or Connect
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Climbing the wall - Page 3

post #61 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I think it's more important where your TORSO is 'looking' than where your eyes are looking.

Very true Kneal but don't discount the eyes.... aka the head.  If the head is looking where the torso is looking you have lost the turn.   

post #62 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Kneale Brownson View Post

I think it's more important where your TORSO is 'looking' than where your eyes are looking.

 

Kneale... you could say that about all kinds of things skiing.  

 

I think it's more important where your balance is than where your eyes are looking. 

 

I think it's more important where your pressure is than where your eyes are looking. 

 

I think it's more important how smoothly you roll on and off edge than where your eyes are looking. 

 

They are all valid statements. But until you get to assess the individual skier, they're just a series of blanket statements. 

post #63 of 69
When your head is on a swivel (safety consideration), does it impact ski performance?

Where your torso moves makes a big difference.
post #64 of 69

Kneale, yes, of course your torso movement makes a huge difference in skiing. 

 

But let's not misunderstand the importance of a person's head. Your eyes are a sensory input. Your inner ear contains your balance centre. Plus your head is still attached to the trunk below and for many people, where they look impacts their direction travel.  

 

As a sensory input: For those of us who've ever ridden in a motorcycle and looked at the ground below us - yikes! In skiing, looking at your tips is the same. Where we look plays a large part in our perception of speed. 

 

As a balance sensor: You'll notice ballet dancers focus on a fixed point when they do a pirouette. You've probably felt your balance messed up after doing multiple 360s in one direction. So the way the head moves affects our sense of balance. 

 

As a part of a kinetic chain: Turn your head 90 degrees to the side right now, then turn it the other way. Unless you're very deliberate or have a very loose neck, you've likely turned at least some of your body. Consider that young kids move where their eyes are - many of us still do the same. The head actually affects the torso! (I.e. we need to retrain our body to not turn just because our head does.)

 

So does your head have the potential to impact ski performance? I'd say yes. Moreso than the torso? It depends on that skier's individual issues. 

post #65 of 69

Where you look with your eyes affects your head and where you turn your head affects your body. I'm very particular with pointing out to students that they should "neck angulate", hahaa I just invented a new word, in order to avoid banking. Tilting their head outwards in the turn. Angulating at the hip starts with angulating at your neck. Then you level your shoulders, bend at your waist and at the hip. This sequence of movements goes along the kinetic chain top to bottom and ends at your knees and feet. A whole body bend. A banana. This is what climbing the wall means to me, holding on to this position late in the turn and letting your skis carve across underneath your torso and continue out to the other side, up an imaginary wall. He was saying that he imagined skiing down a bobsleigh track and by letting the skis carve across underneath he was able to pass through the entrance of the track. If he did not "climb the wall" to get that extra height and project his skis out from underneath his body he would be missing it on the downhill side.

 

As a side note, you should be able to look and turn your head in different directions without it affecting where your torso is facing too much.

post #66 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post
 

I must be getting it because, the more I read this thread, the more I feel like I am climbing the wall.

 

Or banging your head against it..... :devil:

post #67 of 69
post #68 of 69
Quote:

 

In what way do you think embodied cognition or learning relates to the specific theory of climbing the wall? Not skiing in general.

post #69 of 69
Quote:
Originally Posted by tdk6 View Post
 

 

In what way do you think embodied cognition or learning relates to the specific theory of climbing the wall? Not skiing in general.

I was referring more to the "you end up where you look" concept in skiing. Kind of like the outfielder is comparing where in his field of view the ball is, the skier can determine if/how he is going to make the next gate or not just by looking at or close to it, without making a complicated estimations of the trajectory.

Sometimes I tell my racers to focus on a location outside of the gate, otherwise they may go too straight towards it.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Instruction & Coaching