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Starting over again...

post #1 of 11
Thread Starter 
Sorry to be sort of redundant. I asked similar questions over time. Yet after reading a recent post yesterday(can't find it again) by an instructor re trying to teach skiers using wide skis, it made sort of sense. Again, I haven't skied in 11 years. HOPEFULLY I can afford it this year, but being out of work, it will be tough. I am 6' 230lbs. I want to rent skis the first day or two, hit the bunny slope to get my balance, stopping, etc. Then ski hopefully ski the greens to get back to basics. I also want to take a 1/2 day private lesson to get the proper techniques down. Here's the thing. I was thinking of demoing the Kendo, Vantage 90 CTI, etc. Yet after reading that article, that might not be good for me starting over again. Yet will want them eventually. I will ski groomed, yet want to go ungroomed on the side of the trails, maybe trees, and for the ungroomed piles of junk at the end of the day. SO, rather than spending money rent, demo skis most, or all, of the season, THEN buying what I want on sale when the season ends, I was thinking of simply having new, inexpensive bindings installed on my 2001 Salomon X-Screams, tuning them, then take lessons and use them for practice until I AM good enough to use the wider, high performance skis. A couple of hundred $$ or less for the bindings, saving the $900+ for the new skis, to use on lessons and lift tickets. Any thoughts? I know the new skis are much easier to ski and are more tech than my old Sallies, yet am thinking of the $$ factor.
post #2 of 11

Nothing wrong with your old Solly's for the time being if they're long enough for you. As far as bindings I assume you're changing them because the old ones aren't indemnified or don't adjust high enough for your current weight. I would stick to new bindings and you may need to go up scale some to get a binding that can handle your weight. Figure out what you're DIN setting is going to be before you buy bindings. As far as lessons you can probably get more for your dollar with a group lesson, especially at the higher levels, which tend to have fewer students. 

post #3 of 11
Thread Starter 
Thanks!!!!! I appreciate the reply. I need new bindings because I've inquired a number of ski shops and they won't touch them, saying they are too old. And back then I was under 200lbs. Skis are 187 length. How DO I find out the DIN setting for my weight?
post #4 of 11
post #5 of 11
2001 skis are horrible compared to what is on the market today, at any skier level. You would be better off renting skis, or trying to find used ones. You can find a decent pair of skis used for 250, which isn't much when you consider the cost of a new binding plus mounting it.
post #6 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by clink83 View Post

2001 skis are horrible compared to what is on the market today, at any skier level. You would be better off renting skis, or trying to find used ones. You can find a decent pair of skis used for 250, which isn't much when you consider the cost of a new binding plus mounting it.

Horrible? Seriously? We're not talking about straight skis here. Those skis are very similar to a recent front side ski, except for the lack of (mnimal) tip rocker, which will make little difference on the groomed. A used ski wirh bindings for $250 is not going to be much of a ski. If the OP buys new bindings for the x screams he can use them on new skis when he buys them. Obviously new skis would be ideal, but given the OP's lack of employment not the first priority. Better to minimize gear purchases as he gets back into the sport until he sees how it's going, gets a better idea of what the new gear is like and what it's good for, and what he's looking for.

post #7 of 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by oldgoat View Post
 

Horrible? Seriously? We're not talking about straight skis here. Those skis are very similar to a recent front side ski, except for the lack of (mnimal) tip rocker, which will make little difference on the groomed. A used ski wirh bindings for $250 is not going to be much of a ski. If the OP buys new bindings for the x screams he can use them on new skis when he buys them. Obviously new skis would be ideal, but given the OP's lack of employment not the first priority. Better to minimize gear purchases as he gets back into the sport until he sees how it's going, gets a better idea of what the new gear is like and what it's good for, and what he's looking for.

 

Horrible might be a strong term here, but the new skis are much better.  I believe that if you are on a ski much older than 5 years you are really missing out.  I also think that you can find very good used skis and bindings for $250-$350.  I would go this route instead of putting a new binding on a 15 yo ski.  A used ski that you buy for $250 is going to be worth about $250 at the end of the season or it could be kept for a rock ski.  My garage is full of good skis that I am planning on selling for $350 and less.  I just sold a pair of my older skis in good condition to another instructor for $75 with bindings.  Those skis were maybe 9 seasons old and in good tune with no edge damage or core shots.  

post #8 of 11
My exact thought when skiing the xscream my friend was skiing was "this is a horrible ski", so take it for what you want.
A local consignment shop is advertising a pair of 181cm 4frtnt MSPs with STH 16 bindings for 275, and a local pawn shop had a pair of Rossy cheater GS skis with PX14s in like new conditionfor 200. They aren't suitable for the OP, but its a good example of premium gear for dirt cheap.

The OP needs to ignore Seths rant about how wide skis are hard to learn on too, its nonsense. You don't need a metal freeride ski to learn on, but learning to ski on something 85-90mm underfoot is going to make life a lot easier unless you're skiing east coast ice. In the real world there is powder, slush, cut up groomed runs, and off list skiing that having a bit more platform underneath is going to really help a beginner. The last thing a beginner intermediate skier needs is a blown ACL from tail gunning skinny skis on a powder day.
Edited by clink83 - 12/7/15 at 7:47am
post #9 of 11

Your x-scream would be better for learning on groomed runs in NY than any fat ski.

 

That being said, you could get a used ski plus binding for about the same money as getting decent bindings for your X-Screams.  If you spend the twenty bucks for a memership at Realskiers.com, you will be able to look up stats on skis from the past 15 years or so to help you evaluate the ski when you find it on sale at a consignment shop or e-bay, CL, etc. 

 

If you decide to just use your non-indemnified binding do check it carefully for any signs of stress, but remember that due to plastic aging it could fail without any warning, and don't forget to set the forward pressure.

post #10 of 11

Ditto on Ghost's,

 ...You might want to put $$ into having your alignment(fore/aft-lateral)...boots + bindings checked/tweaked, or find better boots, so you can jump onto any ski you want to try. The body changes over 11 years.  There are terrific prices in a lot of skis out there....but a friendly boot & alignment will help bump up any progress you want to make... 

There are a lot of good deals on skis, just have to shop a bit...

post #11 of 11

How many days of renting good skis (not beginner skis) will you get for the price of new bindings plus installation?  Or, check second hand shops or consignment shops in the town at the ski hill for decent new-to-you skis.  The Real Skier site is good.

 

Everyone here agrees, boot are more important than skis.  Boots that are suitable for your size, weight, foot shape, and skiing style, properly fitted, are your most important equipment.  Get boots that are just right for you and used skis.  Your skiing will improve the fastest.  Put the old Salomons to a good use--tomato stakes in your garden.  (I didn't like them when they were current--just not right for me.)

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