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Crack in my boot

post #1 of 10
Thread Starter 

The boots: Atomic Hawx 120, 4ish years old. 

 

I just noticed a new crack in the plastic on my right boot, right at the ankle transition/flex area, or the point of the the steepest curve from hortizontal (top of foot) to vertical (shin). It's about 1/2 inch long, perpendicular to the boot length, just above the second top-of-foot buckle.

 

Right now, the crack isn't causing any noticeable problems with performance/flex, but I fear it will expand, weaken the boot further, and possibly let water in (even after duct taping) when it gets warmer. The boots have seen a good amount of use, but aren't that old by ski boot standards, and I'd rather not replace them if I don't have to...which leads to the question:

 

Should bother trying to get it fused/repaired at the shop, or is this an indication that the boots' plastic has become brittle with age and use...meaning it's time for replacement? Don't want to pay for a repair if the plastic is past its prime, and other issues are likely either way. 


Edited by LiveJazz - 12/29/15 at 12:50pm
post #2 of 10
They don't seem to be anywhere near old enough to be an age problem, but I certainly would be worried that they'd fail at the wrong time. Was there heating done at this part of the boot? Or were they left laying around unbuckled and someone kicked them? Pictures would help.
post #3 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

They don't seem to be anywhere near old enough to be an age problem, but I certainly would be worried that they'd fail at the wrong time. Was there heating done at this part of the boot? Or were they left laying around unbuckled and someone kicked them? Pictures would help.

 

No heating during the fitting process or after. I do have a tendency to forget to fully buckle them after each use, but I'm gentle when handling them, and make sure all the plastic is back "in place". Is the small amount of force generated from lifting a unbuckled boot really enough to crack that plastic, compared to the forces applied when taking boots on and off, or just flexing them while skiing?

 

Can't provide pics at the moment. I left them up in the mountains, and I'm down in Denver. But for reference, the crack is about the same location and length as the green line below, on the top part of the plastic overlap:

 

post #4 of 10

Is it possibly a warranty issue? i realize that they are 4 years old, but maybe. I say this because I had the exact same issue with my Fischer RC4 Vacuums. They were replaced with no question.

post #5 of 10

It's a fairly common problem.  Depending on your relationship with the shop, you might be able to get them warrantied.

If not, try to stop the crack by drilling a hole.

post #6 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

It's a fairly common problem.  Depending on your relationship with the shop, you might be able to get them warrantied.

If not, try to stop the crack by drilling a hole.

Thanks...I have a very good relationship with the shop, and certainly will take it them for assessment. Can you clarify where/how one would drill a hole to stop the crack?

post #7 of 10
Seems like that might be, depending on the boot, the point at which the overlaps could be miswrapped and one piece of plastic cuts into the other? Can't see the crack without pictures, but I know I have to be careful of mine.
post #8 of 10
What Shredhead suggests should stop the crack from getting bigger.
post #9 of 10
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Seems like that might be, depending on the boot, the point at which the overlaps could be miswrapped and one piece of plastic cuts into the other? Can't see the crack without pictures, but I know I have to be careful of mine.

 

That happened my my dad's boot awhile back...definitely not the case here. It's more of a fissure/stress crack than a plastic-on-plastic gouge. 

 

Roundturns and SHREDHEAD, I think I see how drilling a hold would stop the crack. If you drill it at the furthest point of track in from the edge of the plastic, you're creating a more solid plastic boundary, which would prevent further expansion of the fissure. 

post #10 of 10

generally, to stop a crack, you drill a hole at the end (or ends) of the crack - a larger hole relieves the stress concentration at the tip of a crack and prevents it from propagating. O~~~~~O

 

I haven't done this on ski boots but have done it on plastic hockey shin pads and lasted for years without propagating further.  

 

Same technique is used in commercial and military airframe repair.

 

Call your shop first for warranty coverage though.

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