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Thoughts About the Future - Page 2

post #31 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lofcaudio View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

I have come to the conclusion that I will have to work a little longer (hoping for 58), save as much money as possible, and then when I do retire, I will continue to live in so cal and vacation like crazy to wherever the snow is the best all winter long.

 

This is most likely my reality as well (though 58 seems a bit ambitious for me).  And one of the advantages you mentioned definitely resonates with me -- being able to visit lots of different places (which of course, you could still do even if you re-located).  I've loved every ski day that I've had, but I've never skied more than 15 days in a season before.  Would it be possible for me to get tired of skiing if I did it more frequently?  (Silly worry?) 

For me, getting tired of skiing simply doesn't happen any more.  When I was a working and a "terminal intermediate" skiing groomers on a ski vacation out west every 2-3 years, that's when I could get bored and/or tired enough that I would stop skiing before last chair.  First time I skied >15 days as an adult was 2007-08, the first time I took my daughter to meet up with friends and ski Alta for a few days.

 

For 2014-15, I planned two trips out west with friends who were advanced skiers.  Mid-season I skied around SLC for 13 days non-stop, the late season trip ended up 18 days of skiing with a couple days off (1 travel day, 1 too warm so went shopping in SLC instead).  Most of those days started close to first chair and lasted until at least until 3pm, longer if conditions were good.  When I started skiing more as a retired parent, I was around age 50.  That changed after I had to do knee rehab (not a skiing injury) the summer of 2012.  I'm in much better shape than ten years ago.  Also invested time and money into high level lessons over the last few seasons.  Found a small group of ski buddies for trips out west.  In short, having worked at becoming a solid advanced skier who can handle a wide variety of terrain and conditions, I never get bored on skis.  I even have more fun skiing on short groomers in the mid-Atlantic than before because I know how to use the terrain to practice skills in order to be ready for big mountain skiing.

post #32 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post
 

I am, in my late 50's and, hopefully, 4 or 5 years away from moving out of CT and splitting my time between living on my boat somewhere down south and living in a ski town out west.  We have identified that town and are currently looking into buying a place in the next year or so.  We love Powder mountain and all the options for outdoor adventure and the conveniences of SLC's airport.  However we don't love the long term plans for Pow Mow with the new owners developing the place we feel that the vibe we loved may be gone.  Also not much of a town right there and we decided we would not want to live in Ogden and drive to the ski area.

 

Never expected to love Whitefish, MT as much as we do, but we skied there and loved it and then went back to check it out in late summer and loved it then too.  A bit of a PITA to get to as you do have to layover to fly into Kalispell which is a half hour or less from Whitefish. And yes it is cold, but that may be a hedge against global warming?  We like to keep our living expenses low and like to be able to walk to go out to dinner or pick up a few groceries and plan to buy a smaller house in town...living well within our means means we don't need to worry so much about taxes. The mountain is 7 miles from town, but there is a free shuttle bus going back and forth all day.  Anyway, great town, great tree skiing, if you like that sort of thing, tons of mountain biking and hiking options.  Seems like a good base for driving around the west and sampling different mountains and national parks etc..

 

 

Here is a thread I started 10 years ago when still in my 40's and if you read it you can see how my timeline and plans have changed.  James is right - it is hard to predict what will happen.

 

http://www.epicski.com/t/26120/are-you-planning-to-retire-to-the-mountains-and-where

 

Yes things can certainly change.  I guess the best thing to do is scout out some of these locations to get a flavor for them.  It may involve doing a seasonal rental to really see if we like the place before committing to a big move.

 

What I don't want is a big house with a lot of maintenance.  I'm getting my fill of that now.  I would think with the equity we'll have in our 600 some-odd thousand dollar house we would be able to buy something small outright and pocket some money.

 

Often times I think it's an exercise in futility thinking about all this but you gotta dream!

post #33 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by hespeler View Post
 

 

Yes things can certainly change.  I guess the best thing to do is scout out some of these locations to get a flavor for them.  It may involve doing a seasonal rental to really see if we like the place before committing to a big move.

 

What I don't want is a big house with a lot of maintenance.  I'm getting my fill of that now.  I would think with the equity we'll have in our 600 some-odd thousand dollar house we would be able to buy something small outright and pocket some money.

 

Often times I think it's an exercise in futility thinking about all this but you gotta dream!

That is another reason we want a small house with a small yard and a short driveway with a garage is essential.  Moving to snow country for retirement I want as little snow removal as possible and I don't want to be isolated out in the country.  Been there, done that.

post #34 of 59
Crank, if you can't afford the house now, better you should find a small piece of land now and build later. The time to buy was last year. (Actually, it was 15 years ago.) Median price in Whitefish has doubled in the last two years. Remember, you can always get a builder, you can't always find the spot you want. Very little in the way of empty lots left as it is. They're leveling three small houses downtown to put in a hotel near town. They've leveled city hall and the old Coldwell Banker building for a new City Hall and a parking garage. Telling you, don't keep postponing. If anything, buy a house to rent out until you're ready to move.
post #35 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Crank, if you can't afford the house now, better you should find a small piece of land now and build later. The time to buy was last year. (Actually, it was 15 years ago.) Median price in Whitefish has doubled in the last two years. Remember, you can always get a builder, you can't always find the spot you want. Very little in the way of empty lots left as it is. They're leveling three small houses downtown to put in a hotel near town. They've leveled city hall and the old Coldwell Banker building for a new City Hall and a parking garage. Telling you, don't keep postponing. If anything, buy a house to rent out until you're ready to move.

Sib,

 

We have been following the market on realtor.com and the size and location of house we are looking for seem to be not going up so fast.  We are looking into 2 -3 bedroom houses within walking distance to downtown prices anywhere from mid 200's to mid 300's.  There is one on the market now that we really like the looks of and we are thinking about sneaking out there for a look sometime soonish.

 

We can afford it now it's just a matter of (as you mention) do we want to buy it now and rent it out.  The answer to that is likely yes.  Whitefish is a popular place for folks looking for a reasonably priced ski town.  Met refugees from Aspen while there and have heard of folks moving there from Jackson Hole as well.  

post #36 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lofcaudio View Post

 

This is most likely my reality as well (though 58 seems a bit ambitious for me).  And one of the advantages you mentioned definitely resonates with me -- being able to visit lots of different places (which of course, you could still do even if you re-located).  I've loved every ski day that I've had, but I've never skied more than 15 days in a season before.  Would it be possible for me to get tired of skiing if I did it more frequently?  (Silly worry?) 

 

I don't think you mean physically tired, correct? I think you mean you are worried that skiing would lose some of its "specialness" if you did it almost every day all winter long mostly at the same place. Or am I off base? I have thought about that as well. My current philosophy is quality not quantity.

post #37 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

 

I think you mean you are worried that skiing would lose some of its "specialness" if you did it almost every day all winter long mostly at the same place.

 

Correct.  Right now, skiing for me is "magical."  It's my Disneyland.  It is exciting, uplifting, energizing, inspiring, etc.  It's also a rare treat for me, something I only get to do 1-3 times a year (only to spend the rest of the year daydreaming about my next trip).  If it would become my new normal, I worry that it would lose that specialness and just be something I enjoy doing if I don't have anything else to do.

post #38 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

 

I don't think you mean physically tired, correct? I think you mean you are worried that skiing would lose some of its "specialness" if you did it almost every day all winter long mostly at the same place. Or am I off base? I have thought about that as well. My current philosophy is quality not quantity.


I think burning out on sking is an issue. My plan is to diversify activities. CC sking, hiking, snow shoeing, etc. It may help that I have  a wife who doesn't really ski. So probably half days and then go do some other activity with her to keep her happy. Hopefully, not shopping. She thinks it's a sport, but I do not. 

post #39 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lofcaudio View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

 

I think you mean you are worried that skiing would lose some of its "specialness" if you did it almost every day all winter long mostly at the same place.

 

Correct.  Right now, skiing for me is "magical."  It's my Disneyland.  It is exciting, uplifting, energizing, inspiring, etc.  It's also a rare treat for me, something I only get to do 1-3 times a year (only to spend the rest of the year daydreaming about my next trip).  If it would become my new normal, I worry that it would lose that specialness and just be something I enjoy doing if I don't have anything else to do.


Hasn't been a problem for me.  Just as excited on Day 15 or Day 25 or Day 55 whether I'm going to ski in the Mid-Atlantic or out west.  I think it helps that I've found friends for trips who are just as excited about a ski day even if conditions aren't stellar.  Some are beginners getting their kids started, others are adults who learned within the last 5 years, and others are long time skiers.

post #40 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Crank, if you can't afford the house now, better you should find a small piece of land now and build later. The time to buy was last year. (Actually, it was 15 years ago.) Median price in Whitefish has doubled in the last two years. Remember, you can always get a builder, you can't always find the spot you want. Very little in the way of empty lots left as it is. They're leveling three small houses downtown to put in a hotel near town. They've leveled city hall and the old Coldwell Banker building for a new City Hall and a parking garage. Telling you, don't keep postponing. If anything, buy a house to rent out until you're ready to move.


@sibhusky Do you see more upscale homes being built for trust fund types or do you see the median being what a normal family would actually purchase? Sometimes those numbers can be misleading especially in resort second home areas. Only takes a few multi millionaires to have $800-1,200,000 sales to offset that statistic in small areas such as Whitefish.

 

I personally have looked and am quite surprised what $400,000 will get you in the area between Whitefish and Kalispell. That area is definitely on my list. Doesn't seem like many other ski towns have housing for larger families under $3mm lol.

post #41 of 59

 

Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier


@sibhusky Do you see more upscale homes being built for trust fund types or do you see the median being what a normal family would actually purchase? Sometimes those numbers can be misleading especially in resort second home areas. Only takes a few multi millionaires to have $800-1,200,000 sales to offset that statistic in small areas such as Whitefish.

 

I personally have looked and am quite surprised what $400,000 will get you in the area between Whitefish and Kalispell. That area is definitely on my list. Doesn't seem like many other ski towns have housing for larger families under $3mm lol.

 

Have you checked out Driggs, ID?

post #42 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 

 

Have you checked out Driggs, ID?

Not really. I think the one issue was distance to a costco for my wife. I know that sounds absurd but it is what it is.

post #43 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lofcaudio View Post
 

 

Correct.  Right now, skiing for me is "magical."  It's my Disneyland.  It is exciting, uplifting, energizing, inspiring, etc.  It's also a rare treat for me, something I only get to do 1-3 times a year (only to spend the rest of the year daydreaming about my next trip).  If it would become my new normal, I worry that it would lose that specialness and just be something I enjoy doing if I don't have anything else to do.


The idea of burning out is a scary one, huh? I've heard people say it about skiing and other passions, and participating on a forum like this one, you see super-active posters come and go and wonder if they just stopped posting or stopped skiing. 

 

I think it's different for everyone. I think I'd burn out if I tried riding every day of the season - rain, sleet, cold, sun -so I don't really have interest in doing that. While I ride about three times as much as I did before moving to ski country, I'd say all it takes is one great day to make it every bit as "special" as back then, and you're much more likely to get those days by living in the mountains. 

 

And if you do burn out, so what? You can say that you literally skied until you didn't want to ski anymore, then find something else you love to do. I wanted to move to the mountains primarily for snowboarding (with a side of mountain biking), but I soon found that I really liked just being in the mountains - being surrounded by scenery all the time, hiking out the backyard, camping, etc. IMO, all outdoor activities - even just sitting in the backyard - are better in the mountains. It's kind of scary imagining living in a place with no mountains again. And I really like the combination of mountain and desert in Utah. So if I stopped enjoying snowboarding, I think I'd find something else to do here. 

post #44 of 59

Good skiing is like romance; the more you get, the more you want:-) 

If you’re like me you will find the sunny days with good conditions or the powder days just keep you mentally fired-up, and those two types of scenarios make up most of the days in places like CO, UT, and CA.  In my whole nine week western trip I never saw really bitter cold or all day soaker rain.  Even when temp is single digits it's dry and doesn't feel bad, and usually warms quickly when sun comes out.  Also, if you’re there for an extended period you can cherry pick the best days/times to go and keep yourself fresh.  I come from the mid-Atlantic where even if you ski a lot, you may count the days with truly good conditions in a whole season on one hand.  To have good conditions day after day is very motivating.  Remember, you will have a lot of pent up demand after years of delayed gratification:-)

I suppose the one day I had a little mental burnout was my very last ski day when I was a little out of sorts and already mentally preparing to return to the real world the next day.  It was also a messy spring day with intermittent wet snow squalls that I was slightly under dressed for.

post #45 of 59

I am a fair-weather skier.  Don't usually bother with typical eastern man made conditions... will not ever ski in the rain.  Love powder and exploring off piste.  Moving to a ski town does not mean I will ski every day all day.  I am a skier who gets easily bored on groomers and am not into perfecting the perfect carve, form, or perfect placement of whatever body part is being discussed over in the instructors forum.  I think it is the inside foot right now.

 

I could see myself volunteering as a mountain guide which would get me out of the house and on the hill on days I might now normally bother.  It would also be fun, I think, to share and show off my local hill to visiting skiers.  However, I would want to retain the freedom to powder chase so that might rule the mountain guide thing out.  Thing is, I realize I only have so many years left to be physically active as I want to be. But what the hell I will go as long as I can.

post #46 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post

Crank, if you can't afford the house now, better you should find a small piece of land now and build later. The time to buy was last year. (Actually, it was 15 years ago.) Median price in Whitefish has doubled in the last two years. Remember, you can always get a builder, you can't always find the spot you want. Very little in the way of empty lots left as it is. They're leveling three small houses downtown to put in a hotel near town. They've leveled city hall and the old Coldwell Banker building for a new City Hall and a parking garage. Telling you, don't keep postponing. If anything, buy a house to rent out until you're ready to move.

@sibhusky
Do you see more upscale homes being built for trust fund types or do you see the median being what a normal family would actually purchase? Sometimes those numbers can be misleading especially in resort second home areas. Only takes a few multi millionaires to have $800-1,200,000 sales to offset that statistic in small areas such as Whitefish.

I personally have looked and am quite surprised what $400,000 will get you in the area between Whitefish and Kalispell. That area is definitely on my list. Doesn't seem like many other ski towns have housing for larger families under $3mm lol.

My understanding from the real estate agent next door to me is that median-priced homes are where the market is tight. I.e., I think, $200-$400,000. There is/was (last time I asked him) an excess of homes in the over $1 million range just sitting. Not that they've built new ones so much as they've been hanging around since 2009 waiting to be sold and have been through multiple agents and price reductions. I have two homes up the hill from me in the $450-795,000 range that are clearly not the right price. "Median" is closer to "moderate" than it might be elsewhere. (Edit: Article in the paper this week. http://flatheadbeacon.com/2015/12/01/kelleys-market-trends-flathead-median-vs-u-s-home-prices/) "Average" would be skewed by places like that $20 million dollar listing.

The area between Kalispell and Whitefish is probably okay for moderate housing. But, that would be more like 40 minutes or more from the slopes, given you have to get THROUGH Whitefish and there is really only one obvious road across the railroad tracks. The other road would require some forethought (and possibly a different vehicle), and a third alternative would not buy you anything.
Edited by sibhusky - 12/2/15 at 3:34pm
post #47 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post

Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post

 

Have you checked out Driggs, ID?
Not really. I think the one issue was distance to a costco for my wife. I know that sounds absurd but it is what it is.

People willing to pay $3 million shop at Costco?
post #48 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by crank View Post

I am a fair-weather skier.  Don't usually bother with typical eastern man made conditions... will not ever ski in the rain.  Love powder and exploring off piste.  Moving to a ski town does not mean I will ski every day all day.  I am a skier who gets easily bored on groomers and am not into perfecting the perfect carve, form, or perfect placement of whatever body part is being discussed over in the instructors forum.  I think it is the inside foot right now.

I could see myself volunteering as a mountain guide which would get me out of the house and on the hill on days I might now normally bother.  It would also be fun, I think, to share and show off my local hill to visiting skiers.  However, I would want to retain the freedom to powder chase so that might rule the mountain guide thing out.  Thing is, I realize I only have so many years left to be physically active as I want to be. But what the hell I will go as long as I can.

I've thought about the "Ambassador" thing repeatedly, especially when I needed money for a pass desperately. However, the thought of escorting around the hill some of the visitors I've seen restores "reality" to me every time. Most of the people who do that really really like the job, but due to the camaraderie with other Ambassadors more than the visitors. I notice a fair number of "former Ambassadors" as well. They all still ski together, but apparently not all stayed with it. I know I'd be saying how I felt inappropriately by the third day.....
post #49 of 59

Places that come to mind:

 

-Flagstaff, AZ. ya I know, Whaaaa? But it's so sunny and warm here. Skiing is a just a bonus part to the equation. 

-Bend, OR.

-Whitefish MT.

-Bozeman, MT.

-Gunnison, CO.

-Bellingham, WA.

-Wenatchee, WA.

post #50 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by sibhusky View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by ohioskier View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post

 

Have you checked out Driggs, ID?
Not really. I think the one issue was distance to a costco for my wife. I know that sounds absurd but it is what it is.

People willing to pay $3 million shop at Costco?


122 miles from Driggs to the Costco in Pocatello. Your wife would not be stoked

post #51 of 59
Just re-inserting this (left out kids because kids adjust)
Quote:
There are some realities which cannot be ignored however...

We are life-long New Yorkers. For those who don't know, LI is primarily made up of people from the five boroughs (myself included)who want to live in suburbia. Even though you see plenty of pick-ups on LI, the frontier it ain't.

Reality #1: My wife is really cool and well-rounded but I can't take a girl from LI and bring her to a place where there is only a Wal Mart and a Target for shopping, etc., etc. Truth is I'm not sure I could do it either. Very few places are going to have the "at your fingertips" lifestyle that NY does but some place that does have some semblance of it at least nearby would be necessary.

Reality #2: My wife does not deal with the cold all that well. Yes she likes to ski and does fine when she's geared up and tapes on those toe warmer things but when she's not skiing she starts to get cold when the weather gets to about 60 degrees. I on the other hand cannot stand the heat and humidity. FL is out!

These are reasons to eliminate Whitefish. Yeah, there are some nicer stores in town, but there's no Neiman Marcus, Roots, Chanel, etc. She'd be jumping on the train to Seattle. Plus, we could have 60's in June. Not this past June, but the past week has been decidedly frigid. Best that can be said is the range year round is between -10f and +100f. http://www.usclimatedata.com/climate/whitefish/montana/united-states/usmt0356

She'd be happy in July and August.
post #52 of 59

Interesting plan to retire and be a ski bum.  Because you said Reality #3:  "The kids come first" I hope you don't raid your kids college fund to implement your plan.  Fostering a love of the mountains is great so is fostering a love of learning and were are you going to find the best schools for them?

post #53 of 59

Send those mouth breathing kids off to Mexico to work in Nike factories. Sell everything and run to the hills, NOW! 

 

Life is too short to spend it in the tri-state suburbs. 


Edited by raisingarizona - 12/2/15 at 6:16pm
post #54 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle-A View Post

Interesting plan to retire and be a ski bum.  Because you said Reality #3:  "The kids come first" I hope you don't raid your kids college fund to implement your plan.  Fostering a love of the mountains is great so is fostering a love of learning and were are you going to find the best schools for them?

We've got the college-savings plans going. They should be well set up. They are also in a blue ribbon school district on Long Island. LI has a very good school system.

Last year we were willing to let them miss a Friday here and there to go up skiing but my son was working on perfect attendance and wanted to keep it so home we stayed.

I expect my ski days to greatly diminish now that they're playing sports. Most of our wknds will be spent at their games.

What I'm really trying to foster is for them to have a passion for something in life. If it's the mountains great if not that's fine too.

As far as relocating my wife and I probably have different philosophies. Her parents stayed local. As soon as I left the house my parents moved to Jersey. Not cross country for sure but NY to NJ is often harder than flying somewhere (not kidding). My parents were great but I recognized that they struggled for a long time raising us and should be able to have the freedom to try somewhere else new. It was my time to figure things out.

Also everyone's definition of ski bum is different. 30 days would be a lot for me.
post #55 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle-A View Post
 

Interesting plan to retire and be a ski bum.  Because you said Reality #3:  "The kids come first" I hope you don't raid your kids college fund to implement your plan.  Fostering a love of the mountains is great so is fostering a love of learning and were are you going to find the best schools for them?

post #56 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by hespeler View Post
 
Quote:
Originally Posted by Uncle-A View Post

Interesting plan to retire and be a ski bum.  Because you said Reality #3:  "The kids come first" I hope you don't raid your kids college fund to implement your plan.  Fostering a love of the mountains is great so is fostering a love of learning and were are you going to find the best schools for them?

We've got the college-savings plans going. They should be well set up. They are also in a blue ribbon school district on Long Island. LI has a very good school system.

Last year we were willing to let them miss a Friday here and there to go up skiing but my son was working on perfect attendance and wanted to keep it so home we stayed.

I expect my ski days to greatly diminish now that they're playing sports. Most of our wknds will be spent at their games.

What I'm really trying to foster is for them to have a passion for something in life. If it's the mountains great if not that's fine too.

As far as relocating my wife and I probably have different philosophies. Her parents stayed local. As soon as I left the house my parents moved to Jersey. Not cross country for sure but NY to NJ is often harder than flying somewhere (not kidding). My parents were great but I recognized that they struggled for a long time raising us and should be able to have the freedom to try somewhere else new. It was my time to figure things out.

Also everyone's definition of ski bum is different. 30 days would be a lot for me.


Dang! You call yourself a New Yorker? I thought you'd at least call him Uncle-A hole :D

post #57 of 59
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lofcaudio View Post
 

Good stuff and echos so many of the thoughts rattling around in my own head (only swap NYer for Midwesterner).  I am 44 and would love to retire out West to be in the mountains.  For some reason, Ogden is the place that sounds awfully ideal for me.  (Glenwood Springs and Boulder would be awesome but are probably too pricey.)

 

Take another look at the Glenwood area- or just outside. Prices fall QUICKLY outside of the Roaring Fork, and Rifle, Newcastle, etc. are lovely little towns.

 

I never got tired of this view.

 

 

..and here's a listing to give you an idea.

 

http://www.realtor.com/realestateandhomes-detail/820-W-26th-St_Rifle_CO_81650_M12253-53519

 

From Rifle, it is 40 minutes to Sunlight and a little over an hour to Aspen. BC is only about 1:30 away and I know some people that skied there off an Epic Local pass for budget reasons.

 

It is also wonderful to be always driving opposite of traffic on I-70. 

post #58 of 59
Thread Starter 
Quote:
Originally Posted by agreen View Post
 


Dang! You call yourself a New Yorker? I thought you'd at least call him Uncle-A hole :D

 

Not bad at all, agreen.  Not bad at all...

post #59 of 59

So you're looking for a place that is close to skiing for you and has civilization or is close enough to civilization for your wife.  

 

Big ones you already know:

Denver/Boulder

Reno

Salt Lake City area

 

Ones you may not have considered:

Fort Collins, CO

Santa Fe, NM

Portland, OR 

Bend, OR 

Bellingham, WA

Flagstaff, AZ

 

On the East coast:

Burlington, VT

Jackson/North Conway,NH

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