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Powder vs All mountain skis

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

Hi, I recently bought the Rossignol Saffron 7 ski and when it arrived, i realised it was a lot fatter than i expected. I was just wondering if it will make it harder to control, having a 98mm waist? It is almost considered a powder ski, so would this make it harder to ski on groomed runs? Thanks 

post #2 of 6

Welcome to epicsk! We were just discussing this in another thread. the answer is yes, unless it's no: 

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/144015/tyranny-of-fat

post #3 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by blackdiamond111 View Post
 

Hi, I recently bought the Rossignol Saffron 7 ski and when it arrived, i realised it was a lot fatter than i expected. I was just wondering if it will make it harder to control, having a 98mm waist? It is almost considered a powder ski, so would this make it harder to ski on groomed runs? Thanks 


What region are you planning to ski in most of the time?  Groomed runs in the northeast are quite different than groomed runs in the Rockies or the PacNW.  What is your height/weight?

post #4 of 6

just read all 57 pages of this and all your questions will be answered.

http://www.epicski.com/t/129323/rant-overselling-wide-skis

 

But seriously--out west a lot of men, not so many women, use a ski of this width every day; in the east not so much. A lot depends on your size, and on the construction of the ski--stiffness, side cut and rocker, also what length you buy. Judging by my demoing the Soul 7, a somewhat similar ski, I'm guessing the Saffron 7 will be easy enough to turn, maybe not so great at holding and edge on firm snow. Hopefully a woman who has skied the Saffron 7 will respond, although it seems like the women are all out skiing while the men are here arguing. 


Edited by oldgoat - 12/31/15 at 6:08pm
post #5 of 6
Saffron 7 is identical to the Sin 7. It's a nice, easy skiing 98 that works well for lighter and/or less aggressive skiers. It's soft snow biased but not what I'd take to the hill for a groomer day.
post #6 of 6

It won't ski like an RC-4 on the groomers, but it will ski just fine where you are. It's not a matter of it being harder to control. It will simply be slower transitioning from one edge to the other so there will be some minor adjustment right out of the gate if you are used to quick, short radius turns. After you have time to become comfortable on them, you will be able to do short radius turns on the groom without thinking. It may not be to racing standards, but it skis groom pretty good. As you may be figuring out, most of us here have been skiing for many years or even many decades. We have racers, patrollers, instructors, shop guys, resort skiers, back country skiers, alpine and telemark skiers and even a few part and full time knuckle draggers thrown in the mix. With few exceptions, the western riders all have a multi ski/board quiver of gear. Usually a groomer/park, an all mountain and a powder tool. That Saffron 7 is a good all mountain ski to begin a quiver in the PNW and will ski everything quite well, but will excel in soft snow whether groomed or natural. You shouldn't worry about how it skis on a condition that is really quite rare in the west. The man made is covered up and groomers only get so firm in the west anyway. We don't have the really hard, icy conditions they get in the east. Just get out there and ski them. I don't think you will be disappointed. If you want to pick up a ski just for when the groomers are firm and chalky, you can always do that during the off season. The season is just really getting going and you are getting good snow up there. Get out there and enjoy it.

 

This may make some skinny ski people's heads explode, but for some reference, my groomer ski is 92mm in the waist, my all mountain ski is 95 or 96mm, I think and my powder boards are 113mm. The 92's gather dust most of the winter. I think I skied them once last winter. A solid all mountain ski that can handle a foot or two of powder is the go to ski for many, if not most western skiers. You might ski groomers out of the gate, but at some point in the morning, you start looking around at lines from the chair that are just screaming to be skied and typically, those lines are not groomed or they have mixed conditions and a wider platform will be the ticket when skiing varied terrain and snow conditions.

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