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Need gloves/mittens for cold/sweaty hands

post #1 of 15
Thread Starter 

i'm a real tall guy and don't have good circulation in my hands and feet.  feet are usually okay skiing, even though they get ridiculously sweaty but not too cold.  hands are different story and i usually get a cold sweat on them, like so wet they soak through my gloves but my fingers themselves are freezing cold.  i've tried glove liners and several types of gloves and it doesn't help.  this year i thought about getting some mittens but not sure if that will help.  anyone else have similar cold sweat problems like me?

 

oh, one other question: i'm going to be about 3 blocks this year from a lift, and instead of walking in my ski boots i thought about getting some slippers and spraying some waterproof coating on them.  something like this would probably fit in my jacket pockets once i take them off, and even provide some extra warmth/cushioning.  has anyone ever thought of doing that and have any ideas on what might work?

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000SKUFYS?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=ox_sc_act_title_1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER

post #2 of 15

Hi

 

Cant help for the glove problem, maybe consider an electric heated glove, if the problem is extreme?

 

But for the boots, wouldnt a boot protector like yaktrax or skiskootys be enough? I think its too much hassle to carry those loafers around while skiing

post #3 of 15
Thread Starter 

i don't know if the yaktrax would solve the problem...i was just trying to avoid having to walk 3 blocks in ski boots as they aren't the easiest thing in the world to walk in?

post #4 of 15

ah well, seems I misunderstood the problem :)

 

Maybe a boot with he walk/hike mode could help

 

That said, the slipper from your link doesnt seems it wouldnt be able to handle water/snow

 

There is a north face version called "traction mule" that has a rubber sole... That one could be, but its much heaveir than the normal "mule" (which is like the one from your link). I certainly would need a backpack to store them, instead of a jacket pocket....

post #5 of 15

I think give up on the baffins-those are more indoor type things and will turn to a mess,

 

Just wear full shoes (can get waterproof sneakers(look in the trail running section)  or dedicated snow fashionwear (moon boots/uggs) and then stash them in the lodge or locker or somewhere.

post #6 of 15
Ski patrol, I have the same issue as you with your hands. It's the sweat and the moisture buildup in the glove that makes the hands freeze. The solution is a more breathable glove. Outdry is the key material. I also take my gloves off for at least part of the time on lift rides, making sure that I am not sweating in the glove. You can also use very thin smart wool liners that will absorb the sweat. Once they get wet take them off and put them in your pocket. If you do all of the above and stay conscious about when your hands are sweating (and take your gloves off then), you can have warm hands all day as I do. Avoid very warm mittens and other super warm gloves. They will just make your hands sweat more. Hope that helps.
post #7 of 15

Seriously with the issues you folks are explaining use these as cheap vapor barrier gloves.  Your hands will be warmer (much) and the gloves will be drier.

 

post #8 of 15

Go mittens with glove liners as above.  I get cold hands easily and I use mittens a lot, but not exclusively.  Any time it gets to the mid 20s or below, though, it's mitten time and they are a LOT warmer than gloves IMHO.  The glove liners give a bit more warmth, but also allow you digital dexterity with some protection when you have to take the mitten off to futz with something.

post #9 of 15

Like Hedge says--the problem is the sweat. It won't matter how breathable your gloves are--they won't be able to keep up with the sweat. Try Drysol on your hands. You'll need a prescription unless you're in Canada. And thin wicking liners, use multiple pairs and change when they get wet. Make sure your gloves are big enough--if you try to cram even thin liners into gloves that fit well the constriction makes your hands colder instead of warmer. My son, who used to patrol, has a  problem with sweaty hands--especially climbing--and does fine with liners and xl kinco's.

 

I've operated (cervical sympathectomy) on people in the business world whose hands sweat so badly that they can't shake hands. Not a good idea for anyone who does sports. 


Edited by oldgoat - 1/1/16 at 8:35am
post #10 of 15

Nitrile mechanic's gloves + http://www.freethepowder.com/collections/gloves

 

$39.95, kept me warm on a +10°F day, and comfy.

post #11 of 15

Another vote for Freethepowder gloves or mittens. No waterproof membrane + softshell fabric means better breathability, and I've never had issues with moisture penetrating from the outside in. (I've also never worn them above freezing). Looks like they've got a new model with a removable liner, which should speed drying if you do manage to soak them. (or see above Nitrile liner suggestions) 

post #12 of 15
Thread Starter 

i just remembered when i first started up skiing a few years ago I had bought silk liners and had gloves, but wearing just the liners were better for me because my hands didn't sweat.  don't know why i forgot about that, but you fellas reminded me :)  i fell a lot that year and tore those up, but it sounds like i need to repeat something like that again...a breathable liner and another glove/mitten if it gets really cold on the lift.  looks like the freethepowder ones are a good choice, but if those thin silk liners worked for me when it was 20 degrees i'm wondering if i can get buy with some cheap sturdier breathable liners this year and not even worry with buying new gloves?  (ie only using the gloves i have if it gets really cold on the lifts.

 

good idea on wearing sneakers instead of buying specific shoes to walk in.  i have a ski backpack too...although i'm a lot better now than what was mentioned in the first paragraph, there is still always a possibility of falling.  i'm wondering how uncomfortable that would be to fall on sneakers that are in your backpack?

post #13 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipatrol View Post
 

i just remembered when i first started up skiing a few years ago I had bought silk liners and had gloves, but wearing just the liners were better for me because my hands didn't sweat.  don't know why i forgot about that, but you fellas reminded me :)  i fell a lot that year and tore those up, but it sounds like i need to repeat something like that again...a breathable liner and another glove/mitten if it gets really cold on the lift.  looks like the freethepowder ones are a good choice, but if those thin silk liners worked for me when it was 20 degrees i'm wondering if i can get buy with some cheap sturdier breathable liners this year and not even worry with buying new gloves?  (ie only using the gloves i have if it gets really cold on the lifts.

 

good idea on wearing sneakers instead of buying specific shoes to walk in.  i have a ski backpack too...although i'm a lot better now than what was mentioned in the first paragraph, there is still always a possibility of falling.  i'm wondering how uncomfortable that would be to fall on sneakers that are in your backpack?

Yea,

1) Stop by any with snow sports area and/or cold weather running and there a ton of "modern" liner gloves that vary in thickness.  You'll also find gloves for football, baseball,golf etc.    However, I doubt you'll find any liners that really are sturdy enough to handle falls or snow abrasion, if you're really in the snow a lot.  

If you really are set to go without a snowsport glove, and just want a breathable sturdy glove for warm weather, take a look at "mechanics"gloves meant for automotive work.

 

 

 

2) Falling on a backpack with sneakers is no different then falling on your backpack full of other things like a hard water bottle or sneakers or whatever.  Part of it is your backpack design and if it has padded back to begin with, and what else you packed it with, and what you fall on.  Skiing with a backpack is a bit more constrained than from skiing free, so you might want to just stash your backpack somewhere, and only ski with it on your first run in and last run out..

post #14 of 15
Quote:
Originally Posted by Skipatrol View Post
 

i'm a real tall guy and don't have good circulation in my hands and feet.  feet are usually okay skiing, even though they get ridiculously sweaty but not too cold.  hands are different story and i usually get a cold sweat on them, like so wet they soak through my gloves but my fingers themselves are freezing cold.  i've tried glove liners and several types of gloves and it doesn't help.  this year i thought about getting some mittens but not sure if that will help.  anyone else have similar cold sweat problems like me?

 

oh, one other question: i'm going to be about 3 blocks this year from a lift, and instead of walking in my ski boots i thought about getting some slippers and spraying some waterproof coating on them.  something like this would probably fit in my jacket pockets once i take them off, and even provide some extra warmth/cushioning.  has anyone ever thought of doing that and have any ideas on what might work?

 

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000SKUFYS?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=ox_sc_act_title_1&smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER


Can't answer your gloves question, but as to Part 2, they do make shoes specifically for the purpose. 

 

CO-based Pakems: http://pakems.com

 

Spain's Xnowmate: http://xnowmate.com/en/

 

Not sure that the Pakems are waterproof, but they're packable shoes designed for skiing. The Xnowmates are definitely waterproof, and better looking imo, but look like they'd need a backpack for carrying. 

 

This one from Timberland launched a few years ago, not sure if it's still available. Each shoe zippers in half for easy storage. http://www.amazon.com/Timberland-Radler-Trail-Camp-Collapsible/dp/B006ZSBE1A

 

There might be others out there, too, and I think any of those actual shoes would beat your DIY smooth-soled Baffin slipper. I'd wear a backpack and use regular shoes before putting my feet through that.  LLBean shearling-lined slides are a nice, warm, relatively compact option if you go the pack route. 

post #15 of 15

Here's the LLBean slide. I bought a pair last year and love them for pre/post snowboarding. They're super quick to slide on, an advantage when my cold foot is hovering over cold, wet, slushy parking lot. They are quite warm and comfy - I wear them without socks to walk the dog in winter and keep quite comfortable, so long as I don't have to trudge through snow.  

 

I used to have a similar set of Baffin slides, which were also good, but I think they stopped making them. They were more expensive and didn't have the shearling, so I'd say I like the LLBean ones better overall - like a slipper you can wear outside. 

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