or Connect
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Servicing new (used) equipment
New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:

Servicing new (used) equipment

post #1 of 20
Thread Starter 

OK, so I just bought a bunch of equipment off craigslist for myself and my daughter - our first set of equipment.  I've skied for 20 years, but always off rental equipment as I never went enough or consistently but expect to do so now with my loving-it 7 year old (learned last year with about 8 or 9 days under her belt).  Since I never owned, I never really had responsibility for upkeep of skis, so don't really know terminology.

 

My skis are in very good condition.  They guy who sold them to me said his wife used them about 3 times before she switched to snowboarding.  No rust, doesn't look like it has any damage from rocks or what not, edge is apparently very good (did some rub with the back of the nail test something or other) and they have storage wax on it.  He said that I could just "ski-off" the wax on my first runs.  But the bindings are set for smaller length boots than I have.

 

So do I just take this into some ski shop and have them "tune" it, or otherwise, can I just watch some you tube tutorials and extend the boot settings myself?  And how about the DIN settings?

 

My daughter's skis are old and a tad rusty - but they are 1 season skis, right?  So do I take them in to the shop and have them tuned up (waxed, grinded, edge sharpened, whatever else?), along with getting the bindings set for her boots and DIN numbers?

 

I assume that no servicing is needed on the boots and poles, right?

 

Thanks!

post #2 of 20

Boots and poles are fine as is. You'll need to take your skis into the shop to get the bindings re-mounted and the releases tested. It would be a good idea to get your daughter's skis release tested as well. That isn't something that needs to be done often, but it's something that I like to do for any "new" skis + bindings, whether they're brand new from the shop or used gear from someone else.

 

The wax and edges are something that you can take care of yourself, as long as you have some sort of workspace and some self-confidence in your hands. At the very least you'll need an old iron that you don't mind destroying, plastic wax scraper, ski wax, some edge guides and diamond stones, and a file.

 

Before doing anything else you need to scrape all the storage wax off those skis, using a dedicated wax scraper or some piece of plastic with a good, sharp edge. After you've done that, brush the base with a stiff nylon brush until you don't see anymore dust. Then you can go skiing!

 

When the edges get dull, sharpen them. If you don't know the angles that are already on there, use the file on the edge guide to cut a new edge on the base and side (1 and 2, respectively, is a good start). If you already know the angles, skip to polishing with the diamond stones. Then, using the same guide, polish the edges with diamond stones, going from coarse to fine stones. Keep the file and stones lubricated -- I just use water with a small amount of dish soap. After you've set the angle on the base once, you shouldn't ever touch it again. After you're done tuning, run a hard Arkansas stone along the base edge to remove the burr, and you're good to go. If you don't want to buy a stone, you can ski without removing the burr, but the skis will ride funny for a bit until the snow wears the burr off.

 

Plenty of online tutorials for this stuff if you're more of a visual learner, and I'm sure others will chime in as well. The tuning forum on here is a great resource. But a quick heads-up: the posters there tend to be a lot more perfectionist about their ski tuning, so they'll tell you to spend a lot more money and time on tuning and tools. For me (and many others, I assume), good enough is good enough, and I can't be bothered to buy a ski iron and really expensive wax (I just use the unlabeled shop wax from the local ski shop), but I still manage to make my skis work. I really do enjoy tuning my own skis, and I recommend it to all skiers.

post #3 of 20

I suggest you take a look at the forum for Tuning, Maintenance & Repairs if you are interested in learning a bit about the basics.  If you are lucky, your kid will think waxing skis is fun.  That worked for me for a few years when my daughter was a tween.  I prefer to let a shop take care of the edges.  Given where I normally ski, that doesn't need to be done that often in any case.  Perhaps 2-3 times a season.

 

Please do not try to re-set the bindings yourself.  It's not that hard, but if done incorrectly that's an invitation to a knee injury or worse if a binding does not release as it should during a fall.

 

Hopefully all you need is a minor adjustment to get the binding set up for your boots, not a complete remount.

 

You may find the info in a SkiDiva thread about taking care of gear useful.  Mentions what to do for boots at the end of a ski day.

http://www.theskidiva.com/forums/index.php?threads/what-you-need-to-know-about-gear-care-and-tuning.2186/

post #4 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljc00 View Post
 

OK, so I just bought a bunch of equipment off craigslist for myself and my daughter - our first set of equipment.  I've skied for 20 years, but always off rental equipment as I never went enough or consistently but expect to do so now with my loving-it 7 year old (learned last year with about 8 or 9 days under her belt).  Since I never owned, I never really had responsibility for upkeep of skis, so don't really know terminology.

 

My skis are in very good condition.  They guy who sold them to me said his wife used them about 3 times before she switched to snowboarding.  No rust, doesn't look like it has any damage from rocks or what not, edge is apparently very good (did some rub with the back of the nail test something or other) and they have storage wax on it.  He said that I could just "ski-off" the wax on my first runs.  But the bindings are set for smaller length boots than I have.

 

So do I just take this into some ski shop and have them "tune" it, or otherwise, can I just watch some you tube tutorials and extend the boot settings myself?  And how about the DIN settings?

 

My daughter's skis are old and a tad rusty - but they are 1 season skis, right?  So do I take them in to the shop and have them tuned up (waxed, grinded, edge sharpened, whatever else?), along with getting the bindings set for her boots and DIN numbers?

 

I assume that no servicing is needed on the boots and poles, right?

 

Thanks!

Correct, Boots and poles should be good to go. Do have a look at the heels and toes of boots for excessive wear. That would be the only hang up for boots. Bring both pair of skis and one of each of your boots to a shop and have them tuned and bindings tested. That will get your season started. Take time through the season and gain some knowledge on how to maintain your gear. www.tognar.com has the tools you will need. If you are nervous to do work to your new skis, you can pick up a pair at Goodwill or a garage sale for almost nothing. Practice on those instead.

post #5 of 20
The poles should be lubed and straightened, also have the grips re-torqued, just to be safe. Most people overlook this crucial service. The boots are probably ready for fresh batteries but check the code readout first.
post #6 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance View Post

The poles should be lubed and straightened, also have the grips re-torqued, just to be safe. Most people overlook this crucial service.


you forgot to mention filling the scratches on the boots with Ptex...:popcorn

post #7 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by FatChance View Post

The poles should be lubed and straightened, also have the grips re-torqued, just to be safe. Most people overlook this crucial service. The boots are probably ready for fresh batteries but check the code readout first.


Wait . . . I thought that's for golf clubs? ;)

post #8 of 20
Thread Starter 

OK, so I think you guys are joking, right??  The P-tex thing is that black layer on the bottom of skis, right?  I know poles dont need to be lubed, and I'm pretty sure that you dont straighten them because they are probably broken if they arent straight.  (Shows you what I know, and dont know.)  

 

I bet you work in ski shops and have some sort of running inside joke about this :-)

 

OK but seriously, is that I should be looking for with my equipment "binding adjustment and torque test" and how much should that run me (in Nor Cal, where a basic tune runs $40, and everything is equally inflated?)

post #9 of 20
Buy a helmet for both of you.
post #10 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljc00 View Post
 

OK, so I think you guys are joking, right??  The P-tex thing is that black layer on the bottom of skis, right?  I know poles dont need to be lubed, and I'm pretty sure that you dont straighten them because they are probably broken if they arent straight.  (Shows you what I know, and dont know.)  

 

I bet you work in ski shops and have some sort of running inside joke about this :-)

 

OK but seriously, is that I should be looking for with my equipment "binding adjustment and torque test" and how much should that run me (in Nor Cal, where a basic tune runs $40, and everything is equally inflated?)


Unless you're truly fired to do your own tuning, I'd take both pairs of skis (and boots) to the shop.  You'll need to have them remount your bindings in any case, and release test both sets, so having the shop tune them will be much easier than doing the research and collecting the equipment necessary to do that work yourself.  You're a westerner, right?  If so, you'll be fine with a 1 (base) / 2 (side edge) tune. If you have the shop do it, you'll get on snow earlier and enjoy the great season you're getting.

 

But tuning is fun and money-saving (theoretically), so between trips to the mountains you can research and buy tuning equipment.  Good luck!

post #11 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljc00 View Post
 

OK, so I think you guys are joking, right??  The P-tex thing is that black layer on the bottom of skis, right?  I know poles dont need to be lubed, and I'm pretty sure that you dont straighten them because they are probably broken if they arent straight.  (Shows you what I know, and dont know.)  

 

I bet you work in ski shops and have some sort of running inside joke about this :-)

 

OK but seriously, is that I should be looking for with my equipment "binding adjustment and torque test" and how much should that run me (in Nor Cal, where a basic tune runs $40, and everything is equally inflated?)


Yep, the guys were joking around.

 

I got curious.  Turns out that P-Tex was originally a brand name for the polyethylene created by the European company International Mountain Sport.  At least that's what I found on one website.  Now gets used generically for the base material.  What most people mean when they talk about P-Tex (spelling varies a lot) is the material used to fill a big gouge in the base of a ski.  Usually more of a problem for skiers who are in the woods or wandering around rocks.

 

​As for bent poles, when they don't break there are folks who will use them after straightening them out.

 

Seems like the cost for a binding adjustment and torque test was $15-25 around Lake Placid, NY, a resort town near Whiteface.

post #12 of 20
Thread Starter 

Remount bindings - does that mean they take the whole thing off and drill out new holes and all, or just take off that back part and set it to size (that's what one you tube video showed)  I'll probably just take them to the shop for tuning for now until I start to become more familiar with all that they do and what the skis need and dont need.  I've never bothered to pay attention before.

 

And, yes, we both have helmets - thought I am sensing there's sarcasm in that post ;-)

post #13 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljc00 View Post
 

Remount bindings - does that mean they take the whole thing off and drill out new holes and all, or just take off that back part and set it to size (that's what one you tube video showed)  I'll probably just take them to the shop for tuning for now until I start to become more familiar with all that they do and what the skis need and dont need.  I've never bothered to pay attention before.

 

And, yes, we both have helmets - thought I am sensing there's sarcasm in that post ;-)


Note that there is some adjustment possible without remounting bindings.  I think I've seen something like 10mm.  There are also bindings called "demo bindings" that are designed to allow a wide range of boot lengths.  One advantage of demo bindings is that makes skis easier to sell later on.

 

Do you know what BSL stands for?  The Boot Sole Length is stamped on your boots somewhere.  Usually in the 200s.  For instance, my BSL is 275.  I was skiing with my niece over Thanksgiving and she just got her first pair of boots, which were BSL 273.  I let her use my extra skis since we are about the same size.  A small adjustment was needed to properly fit the binding.  Plus her DIN setting was different.

 

Changing the DIN is easy from a mechanical standpoint.

 

When I buy skis used from an individual who posts on a ski forum, I'll ask if the binding can handle my BSL before making a decision about making the purchase.

post #14 of 20
Really. Well since you asked.
post #15 of 20
Thread Starter 

My bindings are Marker mod 11.0 (I think).  The skis are K2 Burnin Luv.  It looks like they came as a set since they seem to match in red-orange-yellow design.  Here are some pics of them

 

 

 

post #16 of 20
A quick look on the internet indicates the Burnin Luvs have metal in the top sheet. This means that if you re mount yourself ( I'm not suggesting you do though) you will need to tap holes after drilling.
From the images, it looks like you have some rearward adjustment available. They are integrated/on rails so you might be in luck as far as adjustment goes.
post #17 of 20
Those skis are not flat, they use a system binding. No drilling needed.
post #18 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljc00 View Post
 

My bindings are Marker mod 11.0 (I think).  The skis are K2 Burnin Luv.  It looks like they came as a set since they seem to match in red-orange-yellow design.  Here are some pics of them

[snip pics]

As already mentioned, the bindings are "system bindings," also known as "integrated bindings."  Like "demo bindings" that means it's easy to adjust the bindings for different BSLs without re-drilling.

 

I had the K2 OneLuv for a few years when I was an intermediate skiing with my daughter as she was learning to ski.  Also a system binding.  Only downside was that the skis were relatively heavy to carry from the parking lot.

 

It should not take long for a tech to make the necessary adjustments and tests to set up the skis for your boots with the proper DIN setting.  But worth calling in advance to see how long you need to leave the skis (and a boot), or if it's possible to go during a less busy time and just wait for them.

 

When you are in the ski shop, might ask someone to show you what regular bindings look like for future reference.  Some skis are only sold with system bindings (more common for beginners/intermediates), some are sold with or without system bindings, some are only sold "flat" meaning without any binding.  I recently bought the Head Absolut Joy, which are sold with a system binding but the binding was not pre-installed.  So I took the skis to my local ski shop to have the bindings installed, set up, and tested.

 

@skiessentials recently posted this video of a mounting session.  Straightforward for people who know what they are doing and have the appropriate tools and set up.

 

post #19 of 20
Mounting jigs. Luxury.
post #20 of 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by lljc00 View Post
 

OK, so I think you guys are joking, right??  The P-tex thing is that black layer on the bottom of skis, right?  I know poles dont need to be lubed, and I'm pretty sure that you dont straighten them because they are probably broken if they arent straight.  (Shows you what I know, and dont know.)

 

I bet you work in ski shops and have some sort of running inside joke about this :-)

 

OK but seriously, is that I should be looking for with my equipment "binding adjustment and torque test" and how much should that run me (in Nor Cal, where a basic tune runs $40, and everything is equally inflated?)

I checked in the Bay Area and tunes are running $40-$50 per pair, binding test runs about $18 per pair. The shop guys will know what to do.

New Posts  All Forums:Forum Nav:
  Return Home
  Back to Forum: Ski Gear Discussion
EpicSki › The Barking Bear Forums › On the Snow (Skiing Forums) › Ski Gear Discussion › Servicing new (used) equipment