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SkiVisions tunning equipment

post #1 of 14
Thread Starter 
Hi guys!

I am looking for fellow skiers that are using those tools to tune their skis and can provide some feedback. I was able to find here in these forums threads on the Base Flattener and Structuring tool, but I am interested to hear from those using the entire SkiVisions system on a regular basis to tune their skis.
I already purchased the Base Flattner and Strusturing tool and watched all the videos of how to use all the tools, but would like hear from somebody that has the experience with the Edge Tuning tool and everything else.
Thank you in advance!
Stan
post #2 of 14
I don't think any of us use just one brand. We're looking at the tool, not the label, then buying the one we like the best in that category. It doesn't mean it is the best, it just means at the time, the price was right, there wasn't a competitor we liked better, etc. Yes, after buying and liking one tool in a brand, I might look at that brand first next time, but that's about as far as it goes.
post #3 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you sibhusky for your reply! I agree with you, I also do not use one brand exclusively, but was wondering if somebody has more feedback on Skivisions complete line of tools, not just the Base Flattener and Structure tool.
I have been trying tuning skis for the past three years only. So I do not have a lot of experience. I started with buying a simple kit from Racewax. Last winter I invested in more tools this time from Swix (table, vise, side and base edge tools, files, diamond stones, iron, more scrapers and brushes), so I felt like I had it pretty much all that a recreational advanced skier with two young ski racers dad would need. I went to a few ski tuning clinics and was advised to get the bases of the skis ground at the beginning of every season with the base edge set and do the rest by myself. The problem is that I can't get a good job done from the local shop on the base grind and the base edge, so I started looking at alternatives and ran into the Skivisions tools. The Base Flattener and Structure tool was a no brainer for me, so I started wondering if somebody had the same or similar experience like me and is using the Skivisions tools and methods shown in the videos to keep up with the maintenance of the skis. I have always been told not to try to set the base angle myself and when I get damage to it to just use diamond stones to remove the burr by hand, no tools (I don't even know why I got the Swix base angle tool in this case). Therefor I am looking for some feedback on the rest of the Skivisions tools and methods (especially the Edge Tuning tool), because if I am going to flatten and structure my own bases then eventually I will have to deal with the base angle.
 
Thank you!
Stan
post #4 of 14
I interpret the base flatener to be like a wood plane for ski bases. Looks like hard work to me.
post #5 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sushev View Post

Therefor I am looking for some feedback on the rest of the Skivisions tools and methods (especially the Edge Tuning tool), because if I am going to flatten and structure my own bases then eventually I will have to deal with the base angle.
 
Thank you!
Stan

If you mean this thing:

ski$20sharp$20top$20with$20labels$20gif.gif

I personally have no experience with it, but I believe it's an adjustable angle? Although I own such a thing, it is not the tool of choice FOR ME because I really don't trust the angle to be firmly locked in to the same spot every time. And I mean the SAME spot, not a hair (or a tenth of a hair) different than last time. Adjustable tools are nice for half a degree angles like a 2.5 if you're not sure you want to make a full degree change from 2 to 3 (yes, I know A-man, just do it..). And they're are nice for figuring out what an angle IS if you don't know, but once you know, you buy the fixed angle. The alternative is to buy a fixed angle with a shim set to give yourself variety for setting angles.
Edited by sibhusky - 12/20/15 at 4:14pm
post #6 of 14

The base flattener/structure tool is pretty good. I don't have the ski sharp, but I remember reading some opinions on here that it didn't do as good of a job as diamond stones.

post #7 of 14
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post


If you mean this thing:

ski$20sharp$20top$20with$20labels$20gif.gif

I personally have no experience with it, but I believe it's an adjustable angle? Although I own such a thing, it is not the tool of choice FOR ME because I really don't trust the angle to be firmly locked in to the same spot every time. And I mean the SAME spot, not a hair (or a tenth of a hair) different than last time. Adjustable tools are nice for half a degree angles like a 2.5 if you're not sure you want to make a full degree change from 2 to 3 (yes, I know A-man, just do it..). And they're are nice for figuring out what an angle IS if you don't know, but once you know, you buy the fixed angle. The alternative is to buy a fixed angle with a shim set to give yourself variety for setting angles.

 

Yes, it is definitely an adjustable angle tool. That's also my worry, that the angle would not be firmly set and consistent all the time, so I wanted to see what everybody else's experience is. I do have the fixed angle tools and files already, however I liked the simplicity of this tool and the fact that it works the base edge at the same time as well. Thank you for your feedback.

post #8 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sushev View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post


If you mean this thing:

ski$20sharp$20top$20with$20labels$20gif.gif

I personally have no experience with it, but I believe it's an adjustable angle? Although I own such a thing, it is not the tool of choice FOR ME because I really don't trust the angle to be firmly locked in to the same spot every time. And I mean the SAME spot, not a hair (or a tenth of a hair) different than last time. Adjustable tools are nice for half a degree angles like a 2.5 if you're not sure you want to make a full degree change from 2 to 3 (yes, I know A-man, just do it..). And they're are nice for figuring out what an angle IS if you don't know, but once you know, you buy the fixed angle. The alternative is to buy a fixed angle with a shim set to give yourself variety for setting angles.

 

Yes, it is definitely an adjustable angle tool. That's also my worry, that the angle would not be firmly set and consistent all the time, so I wanted to see what everybody else's experience is. I do have the fixed angle tools and files already, however I liked the simplicity of this tool and the fact that it works the base edge at the same time as well. Thank you for your feedback.

 

I have the SkiSharp, and experience using it most of last season.   Upshot is that I like the stones, but the adjustable angles are a source of concern for exactly the reason @sibhusky gives:  "really close" is not close enough.   So I'm going to use the longer versions of the stones, in fixed-angle tools.   Other folks have reported that the ShiSharp is fragile if you drop it on a hard floor.  I've done that, it didn't shatter, your experience may be different.

post #9 of 14

I have one.  I prefer ordinary file guides when I have the skis on my bench.  I used the SkiSharpEdgeTuningTool (SSETT) when I'm on a multi-day trip and the skis need a touch up.  That said, I used this one day last winter and my skis got horrible.  Operator error, most likely.  I would not buy it again.  The FK Tools Edge Trick is all I really need when out on a trip.  It'll take a burr off the side, which is what I want, and I can use a hand stone on the bottom edge to remove a burr.  My ski tool box has a lot of stuff I no longer use....

post #10 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by joe strummer View Post

I interpret the base flatener to be like a wood plane for ski bases. Looks like hard work to me.

I have the base flattener. It isn't as much hard as it is tedious. Maintaining a flat base isn't that tedious. Getting the base flat can be. Depends how far from flat you are.

Anytime you put a hand/manual tool to work, when there is a power tool to do the job, it is going to take quite a bit longer than the power tool. It was a very sad day for me when I sold my backhoe and realized all I had left was a wheelbarrow and shovel.

The upside is the tool is made well. This is mostly due to the simple design. It does do the job and though it can be tedious, if you have issues getting what you want from a shop (I kept getting close but no cigar) or when you get what you want the price is shocking ( SkiMD does a fantastic job but I have 5 pairs of skis to maintain and would cost over $600/year). So I weigh in how long am I willing to work on my skis to net what I want and not have to pay $630 again. I can do a couple days of tedious for $600

To the OP, the flattening tools are well made though I'll admit the process to a newby can be intimidating at first. I'll also admit to sometimes using just the metal bar and not the tool itself. I just found that taking it out of the tool to sharpen annoying and I like to make sure the edges of the metal bar stay sharp. You can also create more work for yourself than you need to. This is also to folks new to it that might not be familiar with what they are really trying to achieve and what makes a ski good or bad.

Tool quality was pretty good. I'm on my second season using it and no issues.

Ken
post #11 of 14
Quote:
Originally Posted by sushev View Post

Hi guys!

I am looking for fellow skiers that are using those tools to tune their skis and can provide some feedback. I was able to find here in these forums threads on the Base Flattener and Structuring tool, but I am interested to hear from those using the entire SkiVisions system on a regular basis to tune their skis.
I already purchased the Base Flattner and Strusturing tool and watched all the videos of how to use all the tools, but would like hear from somebody that has the experience with the Edge Tuning tool and everything else.
Thank you in advance!
Stan


Alright.  I guess it time I chime in here.  Here is a ski vision for you.  This can also be supplemented with stones like these.  That's done wet.

BTW not all skis are perfectly flat.  They also don't need to be.  Some have shape.  The shape dictates how the ski handles.  As long as both skis are equal it's fine.


It gets deeper, but here you go.  This is a long video.  If you want to learn don't skip any portion at all.  The learning is in the chat.  Vision on.
 

post #12 of 14

I own the base flattener (stones and bar, not the one that takes a file) and the side edge sharpener.  I find the base flattener works pretty well. I alternate the stone and the metal bar and it takes down Ptex reasonably well. I find it doesn't take down the metal edges well at all.

 

The side/base sharpener I have not had good luck with. I actually think the angles are reasonably close. I did the adjustment to zero the tool. If you put a file blade in it, it cuts pretty well. When I put the stones in it, they are softer than the steel edge and groove very quickly. Once they groove, they ride on the base or ski side and stop working. That is the major problem I find, especially trying to sharpen the side edges.

 

I find  using diamond stones and edge guides works much better because the diamond stones are harder than the edge and do not groove. They consume less edge per sharpen. You don't want to file away the edge all the time or it won't last too long. Polishing it with the  diamondstones gets it really sharp without taking away a lot of metal. The ski vision stones grooved so quickly the edges weren't sharp before they stopped working.


Edited by bttocs - 1/9/16 at 7:00pm
post #13 of 14

The nature of polishing stones is to wear and to polish.  However the sharp edges of them can be used as a scraper.  Stick with diamond and files for the cutting.  Final polish with the stone.  Because they wear "groove" you need to use a new portion each time out.

post #14 of 14
Thread Starter 
Thank you guys for the feedback! :)That helps a lot. smile.gif
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