passionate

i like this forum because everybody puts soul into these posts, people don't get judged and you can really find valuable info here.

i can say that in my country this forum is the best source for dedicated ski info.

 

even if i don't ski as many days per year as i want ( last year did some 22 i think ), i just like to take care of my equipment, i find myself staring at the skis for hours, cleaning them, adjusting the bindings, and i think that this waxing process and edge sharpening is something very relaxing.

 

i have an old clothes iron with a thick metal base, so it should have good heat stability, i'll start low on temps and probably will get the hang of it

 

a little offtopic regarding passionate people and ski knowledge:

 

having a marker piston plate on a pair of skis, i didn't know how to set it up and asked for the service manual on marker.com website, choosing romania as my country.

after half a day, a guy answered and he told me that there isn't such a thing as a binding service manual, and i came to realise that the guy probably was mounting and setting up bindings without any proper info and guidance, which is not ok at all.

 

after that chat, i wrote again on marker.com choosing germany, this time a proper technician mailed me with the service manual attached and gave me short and practical explanations for the piston setup

 

i couldn't back off and mailed the whole chat to the romanian marker representative.

 

so in the end even if you are not skilled and lack a lot of info, you can learn by being passionate and curious, and reading alot

 

those being said, i hope from this season on i will glide fast, and steer good on my future sharp edges and waxed skis :)

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 


Good wax iron won't take too long to heat up.  2 to 3 minutes max.  No reason to plug it in prior to that.


It really doesn't take me much longer to prep the bases for waxing. My work table is always set up ready to go.

post #15 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Max Capacity View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Jacques View Post
 


Good wax iron won't take too long to heat up.  2 to 3 minutes max.  No reason to plug it in prior to that.


It really doesn't take me much longer to prep the bases for waxing. My work table is always set up ready to go.


Well then...........you way faster than me!  :beercheer:

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