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some interesting issues

post #1 of 27
Thread Starter 

Hello everyone.

I have some interesting issues.

This has nothing to do with the controversy.

But with your eye related.

Who's skiing better than another who?

Taichi said Chris Brown is CSIA L2.

I do not know are you agree?

Who should be the level of what?

Who was the first ski technique?

Who ski technology is second?

Who ski technology is the third?

Which one you prefer skiing action?

Thank you for your reply.

Norman

 

Taichi

 

Chris Brown

 

Norman

post #2 of 27

Watch until 1:18

 

:popcorn

post #3 of 27

Yes, you do have interesting issues. 

post #4 of 27

"Very interesting"

post #5 of 27
Thread Starter 

Yes, this is an interesting topic.

Not quarrel.

Just examine anyone eyesight.:DThumbs Up 

post #6 of 27

So you're an eye doctor?

post #7 of 27
It looks like no one is having fun?

Didn't watch long. Need less intro.
post #8 of 27

First of all, TaiChi is no Zen.  Very different!

 

To my eye, TaiChi Skiing is natural and unaffected, but is naturally poor skiing.  Do not copy.

To my eye, Chris Brown skiing is moderately good tchnique (better than TaiChi), but like Golf Cart, too constricted, too controlled, affected and not yet developed enough to be fully released (skiing is more natural in third quarter of video).

To my eye, Norman skiing shows great potential, it is natural and flowing, just needs some work on being more flexible and aggressive and more time learning good technique for more aggressive skiing.  Advise that Norman take good technique and combine with natural carefree attitude.

 

Maybe I am semi-blind, but that is what my eye sees.

post #9 of 27
Thread Starter 

This is a great personal opinion.Thumbs Up

Just express their personal opinion only.

post #10 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by HeluvaSkier View Post
 

So you're an eye doctor?

Sorry, I don’t.

 

But you can write opinion and see other opinion.:)

post #11 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 

To my eye, Chris Brown skiing is moderately good tchnique (better than TaiChi), but like Golf Cart, too constricted, too controlled, affected and not yet developed enough to be fully released (skiing is more natural in third quarter of video).

 

To his defense I think he is demonstrating lower lever skills. It is not his natural skiing. 

post #12 of 27

Was Chris Brown singing 'Fine China' when skiing with Taichi?

post #13 of 27

If Zen skiing is demonstrating perfect form, then all those are as far from Zen as anything. This is Zen skiing:

 

post #14 of 27

Ni Hao Norman,

 

You are asking us to compare apple to oranges to tomatoes. They are all fruits (and one of them is quite an odd fruit). You have shown us 3 clips of skiers doing 3 different things that shouldn't be labeled better or worse than each other any more than a tomato is better or worse than an apple. If you want to improve your own skiing performance, you can choose to follow either of the same paths as the other two skiers or you can continue to follow your own path. On your path, the next biggest step that you can take is to learn how to move your body across the skis during the transition phase between turns instead of going "up and over". Can you see the vertical movement of your upper body? Chris's first turns have minimized this "up" movement but you can still see his turns start with an extension movement that drives his upper body up slightly. This is part of the Canadian style. They make it work. But what they have done is redirected most of the up movement into a horizontal movement of the body to the inside of the new turn (i.e. across the skis). This lets the ski push them into the new turn instead of pulling them. Where you see your hips slightly behind your heels, the skis are pulling you down the slope. It is hard to get the best performance skiing that way.

 

Try this exercise. Find a flat snow covered surface and get a friend off their skis to help you. Stand tall on your flat skis so that your toes, knees and nose are all over the same spot on the snow. Have your friend gently push (not too hard) both of your skis forward 2 inches/3cm (without warning). You'll probably jerk suddenly as you try to avoid falling backward. This is an exaggeration of how you make your turns today. Next have your friend do the same move on a count of 3, but this time at the 3 count you will also slightly move your weight from over the center of the feet to over the balls of the feet (e.g. try to stand on your toes a little bit). The goal is to have your whole body move forward as a unit instead of the jerky movement from the first part of the exercise. This should give you the same feeling of power that the next level of skiing performance feels like. This exercise won't teach how to move your body across the skis instead of up and over, but it will start you on a zen like path to get there.

 

Say "jiao" to David for me?

post #15 of 27

Is this a Turing Test?

post #16 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by fatbob View Post
 

Is this a Turing Test?


Did I pass?

post #17 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

You have shown us 3 clips of skiers doing 3 different things that shouldn't be labeled better or worse than each other any more than a tomato is better or worse than an apple.

I understand this is a joke thread. The above nonetheless captures perfectly everything that is wrong with PSIA's view of ski instruction.
post #18 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by HardDaysNight View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post

You have shown us 3 clips of skiers doing 3 different things that shouldn't be labeled better or worse than each other any more than a tomato is better or worse than an apple.

I understand this is a joke thread. The above nonetheless captures perfectly everything that is wrong with PSIA's view of ski instruction.


You misunderstand.  The thread is not meant to be a joke.  Norman is asking our opinion, and I suspect he is asking with a view to improve his own skiing.

In my opinion the Chris Brown skiing is better than the taichi skiing, the Taichi skiing shows wonderful fluidity of movement, but it is the wrong movements.   Norman would do well to icorporate the fluidity of the taichi skiing into the movements of the Chris Brown skiing (and perhaps find a better model for the movements too).

post #19 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post


You misunderstand.  The thread is not meant to be a joke. 

Are you sure? Damned if I can get the knack of this internet thing 😎
post #20 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Ni Hao Norman,

 

You are asking us to compare apple to oranges to tomatoes. They are all fruits (and one of them is quite an odd fruit). You have shown us 3 clips of skiers doing 3 different things that shouldn't be labeled better or worse than each other any more than a tomato is better or worse than an apple. If you want to improve your own skiing performance, you can choose to follow either of the same paths as the other two skiers or you can continue to follow your own path. On your path, the next biggest step that you can take is to learn how to move your body across the skis during the transition phase between turns instead of going "up and over". Can you see the vertical movement of your upper body? Chris's first turns have minimized this "up" movement but you can still see his turns start with an extension movement that drives his upper body up slightly. This is part of the Canadian style. They make it work. But what they have done is redirected most of the up movement into a horizontal movement of the body to the inside of the new turn (i.e. across the skis). This lets the ski push them into the new turn instead of pulling them. Where you see your hips slightly behind your heels, the skis are pulling you down the slope. It is hard to get the best performance skiing that way.

 

Try this exercise. Find a flat snow covered surface and get a friend off their skis to help you. Stand tall on your flat skis so that your toes, knees and nose are all over the same spot on the snow. Have your friend gently push (not too hard) both of your skis forward 2 inches/3cm (without warning). You'll probably jerk suddenly as you try to avoid falling backward. This is an exaggeration of how you make your turns today. Next have your friend do the same move on a count of 3, but this time at the 3 count you will also slightly move your weight from over the center of the feet to over the balls of the feet (e.g. try to stand on your toes a little bit). The goal is to have your whole body move forward as a unit instead of the jerky movement from the first part of the exercise. This should give you the same feeling of power that the next level of skiing performance feels like. This exercise won't teach how to move your body across the skis instead of up and over, but it will start you on a zen like path to get there.

 

Say "jiao" to David for me?

Hi Rusty:

 

Good and thank your opinion and thank your.Thumbs Up

 

But a little words, I can’t understand. I am sorry…:o

 

Norman


Edited by norman - 12/3/15 at 5:35pm
post #21 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ghost View Post
 


You misunderstand.  The thread is not meant to be a joke.  Norman is asking our opinion, and I suspect he is asking with a view to improve his own skiing.

In my opinion the Chris Brown skiing is better than the taichi skiing, the Taichi skiing shows wonderful fluidity of movement, but it is the wrong movements.   Norman would do well to icorporate the fluidity of the taichi skiing into the movements of the Chris Brown skiing (and perhaps find a better model for the movements too).


Yes. Your argument Approaching correct and This is not joke.Thumbs Up 

post #22 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by norman View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Ni Hao Norman,

 

You are asking us to compare apple to oranges to tomatoes. They are all fruits (and one of them is quite an odd fruit). You have shown us 3 clips of skiers doing 3 different things that shouldn't be labeled better or worse than each other any more than a tomato is better or worse than an apple. If you want to improve your own skiing performance, you can choose to follow either of the same paths as the other two skiers or you can continue to follow your own path. On your path, the next biggest step that you can take is to learn how to move your body across the skis during the transition phase between turns instead of going "up and over". Can you see the vertical movement of your upper body? Chris's first turns have minimized this "up" movement but you can still see his turns start with an extension movement that drives his upper body up slightly. This is part of the Canadian style. They make it work. But what they have done is redirected most of the up movement into a horizontal movement of the body to the inside of the new turn (i.e. across the skis). This lets the ski push them into the new turn instead of pulling them. Where you see your hips slightly behind your heels, the skis are pulling you down the slope. It is hard to get the best performance skiing that way.

 

Try this exercise. Find a flat snow covered surface and get a friend off their skis to help you. Stand tall on your flat skis so that your toes, knees and nose are all over the same spot on the snow. Have your friend gently push (not too hard) both of your skis forward 2 inches/3cm (without warning). You'll probably jerk suddenly as you try to avoid falling backward. This is an exaggeration of how you make your turns today. Next have your friend do the same move on a count of 3, but this time at the 3 count you will also slightly move your weight from over the center of the feet to over the balls of the feet (e.g. try to stand on your toes a little bit). The goal is to have your whole body move forward as a unit instead of the jerky movement from the first part of the exercise. This should give you the same feeling of power that the next level of skiing performance feels like. This exercise won't teach how to move your body across the skis instead of up and over, but it will start you on a zen like path to get there.

 

Say "jiao" to David for me?

Hi Rusty:

 

Good and thank your opinion and thank your.Thumbs Up

 

But a little words, I can’t understand. I am sorry…:o

 

Norman

Have David explain it to you. That is the best way to translate.

post #23 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Have David explain it to you. That is the best way to translate.

My mean, I know there are two David.


So I do not know what you say which one.

 

and what is "jiao".

 

If I sure who's David, I will ask and confirm.

post #24 of 27

I wouldn't want to ski like any of them.

post #25 of 27
I don't ski like any of them.
post #26 of 27
Quote:
Originally Posted by norman View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

Have David explain it to you. That is the best way to translate.

My mean, I know there are two David.


So I do not know what you say which one.

 

and what is "jiao".

 

If I sure who's David, I will ask and confirm.

The David who used to work at Whitetail with me and is on the Chinese ski forum with you.

post #27 of 27
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by TheRusty View Post
 

The David who used to work at Whitetail with me and is on the Chinese ski forum with you.

I see, now I know who is David, thanks many.:)

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