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Three words.

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

You are going in one direction (matters not if it is right or left), you want to go in the other direction. As I see it three thing are going to have to happen, an engagement, a release and a transfer. With these three things transfer,engagement and release we can accomplish the task of going in the other direction.

 

Now, my question is which of these three things, release, engagement, transfer, is more important or are they equal?  And, how important is the order of the words?

 

fom

post #2 of 16
R-T-E in that order. Equal importance.
post #3 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

R-T-E in that order. Equal importance.

 

About the T. If we break that down to transfer from foot to foot and transfer from one set of edges to the other what is the effect, importance of the order of the two kinds of transfer?

post #4 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

R-T-E in that order. Equal importance.

 

Except when we don't transfer during the transition, as in the White Pass, then it becomes R-E-T.

post #5 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

R-T-E in that order. Equal importance.

 

Except when we don't transfer during the transition, as in the White Pass, then it becomes R-E-T.

 

But you do transfer from one set of edges to the other you just stay on the LTE of the new inside foot and delay the transfer to the outside foot so does it become T-R-E-T, or R-T-E-T

 

edit: added last two words


Edited by fatoldman - 12/17/15 at 9:01am
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by skiatansky View Post

Except when we don't transfer during the transition, as in the White Pass, then it becomes R-E-T.

Was trying to keep it simple for our viewers at home! ;-)
post #7 of 16
R+T=E
R and T are on two different legs so they can actuall happen at the same time, thus the "+".
post #8 of 16
Do some dynamic Garlands - two garlands, then turn, two garlands, then turn. See for you self which works best.
post #9 of 16

I'd say the release happens first and the engagement and transfer start at the same time... ==> R/(ET) 
Once you release, you shift your weight from outside to outside ski (transfer) and you engage the new BTE/LTE. (Not saying the transfer and engagement end the same time, I'd say the transfer ends later!)
Why would the transfer come before the engagement?
And I do not understand how R and T could happen at the same time? I would say one releases in order to transfer weight, basically the goal of releasing is a quick shift in weight. The better you can release, the shorter the transfer.

post #10 of 16

In the context of our mass, R then E  there is no T    We intentionally Release our mass from the progressive building of centripetal (circular travel) force which automatically and passively returns it to the constant (inertial/straight travel) force of gravity. We then intentionally Engage the new turn and the process of progressively building centripetal force.  Only R and E are intentional,  it is akin to stick shifting.....you go from first gear to second by passing through neutral. 

 

The abruptness and technique of the Release is less impacting than the abruptness and technique of the Engagement. 

 

Just a different view of things. 

post #11 of 16

Wanna keep it real simple, just E. Just roll your skis to new edges and engage. Should carve you around.

post #12 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post

R-T-E in that order. Equal importance.

What he said. It cant happen in any other order. The 'T' may be quick, but its still a part of the equation. i dont think you can get to 'E' without it.

post #13 of 16

RET

 

It can happen in this order. Passive weight transfer.

post #14 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by graham418 View Post
 

What he said. It cant happen in any other order. The 'T' may be quick, but its still a part of the equation. i dont think you can get to 'E' without it.

 

Actually, it can happen in a different order (whitepass turn for example as mentioned above), but for the sake of simplification in the type of turn that would suit the majority of the skiing population, R-T-E is the best place to start and the easiest when understanding the significance of the three distinct movements. There aren't too many skiers who will benefit from intentional delaying transfer and pressure to the new outside ski anyway. 

post #15 of 16

RTE - active weight shift, classic Parallel Christie

RET - passive weight shift, in particular Carved OLR transition type turns

post #16 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
 

 

Actually, it can happen in a different order (whitepass turn for example as mentioned above), but for the sake of simplification in the type of turn that would suit the majority of the skiing population, R-T-E is the best place to start and the easiest when understanding the significance of the three distinct movements. There aren't too many skiers who will benefit from intentional delaying transfer and pressure to the new outside ski anyway. 

Good Point Greg,   If you go back and look at those who have contributed to this thread (including me) our inputs may have been influenced by our level of skills. 

 

In many sports, we gain higher levels of competence by making as many moves as possible instinctive.  But until we can ingrain those moves we deal with them as individual "components"  like   R-T-E.
 

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