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Ontario Conditions December 2015

post #1 of 12
Thread Starter 

I live in Onterrible(Ontario) and its been a very dismal start to the season so far. With high temperatures for the season there hasn't been much snow making or snowfall at any of the resorts. The snow that has fallen or been made has melted with the typical freeze thaw cycles that have become the normal here. I know there aren't many Ontario skiers but of the few that are or if you are experiencing similar weather patterns. What are your plans for this winter? Pray for snow? Ski somewhere else? I am considering driving out to Quebec or Vermont as the warm temps in Ontario could have the season on a hold for a few weeks.

post #2 of 12

dude, its ontario in december, your description sounds like every month of every year, buy a flight on westjet go west and ski

post #3 of 12
Thread Starter 

A trip out west is pretty expensive, I will be able to later in the season but not now. I am also working as instructor in Ontario this season so I will have limited time off. At this time last year there was snow and temperatures sufficient for snow making.

post #4 of 12

The reality is, we had two abnormally cold winters in a row.  This year is more typical I'd say.  I haven't abandoned hopes but it's definitely going to be a while yet before snow here is good.  I have a newborn so I'm pretty much going nowhere. :D  *IF* I were to be able to go anywhere on a limited time/budget trip, I'd be flying out of Buffalo and slumming it in Lake Louise or Utah.  5 days skiing out west is worth 50 here.  YMMV.. 

post #5 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Scott43 View Post
 

The reality is, we had two abnormally cold winters in a row.  This year is more typical I'd say.  I haven't abandoned hopes but it's definitely going to be a while yet before snow here is good.  I have a newborn so I'm pretty much going nowhere. :D  *IF* I were to be able to go anywhere on a limited time/budget trip, I'd be flying out of Buffalo and slumming it in Lake Louise or Utah.  5 days skiing out west is worth 50 here.  YMMV.. 

This makes a lot of sense to me now, I have just been getting back into the sport more over the past 3 years. The last 2 seasons were great to me even with the mixed conditions. Last season especially I ski'd many days at Blue and it had light fluffy powder(as long as you know where to find the powder stashes). I would find myself knee deep in the trees many times and I do have to say those were definitely my best days skiing.

 

From the sounds of it the best thing for me to do is to save up and get a trip out west. The vertical and terrain would be worth it, especially if I'm skiing lots of powder. Has anyone ski'd Le Massif or Jay Peak I hear for Eastern "mountains" they are pretty decent. They would be about an 8hr drive  Both have good glades as well, I know Blue Mountain is officially opening more of their gladed terrain, in the past it was technically out of bounds. I have never ski'd out of the province so any terrain with more variety than Blue would be appealing to me. 

post #6 of 12

Le Massif, Mont Sainte Anne, Jay Peak are all great areas with challenging terrain and over 2000' vertical drop.  Jay has tons of marked glades, unmarked tree skiing and side country skiing as well.  Problem is, so many people are now skiing those trees that the powder does not last nearly as long is it did just a few years ago.  I like the glades at Le Massif better than Ste. Anne and, in my experience, Massif usually has more snow than Ste. Anne.  Also, Le Massif has what they call a side country or back country area.  It is really a pod of 2 or 3 glades that are about a 20 minute hike along the ridge. THe powder definitely last longer there because of the effort required to reach it. The woods there seemed to be way to thick and trees too close together to just go exploring.  If I know the general geography of an area I will sometimes just follow some trecks into the trees.  3 days after a storm there were no tracks into the trees to follow at Le Massif... they were just too tight to ski.  Ste. Anne has a dedicated area of glades that are nicely pitched but get skied out fairly quickly.  I have not skied there enough to really explore other tree skiing options.

 

The problem is that all of them are in the east where we may eventually get some snow and are probably not worth the drive unless there is a good storm on top of a good base.  And that is what we are all hoping for.

post #7 of 12
And they're killing it out west with snow this year. Vermont is OK, not really dumping on them, just a bad early season so far.
post #8 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
 

Le Massif, Mont Sainte Anne, Jay Peak are all great areas with challenging terrain and over 2000' vertical drop.  Jay has tons of marked glades, unmarked tree skiing and side country skiing as well.  Problem is, so many people are now skiing those trees that the powder does not last nearly as long is it did just a few years ago.  I like the glades at Le Massif better than Ste. Anne and, in my experience, Massif usually has more snow than Ste. Anne.  Also, Le Massif has what they call a side country or back country area.  It is really a pod of 2 or 3 glades that are about a 20 minute hike along the ridge. THe powder definitely last longer there because of the effort required to reach it. The woods there seemed to be way to thick and trees too close together to just go exploring.  If I know the general geography of an area I will sometimes just follow some trecks into the trees.  3 days after a storm there were no tracks into the trees to follow at Le Massif... they were just too tight to ski.  Ste. Anne has a dedicated area of glades that are nicely pitched but get skied out fairly quickly.  I have not skied there enough to really explore other tree skiing options.

 

The problem is that all of them are in the east where we may eventually get some snow and are probably not worth the drive unless there is a good storm on top of a good base.  And that is what we are all hoping for.

I have heard many great things about Le Massif and Jay Peak, I know that Jay Peak has gotten more popular especially since they have added the waterpark. Mont St Anne I do not know much about but I will look into the terrain. I enjoy skiing glades regardless of conditions I do enjoy the added difficulty and challenge of technical terrain. I consider training for Chamonix which is my ultimate goal to ski in the future. I'll wait till January - February to really decide which area to go based on thick the base is in each area. 

Has anyone ski'd at Smugglers Notch or Smuggs, they have a triple black diamond called the Black Hole it seems like it would be really challenging this may end up being where I decide to go once there is some decent coverage. I don't mind skiing tightly spaced trees as long as there is somewhere to scrub speed in between. Once I get comfortable enough with the ski area I will seek out fun little routes off trail. As long as I know I can get back to a lift with gravity. The glades in the Orchard are pretty fun, not super steep but a decent pitch with plenty of variety.

post #9 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LIFEonHIerHihts View Post
 

I have heard many great things about Le Massif and Jay Peak, I know that Jay Peak has gotten more popular especially since they have added the waterpark. Mont St Anne I do not know much about but I will look into the terrain. I enjoy skiing glades regardless of conditions I do enjoy the added difficulty and challenge of technical terrain. I consider training for Chamonix which is my ultimate goal to ski in the future. I'll wait till January - February to really decide which area to go based on thick the base is in each area. 

Has anyone ski'd at Smugglers Notch or Smuggs, they have a triple black diamond called the Black Hole it seems like it would be really challenging this may end up being where I decide to go once there is some decent coverage. I don't mind skiing tightly spaced trees as long as there is somewhere to scrub speed in between. Once I get comfortable enough with the ski area I will seek out fun little routes off trail. As long as I know I can get back to a lift with gravity. The glades in the Orchard are pretty fun, not super steep but a decent pitch with plenty of variety.


Smuggs and Jay Peak make a good combo on a three or four day ski trip because they are not too far apart.  Same for Le Massif and MSA in a different direction.  All four have significant tree skiing.  If you stay in CA due to the strong dollar the overall scale of skiing isn't that different between the four mtns, they are all pretty dang good and in decent snow conditions a fine alternative to getting in a plane to go West.

post #10 of 12

Smuggs is one of my favorites.  I only have 3 days there but really like it.  It has a lot of challenging terrain, some very challenging and tons of tree skiing as well as some side country that I have yet to explore.  I have not skied their triple black, from what I understand it is steep tight trees.

 

Chamonix is awesome!

post #11 of 12
Quote:
Originally Posted by LIFEonHIerHihts View Post
 

A trip out west is pretty expensive, I will be able to later in the season but not now. I am also working as instructor in Ontario this season so I will have limited time off. At this time last year there was snow and temperatures sufficient for snow making.

move west and instruct here

 

also anyone in the USA your entire ski season could be 25-35% off, lift tickets, hotels, gear and meals

come on up, avoid Whistler and enjoy yourself

post #12 of 12
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
 

Smuggs is one of my favorites.  I only have 3 days there but really like it.  It has a lot of challenging terrain, some very challenging and tons of tree skiing as well as some side country that I have yet to explore.  I have not skied their triple black, from what I understand it is steep tight trees.

 

Chamonix is awesome!

I have seen some videos on Youtube and it claims a pitch of around 50 degrees as well as the tight trees. It doesn't appear that they do any maintenance on branches, so its looks like a lot of smacking trees out from in front your face. Chamonix is definitely awesome, to ski from the Aiguille Du Midi to the bottom is top of my list. 

Quote:
Originally Posted by waxman View Post
 

move west and instruct here

 

also anyone in the USA your entire ski season could be 25-35% off, lift tickets, hotels, gear and meals

come on up, avoid Whistler and enjoy yourself

That is my goal for next year, I am level 1 with the CSIA currently and this season I would like to get my level 2. It will let the resorts out west know I am serious and interested in skiing. As well as securing a better rate of a pay and being a more skilled instructor with a higher level should increase my chances of getting a job out there. Ideally I would like to get my level 4 eventually, I know it will take a lot of work and dedication. I enjoy skiing a lot and any way I can make it happen so that I get as many days possible per year. With the higher level I would consider teaching in Japan or Europe for a season.

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