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What should an improving intermediate look for in skis?

post #1 of 3
Thread Starter 

Skiing mostly groomers right now, but the ski should handle variable conditions and days when it snows/turns to slush etc, and venturing into powder as well. Since I haven't looked at skis for a while, there's a lot of confusing info - e.g. is it good to have some rocker in the tips? Some  threads say its better for turns, others say it reduces effectiveness of carving due to less area in contact. Another thing is width, they seem to be getting fatter, how much is too fat?

 

And like one of the other threads says - skis that are comfortable at low speeds but can handle going fast as well.

 

I'm not in a hurry to buy and am also on a budget, so will be demoi'ng for a while but would like some idea of what to aim for in the <$400 range (inc bindings).

post #2 of 3
What are you currently skiing?
post #3 of 3

For width I would stick right around 90mm underfoot, maybe a little narrower, but not much wider.  This will allow you to still carve turns and ski groomers without having to adjust your technique to accommodate for a wider platform, but will give you enough stability to start venturing into new conditions and terrain.  I would also definitely get a ski with tip rocker.  Tip rocker actually helps turn initiation on groomers and shouldn't take away from your ability to hold an edge as long as it's not a tremendous amount of rocker.  Tail rocker is up to you.  If you want to make skiing off piste or in softer snow a little easier, get a ski with tail rocker.  If you want to hold an edge through high speed, aggressive turns on groomers, don't get something with tail rocker, or at least not a lot of tail rocker.

 

With your budget being <$400 you'll likely want to look for a 2015 ski.  Here are some to consider:

 

2015 Volkl Kendo

2015 Blizzard Bushwacker

2016 Salomon Q-85

 

There's a lot in this category, but I think those 3 skis are good examples of what could potentially work well for you.  There's some variation among those 3 pairs.  The Kendo has metal in its construction, so will hold an edge the best, but is also the heaviest so will require more effort and skier input.  The Q-85 has the most rocker out of the three and is likely the "easiest" to ski, but won't be as energetic or responsive on groomers.

 

We're always happy to offer extra discounts to EpicSki members.  When you get closer to pulling the trigger feel free to contact us and we'll get you the best price possible!

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