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Rossignol Experience 80

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

Hi -- first time poster here.  Looking at the Rossignol Experience 80 skis. There seem to be mixed reviews - some say this is a beginner ski, others say it's advanced.  Any thoughts?

 

I'm relatively new to skiing -- snowboarded for 10 years -- and have now skied only 4 times and plan to stick with skiing.  Also, is 176cm good for me? I'm 6'1" and 170 lbs.  Not looking for speed on mainly groomed trails. 

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 12

I've searched info on this exact ski since last year many times over. And fwiw to you (FYI) its the same model this year as last year. For all general purposes its a solid intermediate ski and a good one to advance past the intermediate front side skills with. It is all wood core and at 80mm underfoot (especially for east coast hardpack) its not a beginner ski. It is known to be a lighter ski and a bit softer which would provide some needed forgiveness and also snow versatility but is also known to hold very well on edge and provide a better skier with pretty good carving performance even when pushed. Too many reviews have indicated well received praise for this ski.  I have dug for review after review on this ski and not really a bad one anywhere and collectively the reviews say what I mentioned above. I just bought these for my son who is advancing intermediate east coast skier and is 6'2" @ 220 lb. Your 170lb and depending on over all skill ability level I'd suggest 170 if your skills are of more beginner in nature or 177 if your already carving a good amount. if you need a lot of improvement I think 184 would be too much ski. But over all I think you'd be in a great (all mountain front side bias) ski to use and also advance with for quite some time. I simply have gathered a lot of info on this ski not only from searching on line but also speaking to people who have skied them. Hope this helps.

post #3 of 12
The E80 seems to be a good fit for you overall. Is there a particular reason why you're going for the E80?

About your height or slightly shorter is a good place to start. You're a bit light for your weight so 176cm could work. Short skis are easier to learn.

You don't want stiff skis as your starter. I have the E88 and I read that the E80 is softer. It should be good for you there as well.

Narrow skis are easier to learn. 80mm probably is considered narrow by today's standard although my narrow skis are below 70mm. You're probably ok with 80mm.
post #4 of 12
I would go longer than 176 for your size, since most modern skis have tip rocker and ski short. Since you have a snowboarding background you should be able to pick up skiing fairly fast, and a short ski isnt going to be fun much past the begginer stage IMO, especially if you ski off groomed runs or in powder. If you ski a traditional flat tail carving ski a 176 is fine, but in a modern ski i would look for a 180ism cm ski.
I dont feel anyone should handycap themselves with short skis, you should pick the flex and sidecut that goes with how you ski.
Edited by clink83 - 12/29/15 at 12:19am
post #5 of 12
Double post.
post #6 of 12
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the feedback.  At 165lbs - REI is telling me to go with the 168cm instead of 176cm.  hmm....

post #7 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

I would go longer than 176 for your size, since most modern skis have tip rocker and ski short. Since you have a snowboarding background you should be able to pick up skiing fairly fast, and a short ski isnt going to be fun much past the begginer stage IMO, especially if you ski off groomed runs or in powder. If you ski a traditional flat tail carving ski a 176 is fine, but in a modern ski i would look for a 180ism cm ski.
I dont feel anyone should handycap themselves with short skis, you should pick the flex and sidecut that goes with how you ski.

fwiw I believe you took part in another thread where I brought up something I have read about elsewhere. And that tip rocker on (frontside bias ) all mountain skis is not anything huge and once on edge (which is where most spend most time) the skier is now engaging the whole ski anyway. And therefore needs to still handle the whole ski. Of course that is debatable. Plus there is the leverage issue where as the longer the ski, the more is there to handle regardless of rocker or not. Lets take the full rocker (frontside bias) volkl rtm ski. If we followed suit with the current logic that ski should be made in 200cm and more. I do think 176 is good on this lighter ski for his height even if he is lighter but a lot still has to do with just what his over all ability is and also how fast he'll progress. I'm not tryig to dictate right or worng cause I don't think their really is one but just offering opinion.

post #8 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by rollin View Post

once on edge (which is where most spend most time)
This is most likely not true. According to an article in the January 2016 issue of "Ski," less than 10% of skiers actually carve, so most skiers are not actually on edge. The people on this forum do not, in general, represent a good cross section of the skiing population, it is highly skewed in the direction of advanced to expert skiers.
post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post


This is most likely not true. According to an article in the January 2016 issue of "Ski," less than 10% of skiers actually carve, so most skiers are not actually on edge. The people on this forum do not, in general, represent a good cross section of the skiing population, it is highly skewed in the direction of advanced to expert skiers.

I could understand that but I could also debate that with the notion that even sliding/skidding turns still puts people on their inside edges. and the steeper the slope the more rolled the ski even skidding.  Heck, even beginners who snow plow are using inside edges on a slightly rolled skis. A slight bend from skiers weight in the middle and slight roll is all it takes to have the entire edge on a barely rockered ski get caught. Its usually why beginners and intermediates fall. The theory imo of rocker not being in contact with snow only works (generally speaking) while flat. So imo it would then ski shorter be less hooky (for lack of a better term) there and also help one to transition easier to begin and break from a turn. But once there its still a longer ski and again I would mention the leverage thing. In contact with ground or not its still more leverage to handle further away from a center (or boot) place. Again more to handle. I really think its worth questioning that it all may not be so 100% correct. But that's just my .02

post #10 of 12
You can debate all you want, but every single ski i have skied with early rise or tip rocker skis short, and initates turns easier than a cambered ski. I dont think you will find anyone who has tried a lot of skis would debate that. There is no reason to short yourself of effective edge, especially for an east coast skier. Unfortunatly the e80 has a huge length increase between the 176 and the largest ski.
post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by mtcyclist View Post

This is most likely not true. According to an article in the January 2016 issue of "Ski," less than 10% of skiers actually carve, so most skiers are not actually on edge. The people on this forum do not, in general, represent a good cross section of the skiing population, it is highly skewed in the direction of advanced to expert skiers.

Yeah I thought I was carving until I was, then I found out I wasn't. Now I need to go to the next level and find out I still wasn't really carving. True carving is harder than it looks on video! That being said, I did feel the extended sidecut of my old Rossi Experience 83 (rocker/camber/rocker) kick in when I got onto higher edge angles. A very reassuring feeling instead of sliding around. I was skiing the 184 cm length being 6'6" and 230 lb. That version had basalt like the E88, so probably stiffer than either the newer E80 or E84. Not an advanced ski, but a good one to get ready for one.
post #12 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

You can debate all you want, but every single ski i have skied with early rise or tip rocker skis short, and initates turns easier than a cambered ski. I dont think you will find anyone who has tried a lot of skis would debate that. There is no reason to short yourself of effective edge, especially for an east coast skier. Unfortunatly the e80 has a huge length increase between the 176 and the largest ski.

I hear ya. I wont adamantly argue against it but questioning and debating things within good reason for sake of interest and best knowledge is just my way. But yea the next ski for the 80 is 184 and agree a considerable jump. Over 3inches is a lot more ski. I just got my son the 176 who is barely an intermediate and not yet carving and he is 6'2 @ 220. I even at first considered  the E77 for him but due to his size went with the 80 but kept the length the same. Imo he should be able to grow with this ski for the near future especially being we only get to ski minimal amount per season.

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