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Family Lessons at Powder Mountain

post #1 of 6
Thread Starter 

We will arrive at Powder Mountain on Christmas day and I plan on getting my family a lesson.  We pre-purchased 3 days of tickets so are relieved to see it finally snowing.  This also restricts us from taking the first days at Snowbasin and getting lessons there.  i didn't want to start off beginners at Snowbasin, but will be going there later in the week (5 or 6 days of skiing planned).  It will be my wife, Daughter (19) and two sons (15 and 10) in the lesson.  They are all beginners with between 5 and 10 days of skiing each.  I was planning on a full day private lesson for them but was wondering if I would be better with a couple half-day lessons.  Perhaps a half day on the first day, then put them into group lessons another day if someone progresses faster or slower than the others?  Thoughts on strategy and recommendations for instructors (for the private lesson) please.  Thanks!

post #2 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by NWIski View Post
 

We will arrive at Powder Mountain on Christmas day and I plan on getting my family a lesson.  We pre-purchased 3 days of tickets so are relieved to see it finally snowing.  This also restricts us from taking the first days at Snowbasin and getting lessons there.  i didn't want to start off beginners at Snowbasin, but will be going there later in the week (5 or 6 days of skiing planned).  It will be my wife, Daughter (19) and two sons (15 and 10) in the lesson.  They are all beginners with between 5 and 10 days of skiing each.  I was planning on a full day private lesson for them but was wondering if I would be better with a couple half-day lessons.  Perhaps a half day on the first day, then put them into group lessons another day if someone progresses faster or slower than the others?  Thoughts on strategy and recommendations for instructors (for the private lesson) please.  Thanks!


Does everyone taking a lesson have about the same interest level?  Reason I ask is that my gut reaction is that perhaps having two half-day privates might be a good way to start.  Meaning mother and daughter separate from the boys.  Or a group lesson for mother and daughter, and only a private for the boys.  That's based on a guess that the boys may prefer to be on their own.  Obviously I don't know your family at all so just a suggestion to think about.

 

Half day lessons can work out better when having to adapt to higher altitude.

 

Paging @4ster .  He was an instructor at Snowbasin but also knows folks at PowMow.  Retired from full time teaching to do other stuff . . . like drive to Tahoe a few weeks when the snowstorms started dumping.

 

For future reference, Snowbasin is one of the ski resorts that uses terrain based instruction to get beginners going, as well as teaching skills for more advanced skiers.  It's a great place for lessons at any level.  I had a semi-private lesson there last season with a couple friends.  We are Level 7/8.  Used the terrain features every time we got back to the base before we loaded the Needles gondola.

post #3 of 6
Thread Starter 

Thanks for the input.  I don't think I need to separate the boys from my wife and daughter, at least to begin with.  My older boy is more reserved, and my daughter is adventurous for a young lady.  My wife has a few more days on the slopes than the others, so I think they are starting off at similar levels.  It is the first time skiing out west for the boys so they will have a little "wow" factor to deal with.

post #4 of 6

"For future reference, Snowbasin is one of the ski resorts that uses terrain based instruction to get beginners going, as well as teaching skills for more advanced skiers."

 

I googled "terrain based instruction" and found this explanation:

 

"Terrain Based Learning uses purpose-built snow features to help assist students by naturally controlling their speed when first learning to ski and snowboard. By reducing the effects of gravity (speed), students can focus on connecting with the movements, sensations and body positions needed to steer and control their equipment.  In short, Terrain Based Learning removes the traditional anxieties from learning and shifts the students' focus to moving, playing and having fun without fear of losing control." 

 

I can see how that would apply to beginners, but how does this translate to teaching advanced skiers?

post #5 of 6

Would the 10 year old have more fun, and maybe learn more, in a group with kids of a similar age?

 

I like half day lessons with the other half day to practice what I just learned.

post #6 of 6
Quote:
Originally Posted by ksampson3 View Post
 

"For future reference, Snowbasin is one of the ski resorts that uses terrain based instruction to get beginners going, as well as teaching skills for more advanced skiers."

 

I googled "terrain based instruction" and found this explanation:

 

"Terrain Based Learning uses purpose-built snow features to help assist students by naturally controlling their speed when first learning to ski and snowboard. By reducing the effects of gravity (speed), students can focus on connecting with the movements, sensations and body positions needed to steer and control their equipment.  In short, Terrain Based Learning removes the traditional anxieties from learning and shifts the students' focus to moving, playing and having fun without fear of losing control." 

 

I can see how that would apply to beginners, but how does this translate to teaching advanced skiers?


Missed this question . . .

 

There is a bit of a difference between "terrain based instruction" and Terrain Based Learning (TM).  As several instructors pointed out in a past thread, experienced instructors use available terrain when teaching skills all the time.  For example, I had an instructor show me how to use the uphill side of a cat track to practice side slips.  TBL is a specific element of what Snow Operating does to help ski areas/resorts to make the initial experience for first timers and novice skiers more fun.  My home mountain, Massanutten (tiny, northern VA), put in features in their training area last winter without working with Snow Operating.

 

As for how an instructor would use features for advanced skiers, I learned that first hand last season.  I set up a semi-private lesson with two of my friends.  We are Level 7/8.  The instructor is a PSIA Examiner and teaches at Snowbasin.  Every time we got back down to the base, he made use of the flat terrain and the TBL features.  What we did the most was 1-leg skiing.  One of my friends had never tried that before because he is mostly self-taught.  Took more than one pass on the flats for him to get it figured out.  Once we were okay on the flats, the instructor said something like "OK, now let's do that over the rollers."  Bottom line is that by the end of the 3-hr lesson, we could all at least pick up a ski while gliding over the rollers.  It was a lot easier to deal with the idea there than out on a green/blue groomer.

 

The Snowbasin website shows some of the features that can be set up: rollers, mini-pipe, banked turn.

https://www.snowbasin.com/lessons-rentals/tbl/

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