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Spent the half of the day on one ski

post #1 of 16
Thread Starter 

Well, I had both of them on but I would ski half way down the beginner trail on one and then switch to the other ski (I just get too tired going all the way down on the same one).  A total four hours doing this drill.  It took the first hour to figure it out.  I have been skiing for a long time, and overall feel relatively good about how I ski. With that said, the last four hours of skiing was an eye opener.  

 

What I learned............

 

1) I was not rolling my ankles.  Don't know how I went about tipping my skis but it definitely was not with the ankles.  I'm guessing my knees.  The difference is probably subtle, but not.  Don't know how to explain it.  

 

2) Forward lean was probably off most of the time.  One footed skiing required a specific body position.  Shins into boots, but not overly forward.  In the past I always tried to make sure I was driving my shins into the boot.  I think I focused so much on it that I was just parked there, and now I think there is a lot more to it than that.  Also, the minute I did not have proper forward pressure, one footed skiing just did not work, at best it ends up being a skidded turn with a  lifted footed flailing around like a wounded fish.  With proper forward position the lifted foot was nice and quiet. 

 

3) Balanced body.  I talked about my  problem previously in the "Banking Thread".  I think I found at least one way to stop banking.  Yup, one foot skiing.  Leaning in is not an option; you're going down or you will not be able to carve it cleanly.  This was one of the biggest things I learned and finally started to feel.  I am amazed how out of position I was skiing last year.  I need to really work on this. 

 

4)  More of a pendulum feel to the transitions.  I think this also started to help eliminate the banking issue.  I found myself not standing up as much between the turns.  Rather, the ski just carved under me.  Probably some of my body staying more pointed down the falline stuff going on here as well, being forced by the need to stay balanced.  

 

5) Finally understand the term "blockage".  I really couldn't park myself in the turn because the balance would start get messed up. More speed required more tipping, but I would hit a limit and had to change direction.  That was an aha moment for me.  With this aha moments came...............

 

6) Patience especially in the beginning of the turn.  Had to be smooth starting the turn, couldn't just jam it.  There was a nano second when I had "pressure" which felt right a the point I was about to change direction.  

 

So, when I placed both skis on the ground I was all of a sudden able to do nice garland turns at slow speed because I finally started to feel how far "forward"  (not sure I like that word)  I needed to be to initiate the turn (always had trouble at slow speeds), and I was using the ankles to turn.  My feet were also closer together when going slow.  Actually the spacing in theory was the same at higher speeds, except for the fact that I was tipping further, causing more separation between the skis.  My feet were doing a much better job of getting away from under me.  I could turn much more fluidly and finally started to feel when I needed to change directions without being stuck or blocked.  Also, my upper body was much quieter.

 

Skis used:  Slalom

 

So here are the questions...

 

1) Does this make sense?

 

2) Is there a way to do a modified version of this drill on steeper terrain (i.e. whitepass turns)?

 

 

Nice to be on snow again.  I am going back to beginner slope again tomorrow.  

 

Pete

post #2 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by peterk123 View Post
 

Well, I had both of them on but I would ski half way down the beginner trail on one and then switch to the other ski (I just get too tired going all the way down on the same one).  A total four hours doing this drill.  It took the first hour to figure it out.  I have been skiing for a long time, and overall feel relatively good about how I ski. With that said, the last four hours of skiing was an eye opener.  

 

What I learned............

 

1) I was not rolling my ankles.  Don't know how I went about tipping my skis but it definitely was not with the ankles.  I'm guessing my knees.  The difference is probably subtle, but not.  Don't know how to explain it.  

 

2) Forward lean was probably off most of the time.  One footed skiing required a specific body position.  Shins into boots, but not overly forward.  In the past I always tried to make sure I was driving my shins into the boot.  I think I focused so much on it that I was just parked there, and now I think there is a lot more to it than that.  Also, the minute I did not have proper forward pressure, one footed skiing just did not work, at best it ends up being a skidded turn with a  lifted footed flailing around like a wounded fish.  With proper forward position the lifted foot was nice and quiet. 

 

3) Balanced body.  I talked about my  problem previously in the "Banking Thread".  I think I found at least one way to stop banking.  Yup, one foot skiing.  Leaning in is not an option; you're going down or you will not be able to carve it cleanly.  This was one of the biggest things I learned and finally started to feel.  I am amazed how out of position I was skiing last year.  I need to really work on this. 

 

4)  More of a pendulum feel to the transitions.  I think this also started to help eliminate the banking issue.  I found myself not standing up as much between the turns.  Rather, the ski just carved under me.  Probably some of my body staying more pointed down the falline stuff going on here as well, being forced by the need to stay balanced.  

 

5) Finally understand the term "blockage".  I really couldn't park myself in the turn because the balance would start get messed up. More speed required more tipping, but I would hit a limit and had to change direction.  That was an aha moment for me.  With this aha moments came...............

 

6) Patience especially in the beginning of the turn.  Had to be smooth starting the turn, couldn't just jam it.  There was a nano second when I had "pressure" which felt right a the point I was about to change direction.  

 

So, when I placed both skis on the ground I was all of a sudden able to do nice garland turns at slow speed because I finally started to feel how far "forward"  (not sure I like that word)  I needed to be to initiate the turn (always had trouble at slow speeds), and I was using the ankles to turn.  My feet were also closer together when going slow.  Actually the spacing in theory was the same at higher speeds, except for the fact that I was tipping further, causing more separation between the skis.  My feet were doing a much better job of getting away from under me.  I could turn much more fluidly and finally started to feel when I needed to change directions without being stuck or blocked.  Also, my upper body was much quieter.

 

Skis used:  Slalom

 

So here are the questions...

 

1) Does this make sense?

 

2) Is there a way to do a modified version of this drill on steeper terrain (i.e. whitepass turns)?

 

 

Nice to be on snow again.  I am going back to beginner slope again tomorrow.  

 

Pete

Congratulations on the effort.   Not a lot of folks are  serious enough about their skiing to torture themselves like that  ( it's actually quite instructive and lots of fun if you are into it).   I think at least two things happened which were quite instructive for you.  1.  skiing on one leg it was hard for you to use ingrained turning habits you have from usually being on two feet  so it was necessary to discover something new.  2.  turning while on one foot eliminates some of the crutch mechanisms generally used while balancing on two feet.  Interesting to notice that you cannot balance on one foot with your legs too far apart  (notice I said legs [lateral] and not feet [vertical]  separation.   YM

post #3 of 16
Pete,

You're beginning to learn what it means when people say that skiing is a balance sport. Challenge yourself to start every non-powder day this season that way. And when you back off to two footed skiing, lift one foot for each turn so you know you're balancing over your skis rather than doing that golf cart "skiing" stuff that you see all over the mountain.
post #4 of 16

Well done! Next up: tracer turns (99% weight on one foot vs 100% weight) and then mix it up between normal weighting, tracer and one ski in the same run, When you can smoothly switch between the 3 modes you will have reached another level of performance.

post #5 of 16
Yes. Skiing with your ankle makes sense every turn, always. Keep doing it.
post #6 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Well done! Next up: tracer turns (99% weight on one foot vs 100% weight) and then mix it up between normal weighting, tracer and one ski in the same run, When you can smoothly switch between the 3 modes you will have reached another level of performance.

Rusty, Is this your subtle way of saying "Don't forget about the inside"?   

 

As interesting as Peterk123's self analysis is there is only so much assumption of edge that one can do on one ski.  

 

Regarding his #5.   To ski (and focus) only on the outside ski actually leads to a "blocking" stance as the turn progresses because the upper mass has to bend and compress over that ski in order to increase edge.   To the contrary and as JF says,  "Edging happens as a result of the inside leg getting shorter" which allows for a "free fall" on the outside ski. " 

 

Anyone interested can watch his video here, specifically starting around 2:10 in

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I_XuGWW6vcQ

post #7 of 16

I didn't read your post carefully, but am glad to see that you left both skis on.  Most resorts would not allow you to ski on one ski only.

post #8 of 16

@ Peterk
The ankles should most definitely be used to get the ski on edges. Do not use the knees (in my opinion that is wrong)! Moreover the hip socket can be used to get the ski on edge, which is probably what was primarily happening, provided that you were doing it right .
One ski skiing is not really a solution for banking if you ask me though, especially when skiing on one ski, people start skiing with a lot of body inclination, because it is the easiest way to stay balanced and get the ski on edge. You can easily ski with body inclination and maintain a balanced body position due to speed and momentum.
Leaning forward when skiing on ski is indeed incredibly hard, I prefer being centered over leaning forward when skiing on one ski, hence I think that makes sense.

post #9 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by JESINSTR View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Well done! Next up: tracer turns (99% weight on one foot vs 100% weight) and then mix it up between normal weighting, tracer and one ski in the same run, When you can smoothly switch between the 3 modes you will have reached another level of performance.

Rusty, Is this your subtle way of saying "Don't forget about the inside"?   

 

No. Nothing subtle was intended. A lot of people get sidetracked reinforcing bad movements when they try to ski on one ski. It's rare to see it work without coaching. But once it does, then the trick is to take the movements back into your regular skiing. Personally, I got "there" via the White Pass drill. As much as that helped my skiing, I found that tracer turns are better at reinforcing what I learned now that I've learned it. I was doing tracer turns today as part of my "day 1" get back into form work. One of the tricks with one ski skiing and the White Pass drill is that you still need to flex and extend the lifted leg. That solves the blocking problem. I learned the lifted leg movements for the White Pass drill, but it's much easier to learn in tracer turns. Once you can consciously mix up the different drill types seamlessly with regular skiing, it's very easy to make the movements unconsciously in your regular skiing.

post #10 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

 

No. Nothing subtle was intended. A lot of people get sidetracked reinforcing bad movements when they try to ski on one ski. It's rare to see it work without coaching. But once it does, then the trick is to take the movements back into your regular skiing. Personally, I got "there" via the White Pass drill. As much as that helped my skiing, I found that tracer turns are better at reinforcing what I learned now that I've learned it. I was doing tracer turns today as part of my "day 1" get back into form work. One of the tricks with one ski skiing and the White Pass drill is that you still need to flex and extend the lifted leg. That solves the blocking problem. I learned the lifted leg movements for the White Pass drill, but it's much easier to learn in tracer turns. Once you can consciously mix up the different drill types seamlessly with regular skiing, it's very easy to make the movements unconsciously in your regular skiing.

 

Yes. I got into skiing on one ski long ago, thinking it would help my technique, and because I thought it was cool. In many ways, it did help my technique. But it backfired in one important area: I became too quick to use/engage the inside ski! Being able to gracefully complete a turn that's going south on an inside ski is a good skill to have when it's absolutely necessary, but I started to use my dominant leg total crutch on the inside...not so much fully skiing on it, but putting  too much weight on it too often and too early. I'm convinced that one-ski practice exacerbated this, if not caused it. 

 

Rusty is 100% correct that it's critical to reinforce real world movements, which pure one ski movements are not, usually. I still do a lot of 1000 steps and tracers as warm-ups and to get back on my game when feeling off, but not just one ski skiing for extended periods any more. 


Edited by LiveJazz - 12/7/15 at 8:56am
post #11 of 16
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

 

No. Nothing subtle was intended. A lot of people get sidetracked reinforcing bad movements when they try to ski on one ski. It's rare to see it work without coaching. But once it does, then the trick is to take the movements back into your regular skiing. Personally, I got "there" via the White Pass drill. As much as that helped my skiing, I found that tracer turns are better at reinforcing what I learned now that I've learned it. I was doing tracer turns today as part of my "day 1" get back into form work. One of the tricks with one ski skiing and the White Pass drill is that you still need to flex and extend the lifted leg. That solves the blocking problem. I learned the lifted leg movements for the White Pass drill, but it's much easier to learn in tracer turns. Once you can consciously mix up the different drill types seamlessly with regular skiing, it's very easy to make the movements unconsciously in your regular skiing.

I worked on the Whitepass turn on Sunday.  That is a tricky move because now I needed to think about what I needed to do with each foot.  I actually founded it more difficult than just one footed skiing.  Unfortunately there were too many people on our narrow trails so I could not spend much time doing it.  This exercise seems to encourage/teach the patience thing with the outside edging.  Looking forward to working on that a bit more next weekend.  I need to look up tracer turns, that is a new one for me.  

post #12 of 16

One leg skiing?  Here's how you do it!  (starts at 1:47:00 in...)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jCItXmhnAHQ

post #13 of 16
post #14 of 16
After tracer turns, really want to fine tune that edge control? Sshmeared/steered one footed turns at slow speeds. Its easy to stand and balance against an edged ski. Shmeared slow speed turns on one foot, especially on that little toe side... Now there is precision in edge control and balance.
post #15 of 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by JaneB View Post

I didn't read your post carefully, but am glad to see that you left both skis on.  Most resorts would not allow you to ski on one ski only.

Thankfully no one has told the race program folks out here... or my groups at times. smile.gif
post #16 of 16
There are exceptions. 3 trackers.
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