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What's your COLDEST ever ski experience? - Page 4

post #91 of 182

Quote:

Originally Posted by midwestfabs View Post

Getting ready for ski class circa jan 2015 at afton alps, minny...somehere in the range of -25 with wc somwhere in the insanely range of -35+...my girls rock by the way biggrin.gif


 

I remember at Cannon (the source of my 29 below day that I mentioned earlier in this thread) they had employees at the lodge doors and they wouldn't let you out to ride the lifts if any skin was showing.  I guess they couldn't actually prevent you from skiing, but it seemed like a smart move on their part.

 

I belong to a night race league at a small hill (about 250 vertical) here in eastern Massachusetts.  I guess Nashoba Valley is about the size of some mid-western hills?  At any rate, we get some pretty chilly nights; low single digits above or below.  With the 20 second runs down and the slow lift back up -- I can never get enough movement going to actually feel warm.  Those nights are "thermometer warmer", but actually feel colder in a way than the "stupid cold" temps the mountains in northern New England experience.  At least when you have 2,000 vertical to work with you can sort-of feel warm as you get back on the lift.

 

You Minnesota types posting these ridiculous cold temps that you experience -- you've got my respect.  Thumbs Up

post #92 of 182
Well for what it is worth, folks are still paddle boarding in minny.

this am it started with thunder, followed by torrential rains, then sleet, topped with a snow/rain mix, coated with big fat fluffy snow flakes, and finished off with some very nice bright sushinee...all in about ~2 hours confused.gif

post #93 of 182

Coldest feeling: Stowe, -14F with 30+ mph wind, to end the day.

Coldest: Jay Peak, -24F, but calm, to start the next day.

post #94 of 182

Loaded two consecutive lifts the other day at Loveland without a bump. That s***'s pretty cold.

post #95 of 182

-35 with windchill up at Tremblant during January. So cold I had trouble breathing and I could only ski for an hour. Got back to the condo and had to walk shirtless into the hottub 5 feet outside. Cold as fuck!

post #96 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by tank8681 View Post
 

-35 with windchill up at Tremblant during January. So cold I had trouble breathing and I could only ski for an hour. Got back to the condo and had to walk shirtless into the hottub 5 feet outside. Cold as fuck!

 

 

And that's a warm day at Tremblant.

post #97 of 182

As a rec skier I never wanted to go out below 0. As a racer it got wicked cold on numerous occasions, as a coach it was cold all the time, below 0, with the wind, we're bundled up just standing on the hill planting wickets and changing courses as fast as we can get back up the hill just to stay warm lol

 

Miss those days

post #98 of 182

-34f, severe clear and not a breath of wind. 

Aspen Highlands back when Whip still owned it.  Steeple Chase was opening for the first time that year. 

It took four old lifts back then just to get up to Loge and they kept breaking down.  I only had one run by noon and I was freezing my butt off.

That was probably the last time I skied Highland's under Whips ownership.  

ASC taking over was the best thing that ever happend to Highlands.

That and Mack Smith.

post #99 of 182


I remember days like that on Highlands. I played ski bum there from 80-83. I'm thinking you preceded me by a few years. Steeplechase was open but not very well defined yet. To the best of my knowledge my last year there was the first year they allowed a select few to do highlands bowl. You had to do a ski test with the patrol and almost everyone failed the test..

post #100 of 182

No, that was the era.  I volunteer patrolled at Highland's 81-83,  until they increased the number of days for a pass,  from one day a week, to two.

I always like Mack and Highland's patrol had a really tight crew, but the ski area infrastructure was falling apart under Whip.

I already had a full comp for the Aspen Skico mountains and I didn't really get any benefit from the Highlands pass. I just didn't want to volunteer two days/week.

Plus, it didn't look like they were going to hire any additional full timers for some time, so I quit.

 

Next season, Tom, Chris and Craig were killed in the bowl avalanche and they hired, Pinto and Kenny.

 

That was the Star Test and they only did 2-3 bowl tours,  before the avalanche.

post #101 of 182

Mt. Baldy, just outside of LA.  I think it might have once gotten down to 40F.   Some skiers reported seeing an actual cloud.  Fortunately ski patrol managed to get all of us inside to shelter.  

 

 

post #102 of 182


I used to hang out with the guys who ran the restaurant on the mtn. also was pretty good friends with Les who was the lift operator who lived in the lift shack right by the restaurant. Probably my favorite times I ever had was getting up there on full moons and we would go to the top on the groomers in exchange for steak dinners.

post #103 of 182
Yeah, the RFV's a special place, worts an all.
It's relatively temperate, as far as ski resorts go and I never miss a day because of weather.
The Gondi 's nice, on those cold days!
post #104 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post

-34f, severe clear and not a breath of wind. 
Aspen Highlands back when Whip still owned it.  Steeple Chase was opening for the first time that year. 
It took four old lifts back then just to get up to Loge and they kept breaking down.  I only had one run by noon and I was freezing my butt off.
That was probably the last time I skied Highland's under Whips ownership.  
ASC taking over was the best thing that ever happend to Highlands.
That and Mack Smith.

That day sounds quite familiar. I managed the ski shop at the base back in that time and remember that week well because it was so cold. Cold enough to kill pine beetles. We went skiing, mostly for the novelty, and because we had Alf Engen Black!

Those of you who know that reference are now outed as old.

Riding up the chair wasn't that bad because you weren't moving very fast, but as soon as you started sliding, it was cold. Couldn't get back down fast enough.

Yep, that was cold, not like today, no sir.

jl
post #105 of 182
Quote:Originally Posted by chemist View Post
 

"Mt. Baldy, just outside of LA.  I think it might have once gotten down to 40F.   Some skiers reported seeing an actual cloud.  Fortunately ski patrol managed to get all of us inside to shelter." 

 

The lower chair at Baldy moves at a snail's pace and wind funnels into the Notch at the top of that lift.   Early in the morning in wind and shade you can arrive at the Notch and definitely need to go in for thaw break.

 

 

As a SoCal resident nearly all my life my tolerance for cold is not the greatest.   The most immediately painful experience was on MLK weekend of 1987 when I made the error of riding the then slow chair 3 at Mammoth at -5F temp and -55F wind chill.  My hands felt like rocks at the end of my wrists when I got to the top, so I retreated to mid-station for a very extended break during which the hand thawing was quite painful.  MLK weekend 2007 at Mammoth was -12F but minimal wind.  Oddly both of those were slow starting Sierra seasons with marginal off-trail coverage so the skiing was not all that good. 1987 was before snowmaking so even the groomers were rocky and we only skied the one day, which probably rates overall as the worst of the 300+ days I've ever skied at Mammoth.

 

Once I started traveling to interior western Canada I encountered subzero F temps a few more times, 3 of them at Castle Mt.   Early Feb. 2004 was -9F but no wind.  My last time there in late Feb. 2014 was about 0F but it was windy so the upper chair was closed for -40 wind chill.  The NASJA meeting in Banff late March 2002 had declining temps over 4 days.  Saturday at Norquay was ~0F and nobody skied the last day when it was -20F in Banff.

 

My record for absolute cold temps was Jan. 18, 2012 at Mustang Snowcat.  It was -22F but no wind, and more importantly we were riding up the hill in a snowcat rather than on chairlifts.  The prior day had been -6F so I prepared for the -22F with 4 upper layers and 3 lower layers under my ski suit, plus face mask and boot gloves.  Being in the cat and having deep powder made those particular cold days awesome: http://www.firsttracksonline.com/boards/viewtopic.php?t=9973

post #106 of 182
10 below in Blue Sky Basin(Vail) when a surprise snowstorm rolled in with 30-40 mile an hour winds . I didn't have a face mask . I crawled back to Two Elk Lodge with frostbite on my face .
post #107 of 182
My coldest day.. well I've regularly patrolled in the -20 to -26f range because our ski area owner has a tendency to hold his thumb over the thermometer when he decides if we will be open or not. The official cut off is -20f for us.

The actual coldest I've been skiing in was as part of a torchlight processional group as we escorted the bride and groom down the local area for their wedding. It was late December and right around -40f when we did that. I'm happy to say that those two are still happily married and are both still ski patrolling with us.
post #108 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

Probably about a dozen years ago, New England was embraced by a three-week long arctic blast.  The high temps at Cannon Mt. (New Hampshire) didn't climb above 0F the entire time.  During that spell I saw -29F on Cannon's summit thermometer.  That was, and remains, the coldest I've ever seen on a thermometer.

 

I remember that, it was winter of 2003-04, in January. It was my first season instructing, and I was working at Okemo. I think we saw the positive side of the thermometer once that entire month. I was out on the bunny hill every single day, teaching 4 year olds to do a pizza while their parents came in at the end of the day in street clothes because they spent the day in the condo. Grrr. I have to say that month is the coldest I have ever felt, because it was my first experience with being compelled to stay outside for long stretches in bitter cold. I had just moved up to Vermont from Massachusetts the month before, and always had the convenience of going/staying inside when it was that cold before then. I wore a base layer, two or three fleeces, my civilian jacket, and my uniform jacket. My legs had two or three pairs of long underwear and a pair or two of flannel pajama pants. 

 

Since then, I've moved even further north and spend scads of time out in the bitter cold and wind. I now realize I've spent time in weather that is actually significantly colder than it was that month back in 2004, but my blood has thickened to such a molasses-like sludge that I don't feel it as acutely as I did back then. Two seasons ago was a wicked cold season at Stowe, and I remember days when I would think "oh, finally a warm day" as I was skiing in a short sleeve base layer, thin fleece and a jacket, and sweating as I skied. Then I'd ski by a lift station, and realize it was five below zero. I get into "crap it's cold" mode at about 10-15 below these days. 

post #109 of 182

Not my coldest day out, but at around age 10 I was on the chairlift at Squaw Mountain in Greenviille, Me when it was stopped.  Peed off the side and you could hear the pee hit the frozen snow as ice. Has to be pretty cold to flash freeze pee.

post #110 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by tylrwnzl View Post
 

I was just looking through some old photos and came across this one of @Jamesj, myself, and @jimmy from the first day of the 2013 Mid-Atlantic gathering. I believe @marznc and @NJskier164 were there that day as well. 

 

 

This was my car at the end of the day:

 

 

I was stuck waiting nearly half an hour until the windshield warmed up enough to get enough ice off to see (and was an hour down the road before all the ice actually came off). The plastic ice scraper I had was useless, and the pickup truck driver lent me a metal one that didn't do much better. Up on top of the mountain it was staying at about 22 degrees all day, but it was raining pretty good and there was a stiff 20 mph breeze. We had to stick to the lower mountain because it was hard to endure sitting on the chair above the mid-mountain lift. I've skied in much colder (last time I was at Jay Peak it was something like 20 below plus the wind factor), but I don't think I've ever felt as cold as that day at Blue Knob. What's your coldest ski day experience?

 

Bonus photo: ski goggles after riding the lift to the lodge up top. 

 


I have posted my account elsewhere on here but I never know who saw that.

About 7 years ago we timed the February Blizzard based on depth and width and height of it and looked at the jet stream.  We met at Sugar Mountain NC It snowed for 3 or four days straight.  When I showed up the bar was closing and my Native America friend was already wasted at the bar and fell in the parking lot.  I had to make it up the Mountain in Toyota 4X4.  He was so drunk when we got to the office for the complex we were looking for the key drop box and he points to a wooden life size bear statue and says, "Oh theres someone"  The next day we went down to base to start the day and they had frostbite warning signs posted (during the day even ).  The day didn't seem to bad but the snow was relentless.  Later during the night was when things started getting bad at least for me.  My friend had ski stuff on but I only had endless layers and a Framers coat on.  I have a full face Dirt Bike helmet which was helpful because at least I could hide in it.  The snow was still going sideways and the wind was going sideways too-constantly.  But of course some of my recounting of this story has to be somewhat fallible here or there because I just don't know.  Things eventually got so bad that my friend was starting to wonder if I would get into a bad spot.  It was so bad I had one hand over the chin guard to try to trap as much heat in there as possible.  When we got to the top I actually questioned whether or not we would be blown off the mountain but quickly realized we would be okay.  Then I saw two kids about 16 sitting casually talking with no concern.  So we headed back down to the ski in parking lot to drive back to the room.  My friend was so drunk he boarded off the switchback but his fall was arrested by the snow depth before he hit the trees.  I forgot... we had to go down to one lift over to get back half way up to the lot.  There was a hard core Mexican lift attendant and he was happy and faring very well.  Then my friend fell flat over at a stand still.  He got on the lift and we went back up.  We got to the complex and he drops the key right in the1.5-2.5 feet of powder collected at the stairwell.  He found it immediately.  Then he woke up in the middle of the night and the patio door was open and the room was very cold.  I was drunk and under the covers so I was fine.  The next day we had to leave so I wanted to walk way up to the next thing at the way top.  I had to turn around within maybe six minutes.  Even without any wind my nose was burning so bad I had to go back down.  I am mostly afraid to quote temperatures but I am more confident about wind speeds.  Temps maybe 12 F daytime and maybe -5F that night ?  I am 5'9" and about 165 and am small so I get cold very fast...I wish I had a better story.

To Hear one of the best stories on this topic ask OldGoat

post #111 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by KevinF View Post
 

Quote:

 

I remember at Cannon (the source of my 29 below day that I mentioned earlier in this thread) they had employees at the lodge doors and they wouldn't let you out to ride the lifts if any skin was showing.  I guess they couldn't actually prevent you from skiing, but it seemed like a smart move on their part.

 

I belong to a night race league at a small hill (about 250 vertical) here in eastern Massachusetts.  I guess Nashoba Valley is about the size of some mid-western hills?  At any rate, we get some pretty chilly nights; low single digits above or below.  With the 20 second runs down and the slow lift back up -- I can never get enough movement going to actually feel warm.  Those nights are "thermometer warmer", but actually feel colder in a way than the "stupid cold" temps the mountains in northern New England experience.  At least when you have 2,000 vertical to work with you can sort-of feel warm as you get back on the lift.

 

You Minnesota types posting these ridiculous cold temps that you experience -- you've got my respect.  Thumbs Up


One of my main things I want to do is ski in theses -35 temperature ranges some day

post #112 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by freeski919 View Post
 

I remember that, it was winter of 2003-04, in January. It was my first season instructing, and I was working at Okemo. I think we saw the positive side of the thermometer once that entire month. I was out on the bunny hill every single day, teaching 4 year olds to do a pizza while their parents came in at the end of the day in street clothes because they spent the day in the condo. Grrr. I have to say that month is the coldest I have ever felt, because it was my first experience with being compelled to stay outside for long stretches in bitter cold. I had just moved up to Vermont from Massachusetts the month before, and always had the convenience of going/staying inside when it was that cold before then. I wore a base layer, two or three fleeces, my civilian jacket, and my uniform jacket. My legs had two or three pairs of long underwear and a pair or two of flannel pajama pants. 

 

Since then, I've moved even further north and spend scads of time out in the bitter cold and wind. I now realize I've spent time in weather that is actually significantly colder than it was that month back in 2004, but my blood has thickened to such a molasses-like sludge that I don't feel it as acutely as I did back then. Two seasons ago was a wicked cold season at Stowe, and I remember days when I would think "oh, finally a warm day" as I was skiing in a short sleeve base layer, thin fleece and a jacket, and sweating as I skied. Then I'd ski by a lift station, and realize it was five below zero. I get into "crap it's cold" mode at about 10-15 below these days. 


I think tons of pancakes and sausage and whole milk and a multivitamin may help.  Then keep the snickers in the pockets for the slopes.  I received the battery shirt tonight in the mail.  That thing was $ 150 and I just want it for last train home at the end of the day back down to the Infra.

post #113 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by disasterskier View Post
 


I think tons of pancakes and sausage and whole milk and a multivitamin may help.  Then keep the snickers in the pockets for the slopes.  I received the battery shirt tonight in the mail.  That thing was $ 150 and I just want it for last train home at the end of the day back down to the Infra.


"Thats right Captain.-Pure energy"- Mr Spock

post #114 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by tank8681 View Post
 

-35 with windchill up at Tremblant during January. So cold I had trouble breathing and I could only ski for an hour. Got back to the condo and had to walk shirtless into the hottub 5 feet outside. Cold as fuck!


Yeah I tried the hot tub at Jerico B&B Marlinton WV but I couldn't make it the 40 feet.  It was about maybe 9-15 F

post #115 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by tank8681 View Post
 

-35 with windchill up at Tremblant during January. So cold I had trouble breathing and I could only ski for an hour. Got back to the condo and had to walk shirtless into the hottub 5 feet outside. Cold as fuck!


Yeah those temps are bad-ass

The coldest temperature recorded in the contiguous U.S. is 70 degrees below zero, measured at Rogers Pass, Montana, on Jan. 20, 1954.

​I don't want to ski in that I just want to get my warmest set up and walk home half a mile in that from the bar.

Uh oh.  This is precisely when I have to add Disaster Bear to my current Ski entourage.  Disaster Bear also wears the dirt bike helmet and he carries me home or sleeps on top of me to keep me warm if I pass out on the way home.  By the way, While Disaster Vulture hovers faithfully above.,  Wolfachute/Parawolf loyally and adeptly trails along side with the rescue Vodka bottles.  And for those who are dying to know, yes he always carries a one week supply for our aforementioned entourage in case we get stranded. I would carry Marlboro lights but DV is trying to quit.

​For explanation on all this just look up the terms of my ski companions on this site.

post #116 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by Wolfski View Post
 

As a rec skier I never wanted to go out below 0. As a racer it got wicked cold on numerous occasions, as a coach it was cold all the time, below 0, with the wind, we're bundled up just standing on the hill planting wickets and changing courses as fast as we can get back up the hill just to stay warm lol

 

Miss those days


Track my hilarious posts about my Ski pets.  uSe search term Parawolf/Wolfachute

post #117 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by SHREDHEAD View Post
 

-34f, severe clear and not a breath of wind. 

Aspen Highlands back when Whip still owned it.  Steeple Chase was opening for the first time that year. 

It took four old lifts back then just to get up to Loge and they kept breaking down.  I only had one run by noon and I was freezing my butt off.

That was probably the last time I skied Highland's under Whips ownership.  

ASC taking over was the best thing that ever happend to Highlands.

That and Mack Smith.


Sometimes you guys talk about very bad situations in a jocular way.

post #118 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by firebanex View Post

My coldest day.. well I've regularly patrolled in the -20 to -26f range because our ski area owner has a tendency to hold his thumb over the thermometer when he decides if we will be open or not. The official cut off is -20f for us.

The actual coldest I've been skiing in was as part of a torchlight processional group as we escorted the bride and groom down the local area for their wedding. It was late December and right around -40f when we did that. I'm happy to say that those two are still happily married and are both still ski patrolling with us.


Why were you out there at those 

Quote:
Originally Posted by Jimmypowder View Post

10 below in Blue Sky Basin(Vail) when a surprise snowstorm rolled in with 30-40 mile an hour winds . I didn't have a face mask . I crawled back to Two Elk Lodge with frostbite on my face .


Yeah but you didn't finish the story.  What did they do for the frost bite.  I haven't had that but I have 3 fingers with White Finger disease burnt by the cold

post #119 of 182
Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinacub View Post
 


I remember days like that on Highlands. I played ski bum there from 80-83. I'm thinking you preceded me by a few years. Steeplechase was open but not very well defined yet. To the best of my knowledge my last year there was the first year they allowed a select few to do highlands bowl. You had to do a ski test with the patrol and almost everyone failed the test..


I could totally rock that try out as long as you mean by "head test" to see who can go the longest way on his head or broken back or leg etc.  "but that was the leg I use for rocks."

post #120 of 182

Killington, in 86 or 87 late Jan. 4 of us pooled money to do 3 nights. First day was a blast, pretty cold in the neg 10's but sunny and not windy. Day 2 the thermometer outside of the condo window said -27. We had stuff to cover everything so we went. Geared up and got to the first lift, "Hey this aint bad" rode pretty comfortably about 1/2 way up,and then the trees became white and the wind hit. I have no idea what the wind chill was but I had been out in -50 wc before where the fuel oil gelled in the tanks and this was worse. It was a instant ice cream headache with tooth pain. IT FREAKIN HURT. We got off the lift and headed down and once in the trees the wind got blocked some so it was do able, and once you got below the wind line it was pretty nice, but getting back on that lift was a act of will.

 

As to cold vs cold and wet, I will take cold every day of the week. I work outside and wet and 40 will take you out faster than dry -20. You can go hypothermic faster because you lose heat faster when wet/damp and bundling up just makes you sweat, which means you get wet faster.


Edited by Varmintmist - 1/4/17 at 7:08pm
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