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Most unique ski areas in North America - Page 3

post #61 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by x10003q View Post
 

:rotflmao:


It skis like Aspen if  Aspen was a couple of 600 vert double chairs serving green and blue trails that received 120" of snow per year.

 

Besides being in the middle of nowhere, the terrain is meh at best.

I did say miniature.

post #62 of 86

The most unique ski area I ever skied has to be Hogadon Ski Area in Casper, WY.  I remember going there for a USSA Northern Division race back in the early 70's traveling from Bozeman, MT.  I kept wondering when I would see the obvious signs of the ski hill only to be amazed that I was told we were there and in the parking lot.  I looked around, saw a lodge and no mountain!  I was then told that we park at the top and ski down.  Pretty far fetched stuff for a kid in 1970!  I ended up being a very decent race hill!!  Now the city of Casper owns it as a part of the Recreation Department, which is pretty unique as well!  Here's a link:  http://hogadon.net/hogadon_trail_map/

Hawk

post #63 of 86

Val D'Irene (aka Amqui).  It is in Quebec on the edge of the Chic Choc mountains.  It is unique for the following:

 

1) If you ski the backside of the mountain (North/Nord) there is no lift back up you need to take bus

2) The have something called the White Zone which is similar to the Slides at Whiteface

3) Their trail LaCascade was deemed the hardest in Quebec by a local newspaper

4) Started by a bunch of backcountry skiers

5) 100% Natural snow

6) some sort of funky conveyor belt/chairlift

 

Jim

post #64 of 86

I've put too much thought into this thread :)

 

If your really want unique, consider writing about Montereal, Mexico.  The area is located 5.5 hours south of San Antonio, Texas. You can ski year round on synthetic snow that is comparable to skiing hair brushes (skied on the stuff at Aviemore, Scotland on a cold, windy day - it hurts when you fall).  The place does have a chairlift and it is possible to ski there on real snow at times in Dec/Jan.

 

Another thought, while not exactly a ski resort (no lifts, need a 4 wheel drive vehicle), skiing on Mauna Kea, Hawaii is possible.  There is even a trail map for the mountain.   There was a recent article in Powder or Freeskier about skiing on Mauna Kea.

 

Cloudmont Ski, Mentone Alabama. Basically skiing on a golf course, 150ft vertical ft,  but who knew you could ski in Alabama.

 

Lastly, Marble Mountain, Newfoundland.  It really isn't that unique of a place from a skiing perspective (1700 vertical feet/39 trails/4 lifts).  What makes it unique is the remoteness.  I would argue Marble is the most remote ski area in North America, it is located on an island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

 

Jim

post #65 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayandally View Post

I've put too much thought into this thread smile.gif

If your really want unique, consider writing about Montereal, Mexico.  The area is located 5.5 hours south of San Antonio, Texas. You can ski year round on synthetic snow that is comparable to skiing hair brushes (skied on the stuff at Aviemore, Scotland on a cold, windy day - it hurts when you fall).  The place does have a chairlift and it is possible to ski there on real snow at times in Dec/Jan.

Another thought, while not exactly a ski resort (no lifts, need a 4 wheel drive vehicle), skiing on Mauna Kea, Hawaii is possible.  There is even a trail map for the mountain.   There was a recent article in Powder or Freeskier about skiing on Mauna Kea.

Cloudmont Ski, Mentone Alabama. Basically skiing on a golf course, 150ft vertical ft,  but who knew you could ski in Alabama.

Lastly, Marble Mountain, Newfoundland.  It really isn't that unique of a place from a skiing perspective (1700 vertical feet/39 trails/4 lifts).  What makes it unique is the remoteness.  I would argue Marble is the most remote ski area in North America, it is located on an island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

Jim

You do realize that remote island your refer to is the island of Newfoundland and is home to half a million people. (Though the ski area is quite far from most of the islands population base).
post #66 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayandally View Post
 

I've put too much thought into this thread :)

 

If your really want unique, consider writing about Montereal, Mexico.  The area is located 5.5 hours south of San Antonio, Texas. You can ski year round on synthetic snow that is comparable to skiing hair brushes (skied on the stuff at Aviemore, Scotland on a cold, windy day - it hurts when you fall).  The place does have a chairlift and it is possible to ski there on real snow at times in Dec/Jan.

 

Another thought, while not exactly a ski resort (no lifts, need a 4 wheel drive vehicle), skiing on Mauna Kea, Hawaii is possible.  There is even a trail map for the mountain.   There was a recent article in Powder or Freeskier about skiing on Mauna Kea.

 

Cloudmont Ski, Mentone Alabama. Basically skiing on a golf course, 150ft vertical ft,  but who knew you could ski in Alabama.

 

Lastly, Marble Mountain, Newfoundland.  It really isn't that unique of a place from a skiing perspective (1700 vertical feet/39 trails/4 lifts).  What makes it unique is the remoteness.  I would argue Marble is the most remote ski area in North America, it is located on an island in the Gulf of St. Lawrence.

 

Jim

 

Smokey Mountain Ski club in Labrador City, Labrador, Newfoundland is probably more remote..  That's where i learned to ski.

 

https://www.google.com/maps/@51.9504045,-65.4584525,6.5z

post #67 of 86

I was not familiar with Smokey Mountain - that maybe more remote

post #68 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by jayandally View Post
 

I was not familiar with Smokey Mountain - that maybe more remote

 

When I lived up there in the late 80's the only way to Labrador city was by plane or train.   The road in was a dirt road only open 3 months a year, and it was over 300 miles long just to the major cities on the St Lawrence Seaway

post #69 of 86

What about Howelsen Hill? I've never skied there, but there are a few unique things about it:

 

From their website:

 

-It has sent more skiers to international competition than any other area in North America. 

 

-It is Colorado’s oldest continuously operated ski area, since 1915

 

-It has the largest and most complete natural ski jumping complex in North America.

 

-It  has been the training ground for more than 79 Olympians making over 130 Winter Olympic appearances, 15 members of the Colorado Ski Hall of Fame, and 6 members of the National Ski Hall of Fame. 

 

-Howelsen Hill was recently acknowledged as a "Pioneer Ski Resort" by the International Skiing History Association and the Colorado Ski and Snowboard Museum and Hall of Fame."

post #70 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeSchmoe View Post

You do realize that remote island your refer to is the island of Newfoundland and is home to half a million people. (Though the ski area is quite far from most of the islands population base).

and even farther from the hundreds of millions on the mainland.

Howelsen is a good one. Aren't there a few other tiny municipal hills in CO, like in Silverton or Durango?
post #71 of 86
Ok, if we are going to include unique backcountry here is Bruneau Dunes ID biggrin.gif



post #72 of 86

Bet you can't guess which one he picked for North America for his National Geographic article to go with 14 other places.  Hint: it's not in Canada or Mexico.

 

http://adventure.nationalgeographic.com/adventure/trips/worlds-most-unusual-ski-areas

post #73 of 86

Fernie BC  Surrounded by avalanche prone peaks.  I asked a local on the chairlift about this. He said

he was caught in an avalanche here a few months ago and his friend was killed in an avalanche the

previous year in nearby backcountry.

 

He said BC would likely never allow Fernie to be built if it wasn't already there.:eek

post #74 of 86
Someone that was on this board and I were in one @ fernie on lookers right above a surface lift one year. They closed that area just after we skied it. It was like trying to ski down with dump truck loads of moving snow.
Edited by slider - 2/19/16 at 5:57pm
post #75 of 86

 Pajarito NM   small time operation run by the Los Alamos Ski Club (read Nuclear scientists)

Several slow chairs, open Fri-Sun only. In bad snow years (no snowmaking ? till recently) may only

be open 1 to 7 days total  all winter !

 

Red River Ski area NM.  Rustic old buildings ready to fall down, slow chairs.  Compares with MRG, Taos,

Plattekill, Blue Knob PA.

post #76 of 86

@JoeUT: you are correct about Brian Head:

 

https://jollyturns.com/resorts/country/united-states-of-america/utah?show=base-elevations

 

I ski mostly Tahoe. I like Heavenly for tree skiing and great out-of-bounds, side-country terrain.

 

On a recent trip to UT, I really enjoyed Brighton and Snowbird.

 

In British Columbia I like Fernie, Red Mountain and Kicking Horse.

post #77 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by teledance View Post

Whitepine ski area in Pinedale WY still had a single seat chairlift when I was there last. It was replaced but never made it back. Turner was a challenge when it was the longest T-bar.

Article on Turner: http://flatheadbeacon.com/2016/02/24/steep-cheap/
post #78 of 86
Nice read Sibhusky, have some friends who rent it out every year.
post #79 of 86

The Val D'Irene hill in the Gaspé region of Quebec. All natural snow (and usually lots of it, even this year). Isolated, not a lot of vertical, but terrific tree skiing and incredibly friendly locals in the town of Amqui. http://www.valdi.ski/

post #80 of 86
post #81 of 86

 

Mount Cain Alpine Park

 

http://www.mountcain.com/

 

on the northern tip of Vancouver Island. Crazy amounts of snow, surface lifts, tons of hike to terrain, and only open 3 days a week to allow the pow to be fresher...but yeah, its in the middle of nowhere.

 

Betcha didn't even know there was this much snow on the island...

post #82 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjs View Post
 

hoodoo

 

http://skihoodoo.com

 

Hoodoo, is that the ski area near Mt. Bachelor that advertises itself as "Steeper, Deeper, Cheaper"?

post #83 of 86

Loup Loup Ski Bowl

 

http://skitheloup.com/

 

Owned by a non-profit called Loup Loup Ski Education Foundation.  A very local ski area that serves the communities of Winthrop, Twisp, and Okanogan in North Central Washington.   It's hard to get to for anyone else, though I still have a goal of skiing there.  Over 1200' vertical and it's in an area well known for its excellent snow. 

post #84 of 86


That would be the one.  Fun area especially if Mt Bachelor is over run....

post #85 of 86
Quote:
Originally Posted by markjs View Post
 


That would be the one.  Fun area especially if Mt Bachelor is over run....


Where Skiing is still Magic.:D

post #86 of 86

Ski Cooper near Leadville, CO. Nothing fancy and a small mountain, but it has several things going for it. They really keep costs down, I think a full day ticket is like $50. It is in a stunningly gorgeous area. They have a sno cat skiing operation and nordic trails adjoining the area. They have a great ski school and thriving junior race program. High altitude and all natural snow make for a nice soft surface almost all of the time. It was the home of the 10th mountain division during WWII, so there is plenty of history to write about. Much of the ski industry in Colorado was created by people who came through Cooper in the 10th. Friendly service and terrific breakfast burritos.

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