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cross country equipment out of track

post #1 of 23
Thread Starter 

New to cross country skiing looking for input on what will work well out of track.

closest groomed areas are over 2 hours away looking for ideas on gear that will work on some of the closer un-groumed trails out here in the north west.

 

Moderator Note: moved to Backcountry, Telemark, & Cross Country

post #2 of 23
post #3 of 23
post #4 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonorchid View Post
 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jkvm4fsD3I4

good info thanks

so a 70+ will probably be best out here with how this year is shaping up.

post #5 of 23

I think so.

 

I like my Fischer S-Bound 78's, am currently playing with the Alpina Alaska (BC-NNN version), boot.

post #6 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by neonorchid View Post
 

I think so.

 

I like my Fischer S-Bound 78's, am currently playing with the Alpina Alaska (BC-NNN version), boot.

 

 

How do you like the Alaskan's and what type of foot do you have?

 

I'm on Rossi BC110 ski with the Rossi BC-NNN X10 boot and the plastic cuff already broke.  The cuff is not very beefy and I don't think I'll get them again, even though they fit perfect.

 

I will be looking at the Alaska and the Crispi Svartsen, but there aren't many places to try them on.

post #7 of 23
Thread Starter 

been looking around today.

unfortunately the closest ski shop is 2 hours away so will be a little while before i can go in and see what actually fits me. 

from the reading i have been doing i am looking closely at the Madshus Eon.185

with the NNN BC Mag bindings.

i would love to grab up those Alpina  Alaska boots but a little bit out of the price range at the moment looking at a Alpina BC 1550

post #8 of 23

Nice ski.

 

I've used just about every BC-NNN boot on the market.

 

Don't get the 1550 boot, they will crease down on your big toenail cuticle with every stride and feel like it's gonna pull the nail off:( I even tried another size and it still did it.

Go with the Alaska or Montana, some deals around on last years Alaska (same boot just different color shoelace).

 

Fischer BCX-6 will eventually pinch inwards at the metatarsals both pinkie toe and big toe. Mine also broke down above the ankle pocket, yet another source of pain.

 

Newest Rossignol BC X6 is ok, they got the toebox right, (prior generation was bad), ankle/heel pocket not so good. Lower cuff closure not so comfortable with deep forward flexing. lacing only comes up as far as the top of instep articulation point which is kind of sucky. Rossi BC X10 has a much nicer upper cuff, more comfort with more support but the F'd up the heel pocket worse then the BC X6. I had two pairs sent and both were messed, excess plastic ridge within the heel pocket seam which you will feel dig into your foot, also the contoured padding within the inside lining was way out of place on one boot! Absolutely terrible quality control, and that's their top of the line BC-NNN boot, the low end BC X2 is better in that regard, still not so good heel hold down.

 

The two Salomon X-ADV whatever's also has it's problems. It's nice and narrow at the heel with great heel hold but the plastic eyelets of the lacing system have little to no padding of the tongue to overlap and will dig into your foot, ouch! And it's knobby sole is heavy, adds unwanted weight.

 

Madshus Gliterind BC-NNN boot is silly wide, fits like a bucket, also has to low of a cuff closure that digs into foot with flexing. Latest version released last season may be ok, It looks better in pic's, probably still stupid wide, Idk, haven't seen it available anywhere or anywhere online not out of the country and with a decent return policy.

 

Not much left to try. If the Alaska's turn into a nightmare I'm getting a lightweight Rando racing AT boot/tech binding and a ski like the G3 stinger xcd. Perhaps a plastic Scarpa Alien or if I win the lottery, a Alien 2.0, Dynafit DNA or La'Sportiva Stratos Evo. Would be more fun and a hell of lot lighter too! If I lived in proximity to the mountains I'd be watching every off season blow out sale and used gear site for the stuff.

 

Hope this helped.

 

Of course, YMMV

post #9 of 23

 I would agree that the Alpina 1550 is not a comfortable boot.  Too bad, b/c it's the most widely available. 

However... I and my wife have had great luck with the Alpina 2150,  More secure in the ankle and w/o the creasing problem of the 1550.

post #10 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by tch View Post
 

 I would agree that the Alpina 1550 is not a comfortable boot.  Too bad, b/c it's the most widely available. 

However... I and my wife have had great luck with the Alpina 2150,  More secure in the ankle and w/o the creasing problem of the 1550.

dose not look like the 2150 is in production any more possible name change to the explorer boot or Traverse looks very close. but for the price they want for that boot might as well fork over the rest for the Alaska  

post #11 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

 

 

How do you like the Alaskan's and what type of foot do you have?

 

I'm on Rossi BC110 ski with the Rossi BC-NNN X10 boot and the plastic cuff already broke.  The cuff is not very beefy and I don't think I'll get them again, even though they fit perfect.

 

I will be looking at the Alaska and the Crispi Svartsen, but there aren't many places to try them on.


Apologize for missing your post earlier.

 

Anyway, I have a low volume sorta high arch, narrow ankle/heel, and wide forefoot from metatarsals to outer tips of toes. To put it in perspective Alpine boot wise, I'm in a Solomon X-Max 120 Alpine boot, they fit my toes without needing to be molded, punched, etc. Rare for me to find a boot that fit's like that, I couldn't wear any prior Solomon Alpine boots, was in a Nordica SpeedMachine 110, no boot fitter work to toes needed, it ended up being too high volume of the diagonal articulation point to heel.

 

The Alaska is a closer fitting boot then the Rossi BC X10/X6. I had more toe wiggle room in the Rossi. The Alaska heel cup/pocket is much more comfortable. It is a leather boot and requires little bits of break in here and there.

Out of the box flexing, the forefoot needs to "break" after the second eyelet or just in front of and behind the second eyelet for comfort. One did the other required some assistance to get it going in the correct location, actually that's the one which now flexes just in front of and just behind the second eyelet.

Additionally, the tongue will press inward against the articulation point of the foot with deep knee bends. That too is breaking in by toying with the lacing and flexing, i.e., cuff laced looser, mid section looser and then tighter. Eventually the tongue began to "lift up" some further down on my foot, somewhere between third and fourth eyelet. This lifting or upward crease, allowed for the movement needed to relieve the pressure at the articulation point with deep knee bends. I expect that to improve further with use. It would not be a issue with casual striding. I initially ordered a size 41, they call it a US 8, that's what I wear in most other shoes. At that size the tongue issue was not abating via the upward flex point further down. Also had more heel lift, expected. The 40 is working better. It is however a little tighter and I would not be able to wear a heavy sock. I generally ski with a thin sock so not much of a issue there. So far just carpet testing, walking around the house, doing lunges and trying to simulate xc skiing, we have no snow here in the East:(

Was getting optimistic when I saw Gore was predicted to get a foot or more for yesterday/todays storm, would've did Alpine at Gore then XC down the road at Garnet Hill, only it didn't materialize. Maine and The Whites did alright but it's a 9 hour drive, not something I wanna do without alternate drivers and I couldn't put that together on short notice. Way it goes sometime.

I'll try to remember to post a update after I get them on snow.

post #12 of 23
Thread Starter 

Went over the hill to a city with a Ski shop and the local shop did very well on setting me up with some equipment.

price came in at just a hair over $30 ish more than i found hunting around online all last week. Kinda impressed they were not crazy over priced like most local sports stores. 

Rossi BC X10 seen the mixed reviews but they fit extremely well will have to see how they do in the long run.

Madshus Eon with NNN BC Magnum

 

Hit some snow on the way back and i believe i will like this setup.

Now i just need to find someone around here to pick up a few lessons from to help me suck less.

post #13 of 23
You will like the new setup and it will last a long time.
Just be careful cranking on the power strap on the Bcx10's.
post #14 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

You will like the new setup and it will last a long time.
Just be careful cranking on the power strap on the Bcx10's.


Eon is a good ski. He will be happy with it, I know I would.

 

BCX10 should have been given the carbon fiber "skeleton boot" cuff of the BCX12 and the lacing should continue up higher then it does, IMO. Lateral support comes from the cuff, boot only laces to the instep articulation point like a sneaker. If you don't keep that cuff tight, (more so depending on your anatomy), likely your heel will lift too much and the boot would also be rather floppy laterally.

post #15 of 23
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

You will like the new setup and it will last a long time.
Just be careful cranking on the power strap on the Bcx10's.

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by neonorchid View Post
 


Eon is a good ski. He will be happy with it, I know I would.

 

BCX10 should have been given the carbon fiber "skeleton boot" cuff of the BCX12 and the lacing should continue up higher then it does, IMO. Lateral support comes from the cuff, boot only laces to the instep articulation point like a sneaker. If you don't keep that cuff tight, (more so depending on your anatomy), likely your heel will lift too much and the boot would also be rather floppy laterally.

 

I am happy with it...

fits my foot extremely well

can add a strap to the boot if it looks like it might fail but it has a 2 year warranty from Rossi

will have to and see how they do in the long term

post #16 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by ShadowRWolf View Post
 

 

 

I am happy with it...

fits my foot extremely well

can add a strap to the boot if it looks like it might fail but it has a 2 year warranty from Rossi

will have to and see how they do in the long term

Fit is paramount, I'm glad they're working out for you. Enjoy.

post #17 of 23

Follow-up. Finally got to use the Alpina Alaska thanks to around two feet of snow where I live over the past weekend. I swapped out the nice stock insole for a merino wool Superfeet insole because I like the arch support. Also sized "down" according to Alpina's sizing, interestingly the size 40 outsole is exactaly the same length and look of the Rossignol BCX10 size 41 and my old Fischer BC-X6 size 41. However it fits sung, less forefoot room then a Rossignol, a little tighter then the Fischer but with a much better toe shape. I use a rather thin sock, pretty much have to but also prefer to, given the option.

 

So far, having used them twice, (couldn't physically take any more skiing), I like the boot. All issues mentioned in previous post seem to be working themselves out and the fit is secure. Heel hold not bad for a bc-nnn touring boot. Lateral support is nice too. I did flat rolling hills along a creek and ventured out of the gorge into the woods up and down trails of some good sized hillsides.

I hope they continue to hold up and work as well as they are now, time will tell...

post #18 of 23

Eon is a great ski--that would have been one of what I suggested, as well as looking at the Onion River videos.  Another shop I like is Akers in Maine.  I bought the slightly wider Epochs last year from the Mountaineer in Keene Valley, NY and love them so far.  Although a little too wide for set tracks, they actually kick and glide really well.  I had used mainly waxable skis prior and was worried about the grip and glide but I have been more than impressed with them.  I have a Rossi BCX-11 boot, which I don't love, but I got it cheap from Sierra Trading Post.  I find it's bunchy in the front and rubs my shins in one spot, especially when cranked tight.  I could probably stand to go down a size, but such is life.  

post #19 of 23
Thanks for the review.

What size street shoe and what alpine boot/model do you wear?
post #20 of 23

I wear a men's US 11 street shoe and a mondo 26.5 Lange ski boot.  The Rossi boots are Euro 45, as are my other XC boots.  (Wouldn't it be nice if everyone used the same sizing?) t just found a Scarpa T4 on Ebay for a good price, which I ordered in a mondo 27.  Looking forward to using them with the Epochs and learning to telemark better.

post #21 of 23

How about Neonorchid?

post #22 of 23

On a Branic scale I measure a size 7.5 total length with a size 8 arch length (heel to first metatarsal head), C/D width (I forget).

Low volume, decent arch, narrow'ish heel, short toes/big toe the longest, "flipper" shape, not the standard long mutilated toes into a cone shape that the majority of footwear is cut for. No bunions or other abnormalities. Can't wear a Keen or Altra, toe shape good, too wide everywhere else!

 

Btw, I find little standardized sizing between footwear brands.

 

Alpine boot Salomon X-Max 120 25.5 (most size down in this boot, I didn't).

Current sneaker size 8 Nike Air Zoom Terra Kiger 3 trail-running shoes. Get 8's in other brands too.

Dress shoes varry from a US 7 (not often), 7.5 and 8.

Hiking boot, Asolo size US 8,

Casual shoes usually a 8 sometimes 7.5

 

 

Again, I returned the Alpina Alaska size 41, went with a 40 which is built on a 41 bc-nnn outsole. The Supperfeet merino wool insole cut for my old 41 Fischer BCX6 boot, fit the 40 Alaska lengthwise.

post #23 of 23
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post


What size street shoe and what alpine boot/model do you wear?

 

I think you'll find that the euro shoe size printed on your sneaker tongue is a lot closer to your nominal XC ski boot size (nominal meaning absent mfg. differences) than any US or Mondo sizing.

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