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Favorite drill to increase angles - Page 13

post #361 of 368
 

Originally Posted by utahsaint View Post

 

 

This may only hold relevance with skiers of a certain generation, but Phil's position in this video cover photo posted up the thread reminds me of a gracefully sweeping element embedded in the slalom turns of Stenmark and the likes of that time that have been replaced by the harshness of slashing efficiency demonstrated by Hirscher and the like. Don't get me wrong. I do appreciate the light touches within the grace of power from today's racers. However, once a hallmark of a great slalom skier, grace as a racing characteristic seems to have taken a back seat to the other characteristics that solely drive the bottom dollar. Watching Phil in this video, you can see how he gracefully harnesses the sweeping motion of the turn that starts at the clearing of the gate and carries the him across the falline all the while producing a visible sensation of the suspension of gravity until he needs to pressure his ski once again. Absolutely freakin marvelous! Thankfully, for recreational skiers who have reached a certain level, they need not mimic the reserved dispassion emanating from such supreme efficiency of today's racers and promoting ski racing more as a soulfully vapid science rather than the form of art it once resembled. The more we progress, the more we leave behind.

post #362 of 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich666 View Post
 

 

This may only hold relevance with skiers of a certain generation, but Phil's position in this video cover photo posted up the thread reminds me of a gracefully sweeping element embedded in the slalom turns of Stenmark and the likes of that time that have been replaced by the harshness of slashing efficiency demonstrated by Hirscher and the like. Don't get me wrong. I do appreciate the light touches within the grace of power from today's racers. However, once a hallmark of a great slalom skier, grace as a racing characteristic seems to have taken a back seat to the other characteristics that solely drive the bottom dollar. Watching Phil in this video, you can see how he gracefully harnesses the sweeping motion of the turn that starts at the clearing of the gate and carries the him across the falline all the while producing a visible sensation of the suspension of gravity until he needs to pressure his ski once again. Absolutely freakin marvelous! Thankfully, for recreational skiers who have reached a certain level, they need not mimic the reserved dispassion emanating from such supreme efficiency of today's racers and promoting ski racing more as a soulfully vapid science rather than the form of art it once resembled. The more we progress, the more we leave behind.

 

  Personally I have admiration for both generations.  They did a lot back then with the equipment they where given.  Unfortunately I tend to agree with you that in today's world everyone is driven by the bottom dollar.  That however doesn't mean I don't admire great athletes of this generation.  I have a lot admiration for athletes in professional skiing or even in the free skiing world.  There was a thread on here titled who is the best skier.  I couldn't pick one or two if my life depended on me.  People that can free ride and throw themselves down huge cliffs are as awe inspiring as a world cup racer, or as amazing as those who do freestyle.  All very different skills that take time, grace and power.  Really the entire sport is evolving, and I see great line choices in today's racers.  So I don't know that we left behind things, or evolved.  I mean look at how much energy was wasted rising, lifting a ski, sinking into it to try to carve it.  All of this has evolved to a shape of ski that allows huge angels which are so inspiring people want to mimic that...  So no I don't think we left behind much and the irony is people are still trying to mimic world cup racers.  So something that is happening in the sport must be right to create that following.

post #363 of 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by utahsaint View Post
 

 

  Personally I have admiration for both generations.  They did a lot back then with the equipment they where given.  Unfortunately I tend to agree with you that in today's world everyone is driven by the bottom dollar.  That however doesn't mean I don't admire great athletes of this generation.  I have a lot admiration for athletes in professional skiing or even in the free skiing world.  There was a thread on here titled who is the best skier.  I couldn't pick one or two if my life depended on me.  People that can free ride and throw themselves down huge cliffs are as awe inspiring as a world cup racer, or as amazing as those who do freestyle.  All very different skills that take time, grace and power.  Really the entire sport is evolving, and I see great line choices in today's racers.  So I don't know that we left behind things, or evolved.  I mean look at how much energy was wasted rising, lifting a ski, sinking into it to try to carve it.  All of this has evolved to a shape of ski that allows huge angels which are so inspiring people want to mimic that...  So no I don't think we left behind much and the irony is people are still trying to mimic world cup racers.  So something that is happening in the sport must be right to create that following.

I'm always amazed when I go back and watch world cup tapes from pre shaped skis.   How poorly the skis came around compared to today.  I attended several WC races in the 80's and early 90's and used to follow these guys and gals around the mountain when they were out free skiing.  It was tough to match them turn for turn .  I saw  Tomba race  couple times and he was like a rocket in the gates.  Those guys were probably only carving the last 10-20% in most turns and we thought they were pretty great.   I love the new technology and I think just about everyone else does too.   I remember when the snow boarders started carving turns in the mid 90's and we were still on the old technology.  I for one was envious.    YM

post #364 of 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by yogaman View Post
 

I'm always amazed when I go back and watch world cup tapes from pre shaped skis.   How poorly the skis came around compared to today.  I attended several WC races in the 80's and early 90's and used to follow these guys and gals around the mountain when they were out free skiing.  It was tough to match them turn for turn .  I saw  Tomba race  couple times and he was like a rocket in the gates.  Those guys were probably only carving the last 10-20% in most turns and we thought they were pretty great.   I love the new technology and I think just about everyone else does too.   I remember when the snow boarders started carving turns in the mid 90's and we were still on the old technology.  I for one was envious.    YM

The interesting thing today is that  the fundamentals haven't changed.  Edge first, balance on the outside ski, stand on the sweet spot and stay a little countered.  YM

post #365 of 368

I remember emulating the DH racers in the late 1970s.  What's changed most for me is that now I can carve clean curves at smaller turn radii and lower speeds, and that has really made the transitions more critical and interesting (and more fun).

post #366 of 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by utahsaint View Post
 

 

  Personally I have admiration for both generations.  They did a lot back then with the equipment they where given.  Unfortunately I tend to agree with you that in today's world everyone is driven by the bottom dollar.  That however doesn't mean I don't admire great athletes of this generation.  I have a lot admiration for athletes in professional skiing or even in the free skiing world.  There was a thread on here titled who is the best skier.  I couldn't pick one or two if my life depended on me.  People that can free ride and throw themselves down huge cliffs are as awe inspiring as a world cup racer, or as amazing as those who do freestyle.  All very different skills that take time, grace and power.  Really the entire sport is evolving, and I see great line choices in today's racers.  So I don't know that we left behind things, or evolved.  I mean look at how much energy was wasted rising, lifting a ski, sinking into it to try to carve it.  All of this has evolved to a shape of ski that allows huge angels which are so inspiring people want to mimic that...  So no I don't think we left behind much and the irony is people are still trying to mimic world cup racers.  So something that is happening in the sport must be right to create that following.

 

Yes, U.St, to the amazingness of all the other snow sport disciplines, all of which I have an appreciation for that stems from my love of skiing. Most noted is the Chinese Downhill, a sport that was documented in the 80's movie "Hot Dog" and, more seriously, the discipline of the Skier Cross. Like I said, don't get me wrong in terms of appreciating the aesthetics of today's skiers/racers more so as opposed to those of the past. I guess I may have been reminiscing a classic style more than anything else. I do not feel that anything that no longer exists in technique today is worth anything at all today. I guess you could equate it to the appreciation of a classic car. While you wouldn't mind having one in your garage, it is going to be the 16' Beemer your driving 98% of the time.

 

Yes, it was much more work to make turns back then, which required an active leg independence that, in a way, produced a certain dynamic articulation of the legs that had been so soothing to feel (once you found it), you couldn't get enough. Now, we steer our entire lower body like it is one big leg back and forth down the hill. More efficient? Yes!,  More dynamic? Yes!,  Faster? Yes!,  More on edge? Yes!,  More exciting? Yes!,  More Heaven and God-like? Yes!  

 

Edit: Scratch that last one. I meant to say "More Hell and Devil-like? Yes!


Edited by Rich666 - 1/17/16 at 6:40am
post #367 of 368
Quote:
Originally Posted by borntoski683 View Post
 

Then most likely the inside leg is getting in the way and it needs to be cleared out of the way more effectively by pulling the inside knee up and out of the way.  That's it.  If they aren't able to actually generate the angles for any other reason..I'd say they don't own the movements...  Start with footwork and go from there and there are many moving parts...as stated before.

 

 

I'm liking this tip.

post #368 of 368

I think my favorite drill and concept lately is to think of skiing like walking.  It came from JF Beaulieu on his project kitz video.  Basically his drill is slow motion walking, when you apply that to skiing wow.  It all falls into place angles, balance, arm movement it all seems to work together.  I don't feel out of balance and am getting more of the angles I am looking for.  My latest icon image comes from some video I shot after doing this exercise.  Granted I am not getting as large of angles I as would like but its much better.  Here it is in larger form:
Getting used to my Rossignol Hero skis, now if I could only do this in a course every time...
 

And a video for inspiration from JF Beaulieu

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